Research Index / Materials Science / Motivation

As compact ultrafast laser systems, that are affordable and reliable, continue to be developed, interest in their application to practical problems in materials science also continues to expand.  Solid-state, diode-pumped, and fiber-based ultrafast laser systems are sufficiently commonplace to encourage an intensification of such applications research.  Controlled output levels for 100-femtosecond lasers, operating at 10 Hertz to 1 kilohertz, in the 100-microjoule to several-millijoule energy range are currently available in commercial systems.  This opens the opportunity for direct application of these devices to thin film synthesis, growth processing, and subsequent micro-fabrication.

In this lab, we examine aspects of those applications in terms of laser energy absorption, redistribution, plasma formation, and ablation plume dynamics as they are relevant to the process of thin film deposition.  The laser system we use is Ti:sapphire-based with pulses as short as 100 femtoseconds at a wavelength of 780 nanometers and a repetition rate of 10 Hertz, with an energy per pulse as high as 100 millijoules and contrast as high as 107 (peak-to-background).


Research Index / Materials Science / Motivation

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