Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Farnam Jahanian Named AAAS Fellow

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Farnam Jahanian, the Edward S. Davidson Collegiate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Chair for Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan, has been elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for his "distinguished contributions to the dependability and security of network systems."

Over the last two decades, Prof. Jahanian has led several large-scale research projects studying the growth and scalability of the Internet backbone routing infrastructure that have ultimately transformed how cyber threats are addressed by Internet Service Providers. In the 1990s, his research team demonstrated fundamental limitations in the core routing architecture of the Internet by uncovering the fragility of the underlying routing infrastructure. The group's seminal work on Internet routing stability and convergence has been highly influential within both the network research community and the Internet operational community. It served as a catalyst for significant changes in commercial Internet routing software implementation and impacted routing policies employed by Internet Service Providers throughout the world. This work was recently recognized with an ACM SIGCOMM Test of Time Award.

His research on Internet infrastructure and security formed the basis for the successful Internet security services company Arbor Networks, which Prof. Jahanian co-founded in 2001. Today, 70 percent of Internet backbone transit traffic is protected by Arbor technology, demonstrating how basic university research can be uniquely central to an innovation ecosystem that drives economic growth, global competitiveness, and job creation.

Prof. Jahanian holds a master's degree and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Texas at Austin. He joined the University of Michigan in 1993, and is affiliated with the department's Software Systems Lab. He is a Fellow of ACM and IEEE.

About the AAAS and the AAAS Fellows Program

Founded in 1848, the American Association for the Advancement of Science serves some 262 affiliated societies and academies of science, serving 10 million individuals.

The AAAS Fellows Program dates back to 1874, with fellows elected by peer AAAS members and chosen because of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.

Read More

AAAS press release: AAAS Members Elected as Fellows

U-M News Service: Nine university scientists and engineers named AAAS fellows


Posted: January 11, 2011