Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Martha Pollack Named Fellow of AAAS, ACM

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Martha E. Pollack, Vice Provost for Academic and Budgetary Affairs at the University of Michigan, Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, and Professor of Information, has been elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery. Both are significant honors.

Prof. Pollack's research has been in the area of artificial intelligence, with a focus on both foundational and algorithmic issues (including automated plan generation, constraint-based temporal reasoning, adaptive interfaces, natural-language processing), as well as on applications of AI to the design of assistive technology for people with cognitive impairment. She testified on this latter topic before the United States Senate Subcommittee on Aging.

The author or co-author of more than 100 research papers, Pollack is a Fellow of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI). Amongst her other honors are the IJCAII Computers and Thought Award, an NSF Young Investigator's Award, and the University of Pittsburgh Chancellor's Distinguished Research Award, as well as several best paper awards for work done with her doctoral students. In 2008, she received the Influential Paper Award ("Test of Time prize") from the International Foundation of Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems for her 1988 paper on computational rationality, co-authored with Michael Bratman and David Israel.

Prof. Pollack holds an M.S.E. and a Ph.D. in Computer and Information Science from the University of Pennsylvania. She joined the University of Michigan in 2000, coming to Michigan from the University of Pittsburgh.

About the AAAS and the AAAS Fellows Program

Founded in 1848, the American Association for the Advancement of Science serves some 262 affiliated societies and academies of science, serving 10 million individuals.

The AAAS Fellows Program dates back to 1874, with fellows elected by peer AAAS members and chosen because of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.

About the ACM Fellows Program

Initiated in 1993, the ACM Fellows Program celebrates the exceptional contributions of the leading members in the computing field. These individuals have helped to enlighten researchers, developers, practitioners, and end-users of information technology throughout the world. Their accomplishments play a crucial role in driving innovations that are necessary to sustain competitiveness in an information-based society.

Read More

AAAS press release: AAAS Members Elected as Fellows

U-M Record Update: Thirteen U-M scientists and engineers named AAAS fellows

ACM Press Release: ACM Names Fellows for Computing Advances that Are Driving Innovation


Posted: December 15, 2011