Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Brian Noble Appointed Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education at the College of Engineering



CSE Prof. Brian Noble has been selected to serve as Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education at the College of Engineering. His appointment was approved at the U-M Regents meeting on June 20, 2013.

Prof. Noble's appointment is effective July 1, 2013. He succeeds James Holloway, who is stepping down to become the U-M Vice Provost for Global and Engaged Education.

The Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education has the primary responsibility for the education of the College's undergraduate students.  This includes oversight of curriculum development, assessment, teaching and pedagogy, first year courses, and the College's cross-disciplinary academic programs, including international programs, technical communications, team projects, the multidisciplinary design program, honors and engagement programs.  In addition, the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education has oversight of the ENGR subject courses within the College.


Prof. Noble in class

Students have high praise for Prof. Noble, who is happy to engage with them in determining where their talents and interests lie. He has stated that one of the most rewarding aspects of his position as a faculty member has been his ability to help students succeed. Prof. Noble has won a host of education and teaching awards, including a U-M Undergraduate Teaching Award, the Vulcans Education Excellence Award, the CoE Ruth and Joel Spira Teaching Award, and the CoE Neil Van Eenam Memorial Undergraduate Teaching Award.

Prof. Noble received his PhD in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1998 and joined the U-M faculty that year. His research interests center on mobile, pervasive, and ubiquitous systems, and projects he has undertaken have included securing mobile devices against physical possession attacks; providing for fairness in collaborative, peer-to-peer storage systems; measuring and modeling network availability and host mobility; and improving access to the information economy in the developing world. In addition to operating systems, distributed systems, and mobile computing, he also has interests in incentive-centered design, the usability of mobile systems, and automotive telematics. Prof. Noble was the recipient of an NSF CAREER award in 2000 and was named a Morris Wellman Faculty Development Assistant Professor of EECS in 2002. He has recently played a leadership role on the Campus IT Council.

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Posted: June 21, 2013