Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Defense Event

MODELING STUDIES OF ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE MICROPLASMAS: PLASMA DYNAMICS, SURFACE INTERACTION AND APPLICATIONS

Jun-Chieh Wang

PhD Candidate
Student
 
Friday, June 20, 2014
10:00am - 12:00pm
3316 EECS

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About the Event

Technologies based on atmospheric-pressure microplasmas (APMs)have been widely developed due the unique nature microplasmas being nonequilibrium and its ability to operate stably at atmospheric pressure. Electrophotographic printing, sensors, surface functionalization and plasma medicine are typical applications of APMs. However, obtaining accurate measurements and characterizing the plasma parameters are challenging due to the complicated plasma dynamics and the small spatial and temporal scales. In this thesis, results from a computational investigation of APMs are discussed with the goal of improving our fundamental understanding of the nonlinear plasma kinetics of APMs, and to provide design rules for the devices of interest. In this presentation, results will be discussed from a numerical investigation of APMs sustained in dry air in the narrowing gap between a dc-biased charge roller (CR) and a photoconductor (PC) as used in electrophotographic (EP) printing technologies, and the charging of both stationary and moving dielectric PC surfaces. The periodic charging patterns observed predicted by the simulations are consistent with experiment observations. Results will then be presented from numerical investigations of a microdischargebased pressure sensor sustained in atmospheric-pressure argon. Compared to sensors using piezoresistive and capacitive methods, a microdischarge-based pressure sensor is potentially capable of being an order of magnitude smaller, and more conducive to hostile environments at high temperature.

Additional Information

Sponsor: Mark J Kushner

Open to: Limited