Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

CSE News

Pressure-Sensing Smartphones: Software Lets Mobile Devices Feel Force

Kang G. Shin, the Kevin and Nancy O'Connor Professor, and CSE graduate student Yu-Chih Tung have developed ForcePhone, a software that allows smartphones to sense force or pressure on its screen or body. ForcePhone works by borrowing two of a phones fundamental attributes, its microphone and speaker. The developers envision many uses for their technology, which could offer the masses a coveted feature of the latest generation of smartphones. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Shin, Kang  

Nan Jiang Receives Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship for Research on Reinforcement Learning

Nan Jiang, a CSE PhD candidate, has been awarded a Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to support his research while he completes his dissertation, which is entitled, A Theory of Model Selection in Batch Reinforcement Learning. The Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship is awarded to outstanding doctoral candidates in the final stages of their program who are unusually creative, ambitious and risk-taking. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

M-FLY Debuts Two Planes at SAE Competition, Finishes Top 10

M-FLY, an interdisciplinary student team dedicated to designing competitive aircraft, brought two of its planes to the 2016 SAE Aero Design Competition East in Fort Worth, Texas in March. Entering both the regular and advanced class competitions, Jacob Gersh, Sophia Mehdizadeh, and Vaibhav Parashar, electrical engineering students, helped the team finish top 10 in both categories, including a first-place oral competition finish. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Tony Fadell: How Can We Design For A Better Experience?

Tony Fadell (BSE CE 91), the designer behind the iPod and the Nest thermostat, delivered a TED Talk on why design is in the details and why designers often get those details wrong. Tony Fadell is a co-founder of Nest. He led the team that created the first 18 generations of the iPod and the first three generations of the iPhone. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Entrepreneurship  

Sony Wants to Push AIs to Learn From Their Own Experiences

Sony has invested in AI startup Cogitai to build intelligent systems that will learn from their own experiences in the world. Prof. Satinder Singh, the co-founder of Cogitai, discusses continual learning and the future of intelligent systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

CSE Sponsors TechTwilight to Support Young People in STEM

CSE is a sponsor of the 2016 TechTwilight. TechTwilight provides companies and student groups with the opportunity to celebrate and share their innovations in a festive environment of discovery. The event encourages young people to pursue careers in, and develop life-long interests in, science, technology, and engineering. [Full Story]

Malware Attacks Putting Patients' Medical Records at Risk

Prof. Kevin Fu talks to Michigan Radio about the recent news stories regarding some U.S. hospitals being hit by malware attacks. When hospitals are hit, patient records can be in danger. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Software Systems  Medical Device Security  

More Than 30 States Offer Online Voting, but Experts Warn it isnt Secure

This article revisits the question of online voting. Prof. Halderman cites a pilot project from six years ago in DC where the public was invited to attack a proposed Internet voting system. Halderman led a team that within 48 hours was able to gain nearly complete control of the server and change every vote. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  

Michael P. Wellman Named Lynn A. Conway Collegiate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Michael P. Wellman has been named the Lynn A. Conway Collegiate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering in recognition of his outstanding contributions in the areas of research, education, and leadership. This appointment was celebrated at a ceremony which took place on May 5, 2016. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

Google, U-M to Build Digital Tools for Flint Water Crisis

A partnership between Google and the University of Michigans Ann Arbor and Flint campuses aims to provide a smartphone app and other digital tools to Flint residents and officials to help them manage the ongoing water crisis. The Michigan Data Science Team, led by CSE Prof. Jacob Abernethy, will be involved in the partnership. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Lab-Theory of Computation  

EECS 183 Showcase Highlights Another Round of Final Projects

On Thursday, April 21st, students, parents, and professors attended the EECS 183 Showcase at Palmer Commons. Non-CS students from EECS 183, Elementary Programming Concepts, presented what they learned about CS this semester in a day-long showcase that featured over 150 projects made by over 600 students. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dorf, Mary Lou  Undergraduate Students  

Hacking into Homes: Security Flaws Found in SmartThings Connected Home System

Prof. Atul Prakash, CSE graduate student Earlence Fernandes, and Jaeyeon Jung (Microsoft Research), have performed a security analysis of the SmartThings programming framework. They were able to hack into the automation system and essentially get the PIN code to a homes front door. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Prakash, Atul  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Award-Winning EECS 2016 Graduate Student Instructors & Instructional Aides Recognized

The EECS Department held its annual Graduate Student Instructor (GSI) / Instructional Aide (IA) Awards Ceremony on April 28 to honor top student instructors and aides for their remarkable service and excellence in teaching. ECE and CSE Associate Chairs Dave Neuhoff and Scott Mahlke hosted the event and introduced the awardees. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Mahlke, Scott  Neuhoff, David L.  

Students Make Connections at NSBE National Convention

The 42nd Annual Convention of the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) brought members together in Boston, MA for career fairs, competitions, professional workshops, networking events, and elections. Forty three U-M engineers, six from EECS, attended the convention, themed Engineering a Cultural Change. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Undergraduate Students  

David Chesney Receives 2016 Provost's Teaching Innovation Prize

Dr. David Chesney has been awarded the 2016 Provost's Teaching Innovation Prize, which recognizes faculty who have developed an innovative project. For many years, Chesney has suggested that his students think in terms of social good when developing their projects. Through his courses, students are able to learn the fundamentals of programming and software systems, while also seeing the social impact of computer science. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chesney, David  Engineering for the Greater Good  

Girls Encoded Motivates Students to Study CS

For the second year in a row, over 100 high school girls and their parents attended Girls Encoded, an all day event designed to educate and encourage girls to study computer science. The event took place Saturday, April 9th and was co-directed by Prof. Rada Mihalcea, CSE research fellow Veronica Perez-Rosas, and CS student Lauren Molley. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Das, Reetuparna  Diversity and Outreach  Mihalcea, Rada  

Your Devices' Latest Feature? They Can Spy on Your Every Move

In The Converstation, Prof. HV Jagadish sheds light on how smart devices are a gateway for hackers to spy on you. Since devices are networked, they can communicate in ways we dont want them to and people can take control of these technologies to learn private information about you. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Jagadish, HV  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

For Michigan Professor, Computer Science is Much More Than a Job

This article reports on Prof. Jason Mars and his work in developing technologies for intelligent personal assistants, from the software for the assistants themselves to the servers that are required to run such software. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  

CSE Alumna Arzucan Ozgur Receives Science Academy Young Scientist Award

Arzucan Ozgur (PhD CSE 2010) has been awarded a Science Academy Young Scientist Award (BAGEP 2016, Turkey). Arzucan is an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Engineering at Bogazici University in Istanbul. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Radev, Dragomir  

5 big challenges that self-driving cars still have to overcome

in this article, Prof. Edwin Olson comments on what are seen are the key challenges involved in deploying autonomous or assistive driving technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Kimberly Mann Receives CoE Excellence in Staff Service Award

Kimberly Mann, CSE AI Lab Research Administrator, has been selected to receive a 2016 College of Engineering Excellence in Staff Service Award. Each year, CoE recognizes sustained excellence in staff who have made significant contributions or possess special qualities and attributes that foster teamwork and achievement. [Full Story]

Marcus Darden Voted HKN Professor of the Year for CSE

EECS students voted, and Dr. Marcus Darden was named the 2015-2016 HKN Professor of the Year in CSE by the Beta-Epsilon chapter of Eta Kappa Nu (HKN), the national honor society for electrical and computer engineers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Darden, Marcus  Undergraduate Students  

Walter Lasecki and Collaborators Win Best Paper at W4A

A team of four researchers including Prof. Walter Lasecki has won a Best Paper Award at the Web for All (W4A) Conference for "The Effects of Automatic Speech Recognition Quality on Human Transcription Latency," which explores how automated speech recognition and crowd-sourced human correction and generation of transcripts can be traded off to improve accuracy and latency. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Accessibility  Big Data  Interactive Systems  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Interactive Systems  Lab-Software Systems  Lasecki, Walter  

CSE Launches Health Initiative for Staff

To foster an environment of wellness in the spirit of the University's MHealthy program, the CSE Division is tapping the power of computation to help encourage healthy behavior amongst its administrative and support staff. [Full Story]

GridWatch Named Finalist in Vodafone's Eighth Annual Wireless Innovation Competition

GridWatch, a system for monitoring the state of the power grid using smartphones, has been selected as a finalist in the Vodafone Americas Foundation's Wireless Innovation Project competition. GridWatch is a collaboration between researchers at UM and UC Berkeley; the Michigan researchers include Prof. Prabal Dutta and graduate students Noah Klugman, Pat Pannuto, and William Huang. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dutta, Prabal  Energy  Graduate Students  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Sensors  

Dropping USB Drives Is the Easiest Trick Hackers Can Use - And You're Probably a Sucker

Researchers including CSE graduate student Zakir Durumeric have discovered a highly effective security hack to gain access to others' computing systems - leaving USB flash drives with malicious payloads laying on the ground. In their study, they found there is a nearly 50% chance that someone will pick up a given drive, plug it into their computer, and start clicking. This presents the opportunity for malware to be activated. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Alumna Jennifer Rexford Named 2016-2017 Athena Lecturer by ACM-W

Alumna Jennifer Rexford (CSE MSE 93 PHD 96), the Gordon Y.S. Wu Professor of Engineering and Chair of the Computer Science Department at Princeton University, has been named the 2016-2017 Athena Lecturer by CRA-W for her work in improving Internet transmissions and making data networks easier to manage. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Jacob Abernethy: Machine Learning and the Wisdom of the Crowd

The National Science Foundation reports on the work of Prof. Jacob Abernethy, who is investigating the relationship between machine learning algorithms and market economy dynamics to develop socially beneficial forecasts. His work in this area is supported by a CAREER Award from NSF. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Economic Systems  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  

Visionary Engineer Lynn Conway Heralds Dawn of the Techno-Social Age

At Columbia University Engineering's annual Magill Lecture, pioneering engineer and computer scientist Lynn Conway said, "Humanity stands at the cusp of a new technological and social renaissance." Conway, professor emerita of computer science and electrical engineering at the University of Michigan, is a pioneer of microelectronics chip design. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Conway, Lynn  

CSE Graduate Student Vidal Borromeo Recognized with CoE Towner Prize

CSE graduate student Vidal Borromeo has been selected to receive a 2016 Towner Prize for Outstanding Graduate Student Instructors by the College of Engineering. Vidal is currently the GSI for EECS 381, where he makes use of innovative learning techniques to raise the level of engagement and to help students to remember key concepts. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

University Collaborates with Toyota on Autonomous Vehicle Hub

Toyota and Michigan have announced a new research collaboration that will involve a new Toyota facility, Mcity, and two faculty with appointments in CSE: Profs. Edwin Olson and Ryan Eustice. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Clark Zhang Earns NSF Fellowship for Data Processing in MEMS Networks

Clark Zhang, a senior in Computer Engineering, has earned an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship for his research proposal on gathering useful data from MEMS sensor systems. This summer, he is working as an intern at NASAs Jet Propulsion Laboratory. There, hell be a part of a project called Resilient Spacecraft Architecture, which works to make the autonomous systems on spacecraft more robust and willing to take risks without an operator intervening. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  MEMS and Microsystems  Signal and Image Processing   Undergraduate Students  

Joshua Adkins Selected for NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

Joshua Adkins, a senior in Computer Engineering, has been awarded a prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. While at Michigan, Josh has worked with Prof. Prabal Dutta in Lab 11, the Embedded Systems Lab in CSE. His research interests lie in the areas of embedded systems, ubiquitous computing, and energy harvesting. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dutta, Prabal  Undergraduate Students  

Genevieve Flaspohler Selected for NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

Genevieve Flaspohler, a senior in Computer Engineering, has been awarded a prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. During the past four years, Genevieve has been involved in a number of interdisciplinary research projects related to embedded systems at Michigan, working with faculty in Mechanical Engineering and with Prof. Prabal Dutta in CSE. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dutta, Prabal  Undergraduate Students  

Ryan Marcotte Selected for NSF and NDSEG Graduate Research Fellowships

CSE graduate student Ryan Marcotte has been selected for two prestigious graduate fellowships to support his ongoing studies in computer science and engineering. The fellowships are from the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program and the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship from the Department of Defense. Ryan works with Prof. Edwin Olson in the APRIL Lab, where his research is in the area of multi-agent search algorithms for both known and unexplored environments. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Olson, Edwin  

With Hospital Ransomware Infections, the Patients Are at Risk

The article in MIT Technology Review quotes Prof. Kevin Fu on the recent string of ransomware attacks against hospitals. Prof. Fu's research is in the area of security for medical equipment, from implanted devices through bedside monitoring equipment, medical diagnostic equipment, and medical IT systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Malware Attacks On Hospitals Put Patients At Risk

The article at NPR describes recent cases in which hospitals became the victims of ransomware attacks. Prof. Kevin Fu, an expert on the security vulnerabilities of medical equipment, is quoted. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Fall 2016: Introduction to Autonomous Robotics

Course No.: EECS 398-004
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Chad Jenkins
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Course Description:
This course covers the essentials of robot modeling and autonomy. [More Info]

Fall 2016: Fundamentals of the Internet

Course No.: EECS 398-001
Credit Hours: 2 credits
Instructor: Mohammed Islam
Prerequisites: None

Course Description:
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the internet. You use the internet every day, and in this house we permit you to "look under the hood" of the internet. By taking this course you will have a better appreciation of how computer networks work and how your computer communicates over the internet. [More Info]

CSE at South by Southwest

U-M attended the 2016 South by Southwest festival in Austin, and CSE participated in showing off another round of innovative technologies. South by Southwest began as a small film and music festival and has grown to become one of the biggest arts and technology fests in the country. Spanning two weeks and a half-dozen conferences in Austin, Texas, it brought together executives and creative types from industries ranging from tech to gaming to music to movies. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chesney, David  Undergraduate Students  

Fall 2016: Electric Distribution Systems

Course No.: EECS 598-005
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Johanna Mathieu
Prerequisites: EECS 463

Course Description:
This course covers the fundamentals of electric power distribution systems and electric loads. Topics to be covered include introduction to distribution grids, power flow in distribution grids, distribution transformers, fundamentals of electric loads, and electric load modeling. [More Info]

Fall 2016: Hybrid Systems: Specification, Verification and Control

Course No.: EECS 598-002
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Necmiye Ozay
Prerequisites: EECS 562 or (EECS 560 + permission of instructor)

Course Description:
This course will provide a working knowledge of several analysis and design techniques to guarantee safety, reliability and performance of hybrid systems. [More Info]

Fall 2016: Mining Large-Scale Graph Data

Course No.: EECS 598-004
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Danai Koutra
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of linear algebra, programming and machine learning

Course Description:
This course will cover recent methods and algorithms for analyzing large-scale graphs, as well as applications in various domains (e.g., neuroscience, web science, social science, computer networks). The focus will be on scalable and practical methods, and students will have the chance to analyze large-scale datasets. [More Info]

Startup Co-founded by Prof. Kevin Fu Gets NSF Grant

Healthcare security company Virta Laboratories, Inc, co-founded by Prof. Kevin Fu, has received a $750,000 grant from the National Science Foundation Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. Virta Labs provides hardware and software cybersecurity solutions for hospitals. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Entrepreneurship  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

It's Official: Computer Science is #1... and #2!

Computer science is a fast-growing discipline with huge potential for impact, and this is clearly reflected at the University of Michigan in terms of two measurements: the number of declared majors in the undergraduate program, and the employment survey data available from student co-ops, interns, and full-time hires. [Full Story]

UM professors, students lead startup with real-world uses for AI technology

This article profiles Clinc, the artificial intelligence startup founded by Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang with CSE graduate students Michael Laurenzano and Johann Hauswald. Clinc is based in Ann Arbor and uses intelligent personal assistant technology to fuel new applications. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Fall 2016: Power Semiconductor Devices

Course No.: EECS 598-001
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Becky Peterson
Prerequisites: EECS 320 or equivalent or graduate standing

Course Description:
Power devices are at the heart of all modern electronics, from the grid and renewable energy sources to fuel-efficient vehicles and mobile devices. This course will cover semiconductor switches and rectifiers for discrete and integrated power electronics. [More Info]

Fall 2016: Advanced Topics in Electric Drives

Course No.: EECS 598-007
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Heath Hofmann
Prerequisites: EECS 560 (co-requisite)

Course Description:
This course will cover advanced topics in electric drives, such as:

* Nonlinear modeling of electric machines, and subsequent controller design

*Discrete-time control implementations of field-oriented control techniques

*Real-time parameter estimation for online condition monitoring of electric machines

Students will gain hands-on experience with these techniques in the Power and Energy Instructional Laboratory. The course will have a final project where students will design and implement their own control algorithm. [More Info]

Fall 2016: Quantum Nanotechnology

Course No.: EECS 498-002
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Duncan Steel
Prerequisites: MATH 215 and 216, PHYSICS 240, co-req EECS 230 or permission

Course Description:
The development and application of nano-technology is impacting nearly all the fields of engineering, from those who are developing it to those who use it. Future engineers working to design new devices will need a skill set that is considerably broadened to include the behavior of materials and devices when they become sufficiently small. Devices like transistors and quantum well lasers have already forced engineers to understand the impact of Fermi-Dirac statistics and energy quantization on devices. However, the emergent field of nano-technology is revealing that the concepts we have from our current scale devices is no longer adequate to predict correct device experience. Moreover, in this new regime, new physical properties are emerging that may revolutionize how we think of information and its storage, transmission and processing. This course aims to introduce students to basic concepts in quantum physics that our relevant to novel device concepts. The course will explore the new properties of nano-vibrators, quantum LC circuits, the role of loss, the impact of the quantum vacuum on nano-switches, coherent superposition, quantum entanglement and light, one photon at a time. [More Info]

Fall 2016: An Introduction to Networks

Course No.: EECS 498-001
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Vijay Subramanian
Prerequisites: EECS 203 and EECS 301 (or equivalent) recommended

Course Description:
This course serves as an introduction to the broad class of networks: how these networks are connected, how they form, how processes and transactions take place on them, and how they are being transformed and interconnected in the modern world. [More Info]

All CSE News for 2016