Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

CSE Research News

Protean Code Allows Data Center Servers to Adapt to Changing Environments with Breakthrough Compiler Technology

A team of CSE researchers including Prof. Jason Mars, Prof Lingjia Tang, and graduate student Michael Laurenzano has developed Protean Code, a technique which efficiently and continuously transforms the way in which the application programs running in data centers are recompiled in order to adapt to changing compute environments. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Code Compliation  Data Centers  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Scott Mahlke Elected IEEE Fellow for Contributions to Compiler Code Generation and Automatic Processor Customization

CSE Associate Chair and Prof. Scott Mahlke has been named an IEEE Fellow, Class of 2015, "for contributions to compiler code generation and automatic processor customization." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Mahlke, Scott  Parallel Computing  

CS Researchers Introduce New Certificate Authority in Aim to Securely Encrypt Every Website

Computer science researchers including Prof. J. Alex Halderman and CSE graduate student James Kasten have announced Let's Encrypt, a free, automated, and open certificate authority that is intended to bring secure encryption to the entire web. Let's Encrypt was developed with the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Mozilla and will debut in summer 2015. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Networks and Networking  Security (Computing)  Software Lab  

Computer Scientists Win Best Paper Award at ACM IMC for Analysis of the Impact of the Recent Heartbleed Vulnerability

A team of computer scientists including Prof. J. Alex Halderman, CSE graduate student and lead co-author Zakir Durumeric, and CSE graduate students James Kasten and David Adrian, has won a Best Paper Award at the 2014 ACM Internet Measurement Conference for their comprehensive, measurement-based analysis of the impact of the recent Heartbleed vulnerability, and the server operator community's response to it. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Networks and Networking  Security (Computing)  Software Lab  Software Systems  

Yelin Kim Wins Best Student Paper Award at ACM Multimedia 2014 for Research in Facial Emotion Recognition

Yelin Kim has won the Best Student Paper Award at the 22nd ACM International Conference on Multimedia (ACM MM 2014) for her research in facial emotion recognition. The paper, "Say Cheese vs. Smile: Reducing Speech-Related Variability for Facial Emotion Recognition," was co-authored by her advisor, Prof. Emily Mower Provost. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Systems  Mower Provost, Emily  Signal and Image Processing   

John P. Hayes Recognized with SIGDA Pioneering Achievement Award

John P. Hayes, Claude E. Shannon Professor of Engineering Science, has been recognized with the 2014 SIGDA Pioneering Achievement Award "for his pioneering contributions to logic design, fault tolerant computing, and testing." The award was given at ICCAD on Nov. 3 in San Jose. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Hayes, John  

Jia Deng Wins Best Paper Award at ECCV

Prof. Jia Deng and his collaborators have won the Best Paper Award at ECCV for "Large-Scale Object Classification using Label Relation Graphs." It addresses a computer's ability to accurately classify objects in images, which is a fundamental challenge in computer vision research and an important building block for tasks such as localization, detection, and scene parsing. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Deng, Jia  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Shared Memory in Mobile Operating Systems Provides Ingress Point for Hackers

Computer science researchers have exposed a shared memory weakness believed to exist in Android, Windows, and iOS operating systems that could be used to obtain personal information from unsuspecting users. The research team has demonstrated how passwords, photos, and other personal information can be stolen while users use popular mainstream apps. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Security (Computing)  

Researchers Expose Security Flaws in Backscatter X-ray Scanners

A team of security researchers including Prof. J. Alex Halderman and graduate student Eric Wustrow have discovered several security vulnerabilities in the full-body backscatter X-ray scanners that were deployed to U.S. airports between 2009 and 2013. The researchers were able to slip knives, guns, and other contraband past the systems. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Researchers Demo Hack to Seize Control of Municipal Traffic Signal Systems

Computer science researchers working with Prof. J. Alex Halderman have demonstrated that a number of security flaws exist in commonly-deployed networked traffic signal systems that leave the systems vulnerable to attack or manipulation. They presented their findings at the 8th USENIX Workshop on Offensive Technologies. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Can Our Computers Continue to Get Smaller and More Powerful?

In an article in this week's issue of the journal Nature, Prof. Igor Markov reviews limiting factors in the development of computing systems to help determine what is achievable, identifying "loose" limits and viable opportunities for advancements through the use of emerging technologies. His research for this project was funded by the National Science Foundation, the Semiconductor Research Corporation, and the Air Force Research Laboratory. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Markov, Igor  

Vulnerabilities Demonstrated in Traffic Signal Controls

Students in Prof. J. Alex Halderman's recent EECS 588 course, including graduate student Brandon Ghena, have demonstrated vulnerabilities that would allow hackers to take control of municipal traffic light systems. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Barzan Mozafari and Collaborators Chosen for Best Demo at ACM SIGMOD

Prof. Barzan Mozafari and his collaborators have received the Best Demo Award at the 2014 ACM SIGMOD/PODS Conference. The demo was of their Analytical Bootstrap (ABS) System, which enables complex exploratory data analysis on large volumes of data. ABS is described in their paper, ABS: a System for Scalable Approximate Queries with Accuracy Guarantees. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Big Data  Mozafari, Barzan  

Jeremy Gibson Authors Book on Game Design, Prototyping, and Programming

Independent game designer and CSE Lecturer Jeremy Gibson has authored a new book entitled Introduction to Game Design, Prototyping, and Development, which for the first time brings these three disciplines together in a single volume. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Game Design and Development  Gibson, Jeremy  

Audio Story: Dissecting Voices to Find the Hidden Call For Help

This New Tech City Audio Story on wNYC describes work that Prof. Emily Mower Provost is doing in conjunction with psychiatrist Melvin McInnis to use smartphones in detecting the mood swings of patients with bipolar disorder as they talk on smartphones. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Medical diagnosis  Mower Provost, Emily  

Wakefield and Kieras Win Best Paper Award at ICAD 2014

Profs. Gregory Wakefield and David Kieras, along with three coauthors from the Air Force Research Laboratory at the Wright Patterson Air Force Base, received the Best Paper Award at the 20th International Conference on Auditory Display for EPIC Modeling of a Two-Talker CRM Listening Task. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Acoustic Processing  Kieras, David  Wakefield, Gregory H.  

David Kieras Wins a Best Paper Award at CHI 2014

Prof. David Kieras has coauthored Towards Accurate and Practical Predictive Models of Active-Vision-Based Visual Search, which has been selected for a SIGCHI Best of CHI Best Paper Award at the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Kieras, David  Lab-Interactive Systems  

Grant Schoenebeck Selected for Facebook Faculty Award

Prof. Grant Schoenebeck has been selected as the recipient of a Facebook Faculty Award for his work in theoretical computer science and its potential for impact in the area of social networking. He is currently working on better understanding "complex" contagions, which, unlike diseases and rumors, typically require more than one neighbor for infection. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Schoenebeck, Grant  Theory  

Computer Scientists Author Book on Hardware Prefetching

Professor Thomas F. Wenisch and his collaborator Prof. Babak Falsafi of EPFL Switzerland have authored a new book entitled A Primer on Hardware Prefetching, which has been published by Morgan & Claypool as one of their Synthesis Lectures on Computer Architecture. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Wenisch, Thomas  

Robotics Researchers Ready for Automated Vehicle Test Facility

CoE robotics researchers Prof. Edwin Olson of CSE and Prof. Ryan Eustice of NAME will be amongst the first users of the Mobility Transformation Facility, the automated vehicle test facility being built on North Campus. The two will initially use the facility to run tests related to the development of sensing and mapping technology. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  Robotics and Computer Vision  Transportation  

Making Smartphones Smarter: HiJack Adopted for Use in Commercial Product

HiJack, the hardware/software platform for use in creating cubic-inch sensor peripherals for smartphones, has been adopted for use in a product offering by NXP Semiconductors. HiJack was developed under the direction of Prof. Prabal Dutta, and allows for the integration of sensors to a smartphone through the phone's audio jack, making it a universal, low cost interface. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Dutta, Prabal  Mobile Computing  

Researchers Identify Security Risks in Estonian Online Voting System

Ahead of European Parliamentary elections on May 25, an international team of independent experts, including Prof. J. Alex Halderman and CSE graduate students Travis Finkenauer and Drew Springall, has identified major risks in the security of Estonia's Internet voting system and recommended its immediate withdrawal. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Leaders in Ultra Low Power Circuits and Systems Presenting at VLSI Circuits Symposium

Michigan faculty and students will present seven papers at the 2014 Symposium on VLSI Circuits, a number that exceeds any other academic institution or company. The seven papers range from a millimeter-scale wireless imaging system, to a chip that can decipher an image in a manner similar to the human brain, to continued optimization of the circuits we use every day, as well as circuits that will fuel the future Internet of Things. One of the papers, Low Power Battery Supervisory Circuit with Adaptive Battery Health Monitor, has been selected as a Symposium Technical Highlight. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Dutta, Prabal  Flynn, Michael  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Mobile Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  Zhang, Zhengya  

Listening to Bipolar Disorder: Smartphone App Detects Mood Swings via Voice Analysis

U-M researchers, including Prof. Emily Mower Provost, Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja, Research Fellow Zahi Karam, and colleagues at the U-M Health Center, have created a smartphone app that monitors subtle voice qualities during everyday phone conversations to detect early signs of mood changes in people with bipolar disorder. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Machine Learning  Medical diagnosis  Mower Provost, Emily  

Heartbleed: Behind the Scenes at CSE

Computer science researchers at Michigan, including graduate student Zakir Durumeric, used their Internet scanning software to rapidly pinpoint vulnerable servers on the Internet, quantifying the scope of the Heartbleed bug and providing data on when and where servers were patched to repair the flaw. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Startup Virta Labs Wins Ann Arbor SPARK Best of Boot Camp

Virta Laboratories, Inc., the startup co-founded in part by Prof. Kevin Fu and visiting scholar Denis Foo Kune, has been named Best of Boot Camp at the conclusion of Ann Arbor SPARK's Entrepreneurial Boot Camp. Virta Labs delivers malware and anomaly detection on medical devices and process control systems by non-intrusively measuring the power consumption patterns of the machines being protected. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Medical Device Security  Security (Computing)  

Halderman and Lafortune Join TerraSwarm Research Center

Two EECS faculty with expertise in Privacy and Security, J. Alex Halderman and Stephane Lafortune, will join the TerraSwarm Research Center in May. TerraSwarm addresses the huge potential, as well as the risks, of pervasive integration of smart, networked sensors and actuators into the connected world. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lafortune, Stephane  Security (Computing)  

Michael Lewis says the market is rigged. But his Flash Boys rigged themselves.

CSE graduate student Elaine Wah writes in The Guardian that not only has the high frequency trading arms race rigged the stock markets, but strategies such as latency arbitrage have created the potential to reduce trading gains for all market participants, regardless of their speed of access. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Researchers Win Best Paper Award at ISPASS 2014

A team of researchers including CSE PhD candidate Anthony Gutierrez, Dr. Ron Dreslinski, and Bredt Family Professor in Engineering Trevor Mudge has won the Best Paper Award at the 2014 IEEE International Symposium on Performance Analysis of Systems and Software (ISPASS) for "Sources of Error in Full-System Simulation." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Dreslinski, Ron  Graduate Students  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Mudge, Trevor  

Technological Singularity Passes, Unnoticed Until Now

Apr. 1, 2014 -- The technological singularity - that moment in time at which artificial intelligence surpasses the point of human intelligence - appears to have occurred just over three weeks ago, according to a researcher at the University of Michigan. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Michael Wellman Recognized with ACM/SIGAI Autonomous Agents Research Award

Prof. Michael P. Wellman has been selected by the ACM Special Interest Group on Artificial Intelligence as the recipient of its 2014 Autonomous Agents Research Award. The award acknowledges the contributions of outstanding researchers in the field of autonomous agents, and is granted each year to one individual whose work is influencing and setting the direction for the field. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Electronic Commerce  Wellman, Michael  

New Center Develops Technologies to Help Youths with Disabilities

A $4.5 million federal grant will allow U-M researchers to explore how technology can be used to help young adults with spinal cord dysfunction and neurodevelopmental disabilities to improve their health and become more independent as they mature. Prof. Edmund Durfee is the center's co-director. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Ackerman, Mark  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Durfee, Edmund  Health  

Prabal Dutta Selected for NSF CAREER Award

Prof. Prabal Dutta has been awarded an NSF CAREER award for his research project, "Scalable Sensor Infrastructure for Sustainably Managing the Built Environment." Prof. Dutta will develop advanced sensor technologies that will help to create progress toward Federal sustainability goals that mandate that 50% of U.S. commercial buildings become net-zero energy by 2050. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Dutta, Prabal  Remote Sensing  

Jia Deng Wins Marr Prize at ICCV

Prof. Jia Deng has won the Marr Prize at ICCV for his paper, "From Large Scale Image Categorization to Entry-Level Categories." Named for neuroscientist David Marr, the Marr Prize is a prestigious biennial award and is considered one of the top honors for a computer vision researcher. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Deng, Jia  Robotics and Computer Vision  

H.V. Jagadish Awarded Gates Foundation Grant to Leverage Data for Social Good

Prof. H.V. Jagadish, the Bernard A. Galler Collegiate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, has won a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation for a project that uses big data to achieve social good as a part of the Foundation's Grand Challenge Explorations. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Big Data  Jagadish, HV  

Cheating on Exams with Smartwatches

In this Freedom to Tinker blog entry, CS undergrad Alex Migicovsky discusses a smartphone app for collaborative cheating and how increasingly small and inconspicuous technology form factors will pose future testing and broader security challenges. Alex's work in this area has been advised by Dr. Jeff Ringenberg and Prof. J. Alex Halderman. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Security (Computing)  Undergraduate Students  

Rada Mihalcea to Study Physiological and Linguistic Signals of Human Behavior

Prof. Rada Mihalcea is co-PI for a new two-year grant from the National Science Foundation that will explore a new generation of computational tools for joint modeling of physiological and linguistic signals of human behavior with a focus on deception detection. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Computational Linguistics  Mihalcea, Rada  

Dragomir Radev Assembles Two-Volume Collection of NACLO Linguistics Puzzles

Prof. Dragomir Radev has edited Puzzles in Logic, Languages, and Computation, a two-volume set of the best English-language problems created for students competing in the North American Computational Linguistics Olympiad. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Computational Linguistics  Radev, Dragomir  

Rada Mihalcea Selected for NSF INSPIRE Award

Prof. Rada Mihalcea has been awarded an INSPIRE (Integrated NSF Support Promoting Interdisciplinary Research and Education) Award from the National Science Foundation for an interdisciplinary project on tracking cultural diversity. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Computational Linguistics  Mihalcea, Rada  

Iranian Internet Censorship System Profiled for First Time

Prof. J. Alex Halderman and two anonymous coauthors have published the first peer-reviewed technical study of Iran's national censorship infrastructure, revealing much about the extent and nature of one of the largest and most sophisticated Internet censorship regimes in the world. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Edwin Olson Awarded DARPA Young Faculty Award

Prof. Edwin Olson has been awarded a DARPA Young Faculty Award for "Mutual Modeling for Human/Robot Teaming with Minimal Communications," his research in the area of autonomous intelligent robotics. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Download ZMap and Scan the Entire Internet in Less Than 45 Minutes

Three U-M computer science researchers have released ZMap, a new open-source tool that can perform a scan of the entire public IPv4 address space on the Internet in less than 45 minutes - over 1000 times faster than with previous tools. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Networks and Networking  Security (Computing)  

New Grant: Reducing Computer Viruses in Health Networks

Prof. Kevin Fu and Research Prof. Michael Bailey will establish methods to scientifically study the extent of malware in hospital networks under the new five-year Trustworthy Health and Wellness project that has received $10 million from the National Science Foundation. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Security (Computing)  

Two Papers by CSE Researchers Chosen as IEEE Micro Top Picks

Two papers authored by U-M computer science researchers have been selected for IEEE Micro's Top Picks from the 2012 Computer Architecture Conferences. Top Picks is an annual special edition of Micro magazine that acknowledges the most significant research papers from computer architecture conferences in the past year based on novelty and potential for long-term impact. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Narayanasamy, Satish  Papaefthymiou, Marios  Parallel Computing  Wenisch, Thomas  

Elliot Soloway Selected for Google App Engine Education Award

Prof. Elliot Soloway, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and Professor in Computer Science and Engineering, School of Education, and School of Information, has received a Google App Engine Education Award to support the development of the WeCollabrify Mobile Platform. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Lab-Interactive Systems  Soloway, Elliot  

Researchers Show That High-Frequency Trading Tactic Lowers Investor Profits

Research conducted by Prof. Michael Wellman and CSE doctoral student Elaine Wah illustrates how high-frequency trading strategies that exploit today's fragmented equity markets have led to a technical arms race and reduce investor profits overall. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Electronic Commerce  Graduate Students  Wellman, Michael  

Researchers Work Recognized Amongst Notable Computing Books and Articles of 2012

Research conducted by Michigan computer scientists has been selected for ACM Computing Review's Notable Computing Books and Articles of 2012. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Fourth Annual Data Mining Workshop Brings Together Close to 200 Researchers

Close to 200 researchers from across the University of Michigan and from industry gathered in the Bob and Betty Beyster Building on North Campus for the fourth U-M Workshop on Data Mining in order to make connections and share their experiences and results. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Big Data  Cafarella, Michael  Radev, Dragomir  

Security Risks Found in Sensors for Heart Devices, Consumer Electronics

An international team of researchers including Prof. Kevin Fu has demonstrated that the type of sensors that pick up the rhythm of a beating heart in implanted cardiac defibrillators and pacemakers are vulnerable to tampering. The researchers were able to forge an erratic heartbeat with radio frequency electromagnetic waves in controlled laboratory conditions. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Medical Device Security  Security (Computing)  

Workshop Brings Together Industry and Researchers on Medical Device Security Challenges

Over 60 professionals from medical device manufacturers and level-I trauma centers and security researchers attended the two-day Archimedes Workshop run by Prof. Kevin Fu through his Archimedes Research Center for Medical Device Security. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Medical Device Security  Security (Computing)