Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

ECE News

2017 EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards

The EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards are presented annually to faculty members for their outstanding accomplishments in teaching, research, and service. The recipients of the 2017 EECS Outstanding Achievement Award are Marcus Darden, Almantas Galvanauskas, Atul Prakash, and Euisik Yoon. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Darden, Marcus  Galvanauskas, Almantas  Prakash, Atul  Yoon, Euisik  

Sensors from Head to Toe Todd Coleman Makes Measuring Health Simpler

Prof. Todd Coleman (BSE CE, EE ) thinks theres a way on the horizon for patients in need of regular monitoring to get out of their hospital beds. His group at the University of California San Diego is tackling the challenging problem of getting high-fidelity monitoring to work affordably at home. To answer this need, he and his group have created sensors as thin as skin that can gather data from nearly anywhere. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Flexible electronics  Health  Sensors  Winful, Herbert  

Becky Peterson Receives NSF CAREER Award for Research in Amorphous Semiconductors for Next Generation Electronics

Prof. Becky Peterson was awarded an NSF CAREER award for her research project entitled Band Engineering in Amorphous Semiconductors." She will develop new alloys of amorphous oxide semiconductors with precisely tuned semiconductor energy band structures in order to enable new categories of electronic and opto-electronic devices. This research is applicable to the next generation of high-power electronics and deep ultraviolet optoelectronic devices, with specific applications in renewable energy and health care. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Optoelectronics  Peterson, Becky (R. L.)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Sustainability  

LNF User Symposium - Sharing Ideas and Celebrating Innovation

The 2016 Lurie Nanofabrication Facility (LNF) User Symposium highlighted the cutting-edge research enabled by Michigan's world-class facility. The Symposium included technical talks, a poster session, and the opportunity for discussion and networking. Four ECE grad students won prizes for their posters, and Prof. Mark Kushner delivered the event's keynote address. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Kushner, Mark J.  LNF  Plasma Science and Engineering   

Kamal Sarabandi | Remote Sensing Science and Technology

Prof. Kamal Sarabandi delivered a Geoscience Remote Sensing Seminar, titled "Remote Sensing Science and Technology in Support of Exploration and Safe Utilization of Energy Resources." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Mark Kushner | The Role of Plasma Modeling

Prof. Mark Kushner delivered the Keynote Address at the 2016 LNF Users Symposium, titled The Role of Plasma Modeling in the Innovation Cycle for Nanofabrication. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kushner, Mark J.  Plasma Science and Engineering   

New Courses Offered by ECE: Winter 2017

As technology changes and advances, so does the range of courses offered by our faculty. The following courses being offered to students for the Winter 2017 term include completely new courses as well as nearly-new courses that may soon become a regular part of the curriculum. They are all being offered by faculty uniquely qualified to teach the courses. The faculty bring extensive experience based on their own research in these areas. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Avestruz, Al-Thaddeus  Berenson, Dmitry  Course  Forrest, Stephen  Gilchrist, Brian E.  Grbic, Anthony  Hiskens, Ian  Islam, Mohammed  Kira, Mackillo  Pradhan, S. Sandeep  Revzen, Shai  Scott, Clayton D.  Wakefield, Gregory H.  

EE Student Noah Mitchell-Ward Earns PES Scholarship to Support Studies in Renewable Power

Noah Mitchell-Ward, undergraduate electrical engineering student, has been named a future power and energy leader by the IEEE Power & Energy Society, which recently awarded him a Power & Energy Society (PES) Scholarship for the 2016-17 academic year. This $2000 scholarship recognizes outstanding students committed to exploring the power and energy field. Noah is interested in renewable energy sources, and hopes to work with solar or wind generation and battery energy storage. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hiskens, Ian  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  Mathieu, Johanna  Power & Energy  Undergraduate Students  

EE Student Leonard Kapiloff Earns PES Scholarship to Support Studies in Secure, Sustainable Grid

Leonard Kapiloff, undergraduate electrical engineering student, has been named a future power and energy leader by the IEEE Power & Energy Society, which recently awarded him a Power and Energy Society (PES) Scholarship for the 2016-17 academic year. This $2000 scholarship recognizes outstanding students committed to exploring the power and energy field. Leonard is also earning a minor in Energy Science and Policy. Leonard wants to work in the energy industry towards a more sustainable and secure electric grid. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hiskens, Ian  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  Mathieu, Johanna  Power & Energy  Undergraduate Students  

EE Student Arun Nagpal develops new ENG 100 section to spotlight space science

For incoming freshman, Engineering (ENGR) 100 provides an initial glimpse into the world of collegiate engineering design. Starting this upcoming winter semester, a new ENGR 100 section will be implemented that spotlights previously under-represented topics: atmospheric and space science. Arun Nagpal, electrical engineering junior and co-President of SEDS, saw an opportunity to increase freshman engagement in space research through hands-on course-work. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Space technology  Undergraduate Students  

Semyon Meerkov Elected Foreign Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences

On October 27, 2016, Professor Meerkov was unanimously elected as a Foreign Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences for his contributions to Systems Science and Automation. The Academy, established in 1774, is the highest scientific institution in Russia. His current work is centered on production systems engineering, quasilinear control, and on the theory of resilient monitoring and control systems, which degrade gracefully under cyber-attacks. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Meerkov, Semyon M.  

Congratulations New ECE PhDs: 2015-2016

Electrical and Computer Engineering conferred 45 PhD degrees in the Fall 2015, Summer 2016, and Winter 2016 semesters. Congrats to all of our outstanding new graduates! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Graduate Students  

Winter 2017: Theory and Practice of Data Compression

Course No.: EECS 553
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: David Neuhoff
Prerequisites: EECS 501, Probability and Random Processes

Course Description:
Data compression (also called source coding) is the process of creating binary representations of data from sources such as speech, images, audio, video or text. This course gives a broad introduction to the theory and practice of lossy compression, where perfect reproductions are not possible or require too many bits (for example for speech, images, audio, video), and some introduction to lossless compression, where perfect reproductions are required (for example for text or other discrete data). Particular attention is paid to compressing images, speech and video.

The lossy compression methods include a number of quantization techniques: scalar, vector, predictive (e.g. DPCM), transform (e.g., JPEG, MPEG, H.26X), subband (e.g., MP3, wavelet, JPEG2000), predictive and adaptive quantizers (e.g., CELP as used in cell phones to compress speech). The theory is mainly high-resolution quantization theory.

The lossless compression methods include Huffman, conditional, run-length, Lempel-Ziv, and arithmetic codes. The theory is entropy theory.

Students gain experience in data compression via a term project.

The course is oriented toward first and second year graduate students. No previous introduction to data compression is presumed. [More Info]

Winter 2017: Channel Coding Theory and Applications

Course No.: EECS 650
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Hessam Mahdavifar
Prerequisites: (Advisory) EECS 501 and MATH 419

Course Description:
Coding theory is the science of the systematic study of structured sets called codes, providing reliable communications and data storage in noisy environments. Today, error-correcting codes are among the fundamental parts of any communication system and data storage system.

The classical approach to construct such structured sets has been to consider certain algebraic objects such as vector spaces and finite fields. In the first part of this course, we cover some required background to study linear binary block codes and algebraic codes over finite fields. In particular, some of the well-known classical codes such as Reed-Solomon codes and BCH codes are studied.

Another approach to construct structured sets or codes has been to exploit properties of certain graphical models and trellises. This approach was essentially born by the invention of convolutional codes in 50s but was mostly discarded till 90s due to the lack of computational power. The invention of turbo codes and the re-discovery of low-density parity-check codes in 90s led to the birth of a new subfield of coding theory called modern coding theory. In the second part of the course, we study some essential aspects of modern coding theory.

A classical goal of information theory set by Shannon 70 years ago has been to construct explicit codes with practical encoder and decoder that achieve the fundamental limit of channel capacity. This goal was finally accomplished by the invention of polar codes in 2009. This has revolutionized the field of coding and information theory as many open problems have been solved using polar codes and the new notion of channel polarization. Besides being asymptotically optimal, polar codes have also been shown to perform very well at short block length which has led to their adoption in 5G wireless communication systems. In the third part of the course, we study polar codes and channel polarization together with practical aspects of their implementation. [More Info]

Professor Emerita Lynn Conway Elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Professor Emerita Lynn Conway has been elected Fellow of the American Assocation for the Advancement of Science. Fellows are recognized for their efforts toward advancing science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished. Prof. Conway has made groundbreaking and fundamental contributions to Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) design and production of integrated circuits. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Conway, Lynn  

Kamal Sarabandi Elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Kamal Sarabandi, Rufus S. Teesdale Professor of Engineering, has been elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Fellows are recognized for their efforts toward advancing science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished. Kamal Sarabandi's contributions have shaped the remote sensing radar imaging field for over the past quarter century. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

ECE Team Receives Distinguished Diversity Leaders Team Award

A seven member team from Electrical and Computer Engineering has received the Distinguished Diversity Leaders Team Award, established to shine a light on those staff members who have shown extraordinary commitment and dedication to diversity at U-M. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  

Inspiring a New Generation of Women Engineers in Liberia

Six women engineering students from Liberia traveled to the U.S. to attend the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) Women in Engineering 2016 conference, under the sponsorship of the Excellence in Higher Education for Liberian Development (EHELD) program and U-M-SWE. They spoke of their passion to improve their country through engineering, as well as the difficulties of being female engineers in their country. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  Winful, Herbert  

$1.1 million grant to develop robot emergency response capabilities

The Office of Naval Research has awarded Prof. Dmitry Berenson $1.1 million to help advance a robot's ability to walk over unstable ground and deal with tangles in string, rope or wire. One of the new abilities that Berenson and his group will help robots attain is navigating unfamiliar environments by reusing previous experience from similar environments. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Berenson, Dmitry  Robotics  

Stephen Forrest Receives IEEE Jun-ichi Nishizawa Medal for Pioneering Work in OLEDs

Stephen Forrest, Peter A. Franken Distinguished University Professor of Engineering and Paul G. Goebel Professor of Engineering, is the co-recipient of the 2017IEEE Jun-ichi Nishizawa Medal, along with Ching W. Tang and Mark Thompson, For their pioneering work on organic devices, leading to organic light-emitting diode displays. The Jun-ichi Nishizawa Medal is given for outstanding contributions to material and device science and technology, including practical application. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  

Video: The Lurie Nanofabrication Facility

The Lurie Nanofabrication Facility is a state-of- the-art cleanroom that provides advanced micro- and nano-fabrication equipment and expertise to internal and external researchers. The LNF enables cutting edge research, including semiconductor materials and devices, electronic circuits, solid-state lighting, energy, biotechnology, medical devices and unconventional materials and processing technologies. Learn more in this video. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  LNF  Lu, Wei  Najafi, Khalil  Peterson, Becky (R. L.)  

CubeWorks: Solving Problems with the Worlds Smallest and Lowest-power Computers

CubeWorks, founded by the team at University of Michigan that developed the Michigan Micro Mote (M3), the worlds smallest computer, has been flying under the radar since late in 2013. This startup company specializes in the worlds smallest and lowest-power sensing technology. With its first outside funding from Intel (see the press release), the CEO of CubeWorks is now looking two years into the future, when he hopes to be manufacturing millimeter-scale computing devices for their first customers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Blaauw, David  Dutta, Prabal  Entrepreneurship  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sensors  Sylvester, Dennis  Technology Transfer  Wentzloff, David  Wireless Communications  

Ushering in the Next Generation of Flat-Panel Displays and Medical Imagers

Research that is expected to directly impact the future of the flat-panel display and imager industries has been selected as an Editor's Choice by the Journal of Solid-State Electronics. The article, co-authored by Prof. Jerzy Kanicki, ECE graduate student Chumin Zhao, and Dr. Mitsuru Nakata, describes a new technology that may help usher in the next generation of flat-panel displays and imagers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Displays  Kanicki, Jerzy  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Winter 2017: Advanced Topics and the Design of Power Electronics

Course No.: EECS 598
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Al Avestruz
Prerequisites: EECS 418 and EECS 460 or equivalents

Course Description:
This class will address some advanced topics and techniques in power electronics and the craft of design through case studies. [More Info]

Winter 2017: EECS 598 - Optics and Quantum Spectroscopy of Semiconductors

Course No.: EECS 598
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Mack Kira
Prerequisites: PHYSICS 240 and (EECS 334 or 434 or 320 or 540)

Course Description:
This lecture will provide a pragmatic and brief introduction to solidstate theory, manybody formalism, and semiconductor quantum optics to explore pragmatic possibilities for nanotechology. [More Info]
Related Topics:  Course  

Winter 2017: Waves & Imaging in Random Media

Course No.: EECS 598
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: John Schotland
Prerequisites: Basic partial differential equations; some knowledge of probability theory

Course Description:
This is a special topics course. The focus is on the theory of wave propagation in inhomogeneous media in various asymptotic regimes including: (i) geometrical optics of high-frequency waves (ii) homogenization of low-frequency waves in periodic and random media (iii) radiative transport and diusion theory for high-frequency waves in random media. Applications to inverse problems in imaging will be considered. The necessary tools from asymptotic analysis, scattering theory and probability will be developed as needed. The course is meant to be accessible to graduate students in mathematics, physics and engineering. [More Info]
Related Topics:  Course  

Nader Behdad Receives the Inaugural ECE Rising Star Alumni Award for his Transformative Research in Antennas

Nader Behdad knew from a young age that he wanted to make antennas for a living. The son of an electrical engineer working for a national TV broadcasting company, he often had the chance to accompany his father to work. Now the inaugural recipient of the ECE Rising Star Alumni Award, which recognizes younger ECE alums who have achieved early success within their careers, Prof. Behdad (MS PhD EE 03 06) has tackled some of the toughest problems in antenna research. But unlike his father's work, for his applications, they need to be very small - small enough, even, to be used to treat cancer. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Wide-ranging ECE Research Presented at 2016 Engineering Graduate Symposium

Systems to study cancer stem cells, new methods to remotely measure snow and ice thickness, radar for autonomous vehicles, navigation systems that don't rely on GPS, nanowire lasers, and methods to model lithium-ion batteries were just a few of the many winning projects presented by ECE students at the 2016 Engineering Graduate Symposium. Thirteen alumni returned to judge the posters and meet with students. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Recent Alum Startup Wins $25,000 at Accelerate Michigan Competition

Movellus Circuits, co-founded by alumnus Muhammad Faisal (MSE PHD EE 2011 2014), won $25,000 awards at the Accelerate Michigan Innovation Competition in Detroit, in the University Research Highlight and People's Choice categories, respectively. Movellus' prize money will go toward more protection for the intellectual property behind its semiconductor chip optimization software, which has already netted three major customers and significant interest from Silicon Valley. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Entrepreneurship  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Wentzloff, David  

Video: Prof. Cindy Finelli and Engineering Education Research

Prof. Finelli is currently Director of Engineering Education Research in the College of Engineering, and she was founding director at the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching in Engineering at Michigan, which supports college-wide initiatives in engineering teaching and learning. Her own research focuses on how faculty make decisions about what theyre doing in the classroom, how students understand engineering concepts, and how a flexible classroom influences both teaching and learning. Watch a new video about her and her work. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Engineering Education  Finelli, Cynthia  

Winter 2017: Organic Electronics: Fundamentals

Course No.: EECS 598
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Steve Forrest
Prerequisites: Senior level quantum physics, electricity and magnetism

Course Description:
In this course, we will trace the history, science and modern applications of organic electronic technology. [More Info]
Related Topics:  Course  

Liz Dreyer Earns An Outstanding Collegiate Member Award for Years of SWE Leadership

ECE PhD student Liz Dreyer was awarded the Outstanding Collegiate Member award by the Society of Women Engineers, "for leadership and innovative efforts to grow SWE's presence on campus, particularly among graduate students, and for advancing the overall interests of women in STEM fields across the globe." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  Rand, Stephen  Student Teams and Organizations  

Winter 2017: Formal Verification of Hardware and Software Systems

Course No.: EECS 598
Credit Hours:
Instructor: Karem Sakallah
Prerequisites:

Course Description:
This course explores the latest advances in automated proof methods for checking whether or not certain properties hold under all possible executions of a complex hardware or software system. [More Info]

Winter 2017: Multidisciplinary Capstone Design Project - Supplemental Information

Course No.: EECS498-006 and EECS 498-007
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Anthony Grbic or Greg Wakefield
Prerequisites: See PDF

Course Description:
See attached PDF [More Info]

Winter 2017: Multidisciplinary Capstone (MDE) Design Pilot

Course No.: EECS 498
Credit Hours: 3 or 4 credits
Instructor: Brian Gilchrist
Prerequisites:

Course Description:
EECS students, together with ME and MSE students, work on common, interesting, significant major design experience (MDE) projects. This pilot douse is about providing students real-world, multidisciplinary design project opportunities to satisfy their MDE requirement and for ECE masters students interested in meaningful project experiences.

For WN17, we will have several projects with a biomedical focus as well as energy, sports, spaceflight, and other areas needing EECS students (e.g. sensor/electronics, embedded systems, controls, and wireless). Please contact Prof. Gilchrist with questions. [More Info]

Winter 2017: Internet Foundations

Course No.: EECS 398
Credit Hours: 1 credit
Instructor: Mohammed Islam
Prerequisites: ENGR 101 or EECS 183

Course Description:
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the internet. You use the internet every day, and in this course we permit you to look under the hood of the internet. We start by reviewing the differences between various applications, such as world wide web, skype, and Bit-Torrent. The 4-layer internet model will be explained, which includes the application, transport, network and link layers. Internet protocol and TCP/IP communication will be reviewed, along with a detailed discussion of how packet switching and routers work. The link and physical layer description will include explanations of how WiFi and Ethernet networks work [More Info]
Related Topics:  Course  

The Lurie Nanofabrication Facility Gets a New Director

Prof. Wei Lu has been named the new director of the Lurie Nanofabrication Facility (LNF), effective September 1, 2016. The LNF is a world class cleanroom facility, open to the public, with over 13,500 sq. ft. of state-of-the-art cleanroom space that provides researchers the ability to fabricate a sweeping array of solid-state materials, devices, circuits, and microsystems using silicon, compound semiconductors, organic, and other emerging materials. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  LNF  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Lu, Wei  

Winter 2017: Motion Planning

Course No.: EECS 598-003
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Dmitry Berenson
Prerequisites: A linear algebra class and significant programming experience

Course Description:
This course will cover the major topics of motion planning including (but not limited to) planning for manipulation with robot arms and hands, mobile robot path planning with non-holonomic constraints, multi-robot path planning, high-dimensional sampling-based planning, and planning on constraint manifolds. Students will implement motion planning algorithms in open-source frameworks, read recent literature in the field, and complete a project that draws on the course material. [More Info]
Related Topics:  Course  

Winter 2017: Social Computing Systems

Course No.: EECS 498-002
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Walter Lasecki
Prerequisites: EECS 493 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
This course will be based on reading from the social computing research literature. Practical projects will give students experience using and creating online social computing platforms. A significant team-based final project component will let students gain experience designing and building the types of systems we will study. Students will select a topic, and then propose, design, and build a real system. [More Info]

Winter 2017: Hands On Robotics

Course No.: EECS 498
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Shai Revzen
Prerequisites: MATH 216 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
Take Hands On Robitics, a design course where you learn robotics by building robots using the CKBot modular robot system! Covering concepts in robotics from kinematics, control, to programming. [More Info]
Related Topics:  Course  

Winter 2017: Quantum Information, Probability and Computing

Course No.: EECS 598
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Sandeep Pradhan
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Course Description:
Extended introduction and overview of the field of quantum information, quantum probability and quantum computing [More Info]
Related Topics:  Course  

Winter 2017: Grid Integration of Renewable Energy Sources

Course No.: EECS 498/598
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Ian Hiskens
Prerequisites: EECS 215 or EECS 314

Course Description:
This course will consider large-scale integration of renewable generation in electricity grids. [More Info]
Related Topics:  Course  

Winter 2017: Intro Distributed Systems

Course No.: EECS 498-003
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Harsha Madhyastha
Prerequisites: EECS 482

Course Description:
In this class, you will learn the core principles and techniques that apply across various scenarios to maximize performance, reliability, efficiency, etc. [More Info]

Winter 2017: Information Science

Course No.: EECS 398-001
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Clayton Scott
Prerequisites: MATH 116 and ENGR 101 or equivalent

Course Description:
This course develops the theory of information, and applies that theory to understand several modern technologies for information processing and analysis. [More Info]

Meera Sampath | The Art & the Science of Innovation

Sampath (PhD EE:S 95) earned the 2016 CoE Alumni Society Merit Award for ECE. She is Vice President for Innovation and Business Transformation for Xerox, Corp. In 2009, she became the first director of the Xerox Research Innovation Hub in India where she was responsible for overseeing its creation as well as guiding its research agenda and establishing Open Innovation partnerships. Check out Meera's talk. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Michael Stonebraker | The Land Sharks are on the Squawk Box

Michael Stonebraker (MSE EE 66, PhD CICE 71) received the 2016 CoE Alumni Medal Award. Stonebraker invented many of the concepts that are used in almost all modern database management systems and founded multiple successful database companies based on his pioneering work. He received the Turing Award "for fundamental contributions to the concepts and practices underlying modern database systems." Check out the talk he delivered on campus [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Databases  

MHacks Win Propels Student Virtual Reality Startup, Focused on Child Therapy and 3-D Gaming

Propelled by a win at MHacks, EE major Duncan Abbot and English major Paul Stefanski co-founded the startup company Gwydion, a virtual and augmented reality software development company. Early projects range from therapy in children's hospitals to helping materials scientists study 3-D crystals. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  Virtual Reality  

Michael Flynn Earns U-M Faculty Recognition Award

Prof. Michael Flynn has received a Faculty Recognition Award for his accomplishments in research, teaching, and service to the University. Prof. Flynn is one of the world's premier scholars in the area of analog and mixed-signal integrated circuits and systems, analog-to-digital conversion (ADC), and other interface circuits. His pioneering research and designs have improved the performance and energy efficiency of analog-digital interfaces and transformed the field. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Flynn, Michael  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  

U-M to build $75-million robotics hub

Robotic technologies for air, sea, and roads, and for factories, hospitals, and homes will have tailored lab space in the University of Michigan's planned Robotics Laboratory. Prof. Jessy Grizzle has been named director of robotics at U-M, and is leading the new facility's planning and development. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics  

Having Fun with ECE

Students, alumni, faculty, and friends came together for games and exciting displays at this year's Family Fun Night. Attendees of all ages brought the EECS atrium to life in an evening of science, robots, and more. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Diversity and Outreach  

All ECE News for 2017