Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

ECE News

Stephen Forrest Receives 2015 Distinguished University Innovator Award

Stephen Forrest, Paul G. Goebel Professor of Engineering, has been awarded the 2015 U-M Distinguished University Innovator Award. Prof. Forrest is widely acknowledged as one of the most successful academic inventors and entrepreneurs today. He has participated in the founding of 5 companies which have generated more than 1,000 jobs, holds 271 patents, and published more than 540 papers which have received more than 85,000 citations in Google Scholar. During his tenure as U-M's Vice President for Research, he was responsible for several key initiatives that helped make Michigan a leader in tech transfer. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

U-M Develops Controls for Bipedal Robots with Model-Based Design

Developing a two-legged robot capable of walking and running like a human is a key goal for robotics researchers. In 2011, Professor Jessy Grizzle and a small team of Ph.D. students advanced toward that goal with MABEL, a bipedal robot that could run a nine-minute mile and regain its balance after negotiating an eight-inch step. When MABEL's successor, MARLO, needed new coding, the researchers moved away from hand-coding, and used Model-Based Design with MATLAB and Simulink to speed up the development of real-time control systems for MARLO and other bipedal robots. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Michael Stonebraker Receives ACM Turing Award

Michael Stonebraker (MS EE '66, PhD CICE '71) has been named the recipient of the 2014 ACM A.M. Turing Award for fundamental contributions to the concepts and practices underlying modern database systems. The ACM Turing Award, widely considered the Nobel Prize of Computing, carries a $1 million prize with financial support provided by Google, Inc. It is named for Alan M. Turing, the British mathematician who articulated the mathematical foundation and limits of computing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Cheng Zhang Awarded Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship for Research on Nanophotonic Materials and Devices

Cheng Zhang, a 5th year Ph.D. student in Electrical Engineering, has been awarded a Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to support his doctoral research in new optical materials and device concepts for future optoelectronic devices. Key to one facet of Cheng's research is his investigation of a new kind of silver film, aluminum-doped silver (Al-doped Ag), for device fabrication. In addition, Cheng is investigating nano-size metamaterials for use in optical spectrum filtering and polarization/direction control. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Grbic, Anthony  Guo, L. Jay  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Norris, Theodore B.  Optics and Photonics  Optoelectronics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Fall 2015: EECS 498: Control of Manufacturing Systems

Course No.: EECS 498-001
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Semyon Meerkov
Prerequisites: Elementary probability theory

Course Description:
Manufacturing is a major source of national wealth. Losing manufacturing, a country is losing its wealth. Until recently, methods of design and control of manufacturing systems has been based on "weak" engineering - experience, common sense, and, in some cases, simulations. Efficient manufacturing requires more: rigorous analytical methods. Such methods have emerged during the last 25 years. The results obtained, with emphasis on control and management, will be discussed in the course.

The course is directed towards undergraduate students from all CoE departments interested in careers involving design/manufacturing of products, e.g. automobiles, aircraft, semiconductors, computer/communication devices, etc. The skill acquired should make the students knowledgable in various facets of manufacturing and marketable as engineering managers of manufacturing operations. [More Info]

Michigan Micro Mote (M3) Makes History

Michigan Micro Mote (M3), the worlds smallest computer, is taking its place among other revolutionary accomplishments in the history of computing at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA. Measuring in at less than a half a centimeter, it is a fully autonomous computing system that acts as a smart sensing system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Dutta, Prabal  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sensors  Sylvester, Dennis  Wentzloff, David  

2015 CoE Towner Prize for Outstanding Graduate Student Instructors

Each year the College of Engineering awards the Towner Prize for Outstanding Graduate Student Instructors (GSIs) to the top graduate student instructors throughout the College of Engineering. In 2015, three of the four awards went to students in EECS. The winners are Jonathan Beaumont, Michael Benson, and Mai Le. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

EECS Undergraduate Student Awards

Students, parents, and faculty gathered on Friday, March 13, 2015 to celebrate the achievements of EECS students who earned special awards for academic achievement, research, service, or entrepreneurial activities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

Two ECE Alums Make Top Semiconductor CEOs List

Two ECE alumni were recognized in an Electronics Weekly list of 2014's topsemiconductor CEOs. Syed B. Ali (MSE Electrical Engieneering), founder, president, and CEO of Cavium, Inc. and Steve Mollenkopf (MSE Electrical Engineering), CEO of Qualcomm, Inc. took two of the list's top ten spots. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Yi-Chin Wu Receives ProQuest Distinguished Dissertation Award for Research in Network Security

Yi-Chin Wu (MSE PhD EE:Sys 11 14) received the ProQuest Distinguished Dissertation Award for 2014 for her dissertation, Verification enforcement for opacity security property. Her research brings Discrete Event Control Theory to the analysis and design of secure systems. Dr. Wu says that we can no longer solve security and privacy threats by only examining the implementation of each specific system. To proactively design general secure systems, we need to address security in a theoretical approach. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Diversity and Outreach  Networks and Networking  Security (Computing)  

Mark Kushner Awarded 2015 IEEE NPSS Charles K. Birdsall Award

Mark Kushner, George I. Haddad Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, has been awarded the 2015 IEEE NPSS Charles K. Birdsall Award from the Nuclear & Plasma Sciences Society for his outstanding contributions in computational nuclear and plasma science. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kushner, Mark J.  

Dave Neuhoff Receives Distinguished Graduate Mentor Award

Dave Neuhoff, Joseph E. and Anne P. Rowe Professor of Electrical Engineering, has been honored with a 2015 Rackham Distinguished Graduate Mentor Award for his sustained efforts as advisor, teacher, advocate, sponsor, and role model to doctoral students. Prof. Neuhoff's influence has been felt both within his own graduate research group, and across the entire department. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  Neuhoff, David L.  

Alumnus Erin Teague Listed Among 25 Women to Know in 2015

Erin Teague (BSE CE '04) was listed in Rolling Out Magazine as one of the top 25 woman we should know in 2015. Erin is the director of product management at Yahoo! The article, part of a celebration of International Women's History Month, describes the barriers she's broken in the industry. Previously, she was named among the 100 Coolest People in Tech by Business Insider. (Check out a previous Q&A with Erin for more in-depth info here.) [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Diversity and Outreach  Women in Computing  

Urging STEM Support in Washington, DC (Iverson Bell and Michigan Space Grant Consortium)

Iverson Bell (right), a doctoral student in electrical engineering, talks with Dan Jourdan, legislative director for Rep. Sander Levin, D-Royal Oak, about wire that could be used to power micro-satellite propulsion. Representatives of the Michigan Space Grant Consortium part of a national NASA-funded program aimed at increasing the number of students pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering and math were in Washington, D.C., recently to urge support. U-M manages the Space Grant program in Michigan. (Photo by Mike Waring, Washington Office)
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Alumnus Steve Dail Voted Teacher of the Year in Farmington, MI

Steve Dail, who received his bachelor's degree in electrical engineering, was named Teacher of the Year by Farmington Public Schools. Mr. Dail teaches Physics at Harrison High School, provides extracurricular activities in STEM, and developed the RoboHawks robotics club. His classroom style has been likened to episodes of Bill Nye the Science Guy.

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

EE Times Highlights ECE Research at ISSCC

EE Times offered 18 Views of ISSCC through photos of some of the most interesting and cutting-edge products and research shown at the event. They showcased research by Prof. Blaauw, Prof. Sylvester, and graduate student Wootaek Lim. The chip is an ARM Cortex-M0+ running off a 0.09mm2 solar cell that puts out 400 picowatts, thanks to novel circuits designed to suppress power leakage. Electronics360 previewed the work, calling it a stand-out paper. [Electronics360 preview]
Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sylvester, Dennis  

The Lunar New Year Celebration - Bridging Cultures

The EECS atrium got festive on February 19 with a celebration of the Lunar New Year. A large crowd turned out for the show, including many Chinese students. Many said that the recognition of their country's most widely celebrated calendar holiday made them feel more at home. Check out photos and a video from the event. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Jessy Grizzle Delivers Distinguished University Professorship Lecture on Bipedal Robots

Jessy Grizzle delivered a lecture on his work with bipedal robots last week in honor of being named the Elmer G. Gilbert Distinguished University Professor of Engineering. The lecture covered the different iterations of Prof. Grizzle's world-renowned bipedal creations since he started work on Rabbit in 1999. His most recent project, MARLO, is his first bipedal robot to walk freely outdoors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Jason Corso Receives Google Faculty Research Award

Prof. Jason Corso received a 2015 Google Faculty Research Award to further his research in computational learning from instructional video content. His goal is to develop a consistent and reliable method for producing a visual and textual summary of any video that describes a process - from simple sandwich how-to's to more elaborate technical processes. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Computer Vision  Corso, Jason  Lab-Systems  Machine Learning  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Robots In Our Image

If two-legged locomotion is the next frontier for robotics, Prof. Jessy Grizzle and his team are setting the standard for graceful, human-like walking by robots. He talks about his own robot, MARLO, in the context of the upcoming DARPA Robotics Challenge. MARLO is not entered, but is making great strides here at the University of Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Babak Parviz Goes Through the Glass

EE alum Babak Parviz received the Lifetime Achievement Award at the 2015 Golden Mousetrap Awards for his work with Google Glass and Smart Contact Lenses. He is currently VP at Amazon. Read the Design News article, and listen to Babak talk about these devices and more during his last visit to Michigan, when he received the Alumni Merit Award for 2014. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

U-M Engineering Leads a $5M Initiative to Reform STEM Education

In an effort to drive systemic reform of science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, education, Michigan Engineering is co-leading a national program that will give more undergraduates and masters students deep experience in faculty research. A $5 million grant from The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust has established the Vertically Integrated Projects, or VIP, consortium a group of 15 universities. Among them are institutions that primarily serve underrepresented, minority, or nontraditional students, as well as members of the Association of American Universities. [Full Story]

Electrify Tech Camp for High School Students - Register now for one or more of our 3 camps

Electrify Tech Camp consists of three non-residential summer camps (Power Up; Light It Up; and Sense It) for high school students. Camp participants will be introduced to college-level topics at an introductory level suitable for high school students. Each camp will range between 24-30 students. Campers will work together in groups of 3 or 4 at the same state-of-the-art equipment used by Michigan undergraduate students. They will build devices, learn some coding, and test their work, all under the careful supervision of faculty and current Michigan students. It is an amazing opportunity for any high school student who has an interest in modern technology, and a love for science and math. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  

Prof. Emerita Lynn Conway to Advise Open-Access CS Journal

Lynn Conway, Prof. Emerita of EECS, will serve on the advisory board for a new open-access journal by PeerJ, called PeerJ Computer Science. (What is an open-access journal? Watch this comic video) The peer-reviewed web journal previously considered articles in the biological and medial sciences, making this its first expansion into a new field since its founding in 2012. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Conway, Lynn  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  

HKN Students Crowned Mr. and Ms. Engineer at the The Engineering Games

This years Engineering Games, hosted by SWE (Society of Women Engineers), pitted teams from six engineering student organizations in a clash of talent, skill, and problem solving. Representing HKN (Eta Kappa Nu), the international honor society for Electrical and Computer Engineers, ECE graduate student David Hiskens and CS senior Alyssa Kornylo took home the Mr. and Ms. Engineering crowns. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Undergraduate Students  

Researchers Build Groundbreaking Device for NASA SMAP Mission

Prof. Kamal Sarabandi and his team constructed the most powerful radar calibration device in the world to interface with NASAs newest orbiting satellite, called Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP). The goal is to measure the amount of water in moisture, which should ultimately to improve our ability to forecast the weather, monitor droughts, predict floods, enhance crop productivity, and understand the Earths water, energy, and carbon cycles. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Sarabandi, Kamal  Space technology  

Somin Eunice Lee Receives CAREER Award for Research in Nanoscale Biotechnology

Prof. Lee aims to develop configurable nanostructures to deliver genes efficiently and specifically to the cell nucleus, without impacting neighboring cells, using optical transport, or light. This method for efficient and specific delivery of corrected genes should lower required dosages and minimize unwanted side effects. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Genetics  Health  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Lee, Somin E.  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

New Alumni Book: State Space Consistency and Differentiability

Demetrios Serakos published a new book entitled State Space Consistency and Differentiability. Dr. Serakos received his Master's and Ph.D. degrees from Michigan, and currently works at the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Virginia. The book was published by Springer. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Cooking robot may offer artificial culinary intelligence

Prof. Jason Corso was asked to comment on research that involved the use of artificial intelligence to provide robots with the ability to recognize objects and learn actions by watching humans. In this case, the robot was watching a video. He said it is possible to reconstruct the 3D environment (2D space plus time) that is being shown in the video. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Corso, Jason  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Distinguished University Professor lecture involves walking robots

Despite tremendous advances in the field of two-legged robots during the past few decades, bipedal machines are a long way from impersonating, much less improving upon, the human gait. In his inaugural lecture as the Elmer G. Gilbert Distinguished University Professor of Engineering, Jessy Grizzle will discuss the efforts underway in his lab to close this gap. All are welcome at the lecture, Feb. 4 at 4pm in the Rackham Amphitheatre. A reception will follow in the Assembly Hall. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  

Student Team Reaches Qualcomm Finals with their Proposal for a Wearable Haptic Device

Paul Myers, EE Senior, and Amin Sandoughsaz, EE PhD student, were selected as finalists for the 2015 Qualcomm Innovation Fellowship. They will present their project, A Wearable Haptic Device with Integrated Sensing and Actuation for Next Generation Communication Systems, at the Finals on March 23, 2015 in San Diego. The goal of the project is to augment the transmission of audio and video with the sense of touch [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Undergraduate Students  

Four ECE Faculty Selected for 2014-15 College of Engineering Awards

Four ECE faculty are recipients of CoE Awards: Prof. Jay Guo for Research Excellence; Prof. Stephane Lafortune for Service Excellence, Prof. Mingyan Liu for Education Excellence; and Prof. Wei Lu for Innovation Excellence. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  Lafortune, Stephane  Liu, Mingyan  Lu, Wei  

Three Faculty Selected for 2015 EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards

The EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards are presented annually to faculty members for their outstanding accomplishments in teaching, research, and service. The recipients of the 2015 EECS Outstanding Achievement Award are Benjamin Kuipers, Stephen Rand, and David Wentzloff. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kuipers, Benjamin  Rand, Stephen  Wentzloff, David  

Jessy Grizzle to Deliver U-M Distinguished Lecture on Bipedal Robots (Feb 4 at Rackham)

In Science Fiction, robots walk, run, and jump better than you. In reality, can you count on them to walk over rubble and pull you from a burning building? Not so much. Jessy Grizzle will give the lecture, Taking Bipedal Walking Robots from Science Fiction to Science Fact , in honor of being named the Elmer G. Gilbert Distinguished University Professor of Engineering. He will describe how the science of feedback systems is enhancing the ability to achieve highly dynamic locomotion in bipedal machines. The theory used in the talk will be amply illustrated with graphics and videos of his experiments to make the material accessible to a general audience. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  

Students Win Prizes for Circuit Designs in EECS 413

Two teams of students in Monolithic Amplifier Circuits (EECS 413) earned prizes for their final circuit design projects. First place went to Paul Myers, Tianyu Huang, Di Hu, and Rifat Sheikh for their project An Ultra-Low Power Energy Harvester with Integrated MPPT Circuit. Second place went to Seyed Amin Sandoughsaz Zardini, Chester Liu, Kanghwan Kim, and Shengshuo Lu for An Integrated Ultra-Low Power CMOS On-Chip Thermal Sensor. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

Making small things big in the world of organic electronics

The first City University of Hong Kong Distinguished Lecture of 2015 was delivered by Professor Stephen Forrest on the topic of "Making Small Things Big in the World of Organic Electronics." What interests Professor Forrest is that as devices get smaller, the potential to make things bigger was now available. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  

Miss Washtenaw County Finds Creativity in Every Opportunity

From operettas to oil refineries to pageants, Alexandria Strother has done it all. As Miss Washtenaw County and a double major in Electrical Engineering and Vocal Performance, Alexandria works to bridge her many different worlds with a lot of ambition and creative problem solving. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Student Profile  Undergraduate Students  

Stephen Forrest Elected to National Academy of Inventors

Stephen Forrest, Paul G. Goebel Professor of Engineering, has been named Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). Election to NAI Fellow status is a high professional distinction given to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  Technology Transfer  

How drones and insects merged in ways that might surprise you

Michigan is designing the microelectronics that are the eyes, ears, and brains of the tiny insect-like drones being developed under the Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology (MAST) collaborative. The research at Michigan is part of the Center for Objective Microelectronics & Biomemetic Advanced Technology, directed by Prof. Kamal Sarabandi. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  MEMS and Microsystems  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Arborlight: LED-Based Skylights and Sunshine in Real Time

Prof. Pei-cheng Ku is a co-founder of the startup company Arborlight, which promises the benefits of a window or skylight in offices where neither is available. Xconomy reports that their "Lightwell product looks and behaves just like a skylight. It tunes to geography and time, tracking the position of the sun throughout the day, mimicking the varying color, intensity, and directionality of daylight as normally experienced through traditional windows and skylights." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Ku, Pei-Cheng (P.C.)  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Technology Transfer  

Stryd, co-founded by Prof. Robert Dick, about to launch wearable technology for runners

Prof. Robert Dick is co-founder of Stryd, a startup company that is getting ready to launch what they are calling the worlds first wearable power meter for runners. The device promises to help runners improve efficiency, monitor individual progress, and simplify training. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dick, Robert  Embedded Computing and Systems  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Technology Transfer  

The Future of Solar: $1.3M to Advance Organic Photovoltaics

The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Michigan Engineering Professor Stephen Forrests group a $1.35 million Next Generation Photovoltaics grant earlier this fall, aimed at advancing the practical viability of organic photovoltaics, a carbon-based version of solar technology that promises to radically change the way the suns energy is collected. Forrest is the Paul G. Goebel Professor of Engineering in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and Physics and the former U-M Vice President of Research. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  LEDs  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Optics and Photonics  Optoelectronics  Solar Cell Technology  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Sustainability  

HEV Fuel Economy Meets Drivability in Outstanding Control Systems Paper

Research that aims to find a happy medium between fuel economy and drivability in hybrid electric vehicles was recognized with the 2014 IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology (TCST) Outstanding Paper Award. The research was directed by Prof. Jessy Grizzle, and published in TCST as, "An Energy Management Controller to Optimally Trade Off Fuel Economy and Drivability for Hybrid Vehicles." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Automotive industry  Control Systems  Electric Vehicles and HEVs  Energy  Environment  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Sustainability  

Nick Yang: Investing in the Age of Robotics

Nick Yang has always been ahead of his time. As an undergraduate student at Michigan, Yang and several classmates developed a working prototype of a product similar to Microsofts XBOX Kinect 15 years before that product was launched with great success and critical acclaim. While their product failed to find any buyers when pitched to video game manufacturers, the experience gave Yang the bug of entrepreneurship. But he didn't catch it from anyone around him. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Entrepreneurship  Internet of Things  

Avegant, co-founded by ECE alumni, may be the Future of Multimedia Experiences

When Ed Tang, '11, and Allan Evans, MS'07, PhD'09, of Avegant turned to Kickstarter earlier this year to raise money for their company's new prototype of their premium headphones, they were hoping for $250,000. They surpassed their goal in less than four hours and ended up raising $1.5 million in a mere 30 days. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Entrepreneurship  

Hansford Farris (1919 - 2014): In Memoriam

Hansford Farris (Ph.D. EE 58), professor emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering, passed away December 7, 2014 at the age of 95. Prof. Farris served as an active and highly respected member of the College of Engineering for more than 20 years before his retirement in 1982. He had served as Department Chair, Associate Dean of Engineering, and twice as Acting Dean. Prof. Farris, known to his friends and colleagues as Bill, always acted in a manner that reflected his roots as a Kentucky gentleman. Prof. Farris left a lasting impression on many colleagues and friends. We salute his contributions and thank him for all that he contributed to the department and the discipline. [Full Story]

LNF User Symposium - Sharing Ideas and Celebrating Innovation

The 2014 LNF (Lurie Nanofabrication Facility) User Symposium highlighted the cutting-edge research enabled by Michigan's world-class facility. The Symposium included technical talks, a poster session, and the opportunity for discussion and networking. Attendees represented many departments throughout the University, as well as industrial users of the LNF. Stephen Forrest, Paul G. Goebel Professor of Engineering, presented the events keynote address, Making small things big in the world of organic electronics. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  LNF  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Lynn Conway to Receive 2015 IEEE/RSE Wolfson James Clerk Maxwell Award

Lynn Conway, Professor Emerita of EECS, has been selected to receive the 2015 IEEE/RSE Wolfson James Clerk Maxwell Award, for contributions to and leadership in design methodology and pedagogy enabling rapid advances and dissemination of VLSI design tools and systems. This award is one of the highest presented by IEEE. Prof. Conway, sometimes called the hidden hand in the microchip design revolution, was a major source of innovation in a field that eventually made personal computers and smartphones possible. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Conway, Lynn  Diversity and Outreach  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Women in Computing  

Amr Ibrahim Receives Rackham Int. Student Fellowship to Develop Sub-MMW Radar System

Amr Ibrahim, graduate student in Electrical Engineering, received a Rackham International Student Fellowship to support his research in the area of sub-millimeterwave (Sub-MMW) radar systems. The main driving force to develop these systems originates from security applications and, in particular, stand-off imaging of persons and hidden objects, including illicit drugs and explosives [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Graduate Students  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Prof. Michael Flynn Elected IEEE Fellow for Contributions to Analog-Digital Interfaces

Prof. Michael Flynn has been elected IEEE Fellow for contributions to analog-digital interfaces. He has achieved important breakthroughs in the performance and energy efficiency of analog-digital interfaces. His research has significantly impacted three primary areas: 1) analog to digital conversion; 2) the analog-digital interface in wired and wireless communication systems; and 3) applications to complete systems, particularly brain-machine interfaces. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Flynn, Michael  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  

All ECE News for 2015