ECE News for 2018

Inaugural ECE Willie Hobbs Moore Alumni Lecture: Dr. Isaac R. Porche III

Dr. Porche (PhD EE:S 1998) was the inaugural speaker for the ECE Willie Hobbs Moore Alumni Lecture. A senior engineer at the RAND Corporation, Porche talks on "Information-Age Conflict" as an expert in cybersecurity. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Cybersecurity  

Mythic snags $40 million to advance AI chips

Mythic, founded by EECS aIumnus David Fick (CTO) and Mike Henry (CEO), raised $40M in investment to produce custom chips created to power AI applications. The company had its start in the Michigan Integrated Circuits Lab (MICL), where Fick was advised by, and Henry worked with as a postdoctoral researcher, Profs. David Blaauw and Dennis Sylvester. Among the first employees are alumni Laura Fick and Skylar Skrzyniarz, both also MICL students advised by Blaauw and Sylvester. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Blaauw, David  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sylvester, Dennis  

Fall 2018: Quantum Nanotechnology

Course No.: EECS 498-003
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Duncan Steel
Prerequisites: MATH 215, MATH 216, PHYSICS 240 and co-req of EECS 230 or equivalent

Course Description:
The development and application of nano-technology is impacting nearly all the fields of engineering, from those who are developing it to those who use it. Future engineers working to design new devices will need a skill set that is considerably broadened to include the behavior of materials and devices when they becomesufficiently small. Devices like transistors and quantum well lasers have already forced engineers to understand the impact of Fermi-Dirac statistics and energy quantization on devices. However, the emergent field of nano-technology is revealing that the concepts we have from our current scale devices are no longer adequate to predict correct device experience. Moreover, in this new regime, new physical properties are emerging that may revolutionize how we think about information, its storage, transmission and processing. This course introduces students to basic concepts that are relevant to novel device concepts. The course will explore the new properties of nano-vibrators, quantum LC circuits, the role of loss, the impact of the quantum vacuum on nano-switches, coherent superposition, quantum entanglement, light (one photon at a time) and quantum information and computing. You will learn a new way to think about how things work.
[More Info]

Fall 2018: Reinforcement Learning (RL)

Course No.: EECS 498-006 and EECS 598-006
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Satinder Baveja
Prerequisites: See instructor

Course Description:
This course will be a fast-paced programming-based introduction to both the fundamentals of Reinforcement Learning (RL) as well as some of the recent advanced and exciting ideas at the intersection of Deep Learning and RL (or DeepRL)
[More Info]

Fall 2018: Power Semiconductor Devices

Course No.: EECS 598-002
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Becky Peterson
Prerequisites: EECS 320 or equivalent

Course Description:
Power devices are at the heart of all modern electronics, from the power grid and renewable energy to hybrid/electric vehicles, trains, space exploration, and industrial and consumer electronics. This course will cover design and operating principles of semiconductor devices for discrete and integrated power electronics. We will discuss the power MOSFET, IGBT, HEMT, thyristors, Schottky and PIN diodes, as well as emerging devicearchitectures. We will study the semiconductor materials, device fabrication and packaging required for power devices, including Si, GaN, SiC, and Ga2O3. Students will learn numerical device modeling using commercial software (Synopsys Sentaurus and Silvaco Atlas), and will do a final group presentation on a topicof their choice.
[More Info]

Fall 2018: Data Mining

Course No.: EECS 498-001
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Danai Koutra
Prerequisites: EECS 281 or graduate standing in CSE

Course Description:
Unprecedented amounts of data are being generated daily everywhere -- on the web, social networks, mobile apps, supermarket transactions, movie and music services, traffic sensors, smart home devices, healthcare, and more. Methods for extracting nuggets of information from mountains of data are transforming the world: data-driven approaches are changing thescientific and decision-making processes and solving various societal problems. This course covers the fundamental concepts in data mining, focuses on methods and algorithms and, at thesame time, aims to equip the students with practical skills for mining of large-scale, real data. The topics that will be covered include big data systems, frequent itemsets, similarity and clusteranalysis, mining of networks / time series / data streams, and applications, such as recommendation systems, social network analysis and web search.
[More Info]

Fall 2018: Green Photonics

Course No.: EECS 598-004
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Zetian Mi
Prerequisites: EECS 429 or equivalent

Course Description:
Energy, water, and environmental sustainability are among the most critical challenges we face in the next decades. Green Photonics is concerned with the application of semiconductor optoelectronics including light sources, detectors, and photovoltaic devices to these problems. The most familiar photonic technologies in this field are solar cells and LED lighting, which have had an enormous and growing impact over the past few decades. The course will cover the fundamentals of semiconductor photonic materials and devices, as well as new frontiers in green photonics, including integrated nanophotonic circuits and solar fuels. Important topics to be discussed include: solar cells, solar-to-hydrogen conversion, energy efficient nanophotonic devices including LEDs, lasers, and micro/nanoscale devices, as well as integrated nanophotonics.
[More Info]

Fall 2018: Computational Data Science

Course No.: EECS 598-003
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Raj Nadakuditi
Prerequisites: Programming experience in MATLAB, C, C++, Python or R

Course Description:
See attached flyer
[More Info]

Fall 2018: Computer Hardware Design for Machine Learning

Course No.: EECS 598-005
Credit Hours: 3 (or 4 with an optional project)
Instructor: Zhengya Zhang
Prerequisites: EECS 427 or EECS 470

Course Description:
Machine learning has evolved rapidly in the last decade and it has become ubiquitous in applications from smart devices to self-driving cars. A key enabler of modern machine learning is the availability of low-cost, high-performance computer hardware, such as graphics processing units (GPUs) and specialized accelerators such as Googles tensor processing unit (TPU). New machine learning applications constantly impose new requirements and constraints on the hardware design. Hardware implementations must fit increasingly stringent area and power envelope. This course will survey the latest architecture and circuit designs for machine learning applications. Paper reviews and presentation will be the essential parts of this course. An optional unit can be earned by benchmarking or prototyping selected designs that leads to insightful conclusions.
[More Info]

Fall 2018: Introduction to Algorithmic Robotics

Course No.: EECS 498-005
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Dmitry Berenson
Prerequisites: EECS 280 is required, EECS 281 and MATH 214 are recommended

Course Description:
Build the foundation for your future in robotics:

-Convex Optimization-Motion Planning-Grasping-Point Cloud Processing-Probabilistic Reasoning-Kalman and Particle Filters
[More Info]

Charles and Patricia Krumm Endow the George I. Haddad Graduate Fellowship Fund

Alumni Charles and Patricia Krumm have established the George I. Haddad Graduate Fellowship Fund to support graduate students in Electrical and Computer Engineering. The endowment fund honors Charles Krumms former doctoral advisor and mentor, Prof. George Haddad, and his contributions to the field of electrical and computer engineering. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Haddad, George I.  

Free electrical engineering textbooks for students

A new textbook initiative spearheaded by faculty at University of Michigan, UC-Berkeley, and The University of Utah aims to ease the financial burden of college students in engineering courses by offering newly-published books for free online. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Ulaby, Fawwaz  Undergraduate Students  

Marlin P. Ristenbatt: In Memoriam

Marlin P. Ristenbatt, research scientist emeritus in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, passed away March 2, 2018, at the age of 89. Since retiring in 1998, following a long and productive career as a teacher and researcher, he has remained closely affiliated with the Department. The Department salutes Marlin Ristenbatt and thanks him for all that he contributed to the department and the discipline. [Full Story]

Duncan Steel Co-Editor-in-Chief of Encyclopedia of Modern Optics, 2nd edition

Duncan Steel, Robert J. Hiller Professor of Engineering, is Co-Editor-in-Chief of the second edition of the Encyclopedia of Modern Optics, published by Elsevier. Topics covered include classical and quantum optics, lasers, optical fibers and optical fiber systems, optical materials and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Optics and Photonics  Steel, Duncan  

Ali Mostajeran earns IEEE-SSCS Predoctoral Achievement Award

Ali Mostajeran, visiting scholar from Cornell University, received a 2018 IEEE-SSCS Predoctoral Achievement Award award. Mostajeran works with Prof. Ehsan Afshari researching novel millimeter-wave and terahertz electronics for imaging, biomedical hydration sensing, and communication applications. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Afshari, Ehsan  

Louise Willingale Receives NSF CAREER Award to Advance Scientific Knowledge of Plasmas

Louise Willingale has received an NSF CAREER Award for her research project Relativistic Electron Driven Magnetic Reconnection." Magnetic reconnection occurs during high-energy-density phenomena such as solar flares and auroras, and is also relevant to the process of nuclear fusion. Willingale plans to conduct high-energy-density laboratory experiments at the University of Michigan T-cubed laser facility and with the HERCULES laser, both housed in the Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, to shed light onto the little understood process of magnetic reconnection and test the accuracy of existing theories. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Optics and Photonics  Plasma Science and Engineering   Willingale, Louise  

Necmiye Ozay Receives ONR Young Investigator Award to Advance Research in Autonomous System

Necmiye Ozay received a 2018 Young Investigator Award from the Office of Naval Research (ONR) for her research project "Correct-by-construction Control with Non-asymptotic Learning, Estimation and Detection in-the-Loop." Her research will incorporate the latest advances in learning and estimation by developing new theory and algorithms that seamlessly blend adaptability, safety and correctness. The award comes from the Science of Autonomy Program, which emphasizes a multi-disciplinary approach to the development of future autonomous systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Ozay, Necmiye  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Kim Michelle Lewis Appointed Associate Dean at Howard University

Previously at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Kim Michelle Lewis, Ph.D., has been appointed as associate dean for Research and Graduate Programs and full professor in the Department of Physics at Howard University. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Heath Hofmann discusses transistors in troubled Toyota Prius

Prof. Heath Hofmann lends his expertise to the LA Times to describe current troubles with Toyota Prius software and hardware. Specifically, a fix made to the Prius is being blamed for reduced fuel efficiency. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Automotive industry  Electric Vehicles and HEVs  Hofmann, Heath  

Prof. Wei Lu and What's Next In Neuromorphic Computing

Prof. Wei Lu and his team's work presented at IEDM 2016 was referenced in Semiconductor Engineering detailing how the commercialization of neuromorphic computing will require improved devices and architectures. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lu, Wei  Machine Learning  

Alfred Hero Illustrates Common Threads of Complex Networks in Distinguished University Professor Lecture

Alfred Hero explained how we can infer the intricate, hidden properties of a network in his Distinguished University Professor lecture, Locating the Nodes: From Sensor Arrays to Genomic Networks," held in the Rackham Amphitheatre. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Data and Computing  Hero, Alfred  

Shai Revzen Receives Inaugural Robotics Institute Teaching Award for his Hands-on Approach to Robotics Education

Prof. Shai Revzen was presented with the inaugural Robotics Institute Teaching Award for blazing a new pedagogical path in the teaching of robotics. Since coming to Michigan in 2012, Revzen established an active learning class at the senior undergraduate level, Hands on Robotics; added key components to the graduate course, Robotics Systems Lab; and created a new graduate course, "Comparative Biomechanics Seminar." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Education  Revzen, Shai  

Battling Drone Ships with Anthony Uytingco

Anthony Uytingco, a junior in Electrical Engineering, leads UM::Autonomy, Michigans RoboBoat team for the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems Internationals (AUVSI) RoboBoat Competition. Challenges for the boats include speeding around buoys, navigating a field of obstacles, staying in a precise formation, and docking based on an underwater pinger. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Student Profile  Student Teams and Organizations  

Prof. Hofmann adds expertise on defect that can cause Prius to overheat

Prof. Heath Hofmann helps inform LA Times readers on 2016 Toyota recall to fix a key electronic component on its Priuses. One of California's largest dealers said the cars were still coming in after overheating, however. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Automotive industry  Electric Vehicles and HEVs  Hofmann, Heath  

Herbert Winful receives Outreach and Diversity Award from the College of Engineering

Herbert Winful, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, received the Raymond J. and Monica E. Schultz Outreach and Diversity Award from the College of Engineering. This award honors his efforts in organizing diversity, equity, and inclusion programs, offering mentorship, and championing improvements in local and global communities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Winful, Herbert  

Necmiye Ozay receives 1938E Award from College of Engineering

Necmiye Ozay, assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, received the 1938E Award from the College of Engineering, which recognizes "an outstanding teacher in both elementary and advanced courses, an understanding counselor of students who seek guidance in their choice of a career, a contributor to the educational growth of his/her College, and a teacher whose scholarly integrity pervades his/her service and the profession of Engineering." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Ozay, Necmiye  

Raj Nadakuditi receives Excellence in Teaching Award from College of Engineering

Raj Nadakuditi, associate professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, received the Jon R. and Beverly S. Holt Award for Excellence in Teaching from the College of Engineering. This award honors faculty "with a demonstrated sustained excellence in curricular development, instruction, and guidance at both the undergraduate and graduate levels." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Nadakuditi, Rajesh Rao  

Stephane Lafortune receives Research Excellence Award from College of Engineering

Stephane Lafortune, professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, received the David E. Liddle Research Excellence Award from the College of Engineering honoring his contributions to system and control theory, and especially discrete event systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lafortune, Stephane  

Mark J. Kushner receives Stephen S. Attwood Award from College of Engineering

Professor Mark J. Kushner received the Stephen S. Attwood Award, the most prestigious award that the College of Engineering bestows, in recognition of his extraordinary achievement in teaching, research, service, and other activities that have brought distinction to the College and University. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kushner, Mark J.  

Alfred Hero Receives CoE Professional Leadership and Service Award

Alfred O. Hero, John H. Holland Distinguished University Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and R. Jamison and Betty Williams Professor of Engineering, received the 2018 H. Scott Fogler Award for Professional Leadership and Service from the College of Engineering. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hero, Alfred  

ECE Team behind COMBAT Receives Ted Kennedy Family Faculty Team Excellence Award

Eight core researchers who contributed to the Center for Objective Microelectronics and Biomimetic Advanced Technology (COMBAT) received the 2018 Ted Kennedy Family Faculty Team Excellence Award from the College of Engineering. These members include Dr. Jack East, Prof. Stephen Forrest, Dr. Leland Pierce (Deputy Director of COMBAT), Prof. Amir Mortazawi, Prof. Khalil Najafi, Prof. Kamal Sarabandi (Director of COMBAT), Prof. Dennis Sylvester, and Prof. Euisik Yoon. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  Mortazawi, Amir  Najafi, Khalil  Pierce, Leland E.  Sarabandi, Kamal  Sylvester, Dennis  Yoon, Euisik  

Professor Leung Tsang Receives 2018 Van de Hulst Award

Prof. Leung Tsang has been selected to receive the 2018 Van de Hulst Light-Scattering Award in recognition of his lifetime achievements in the area of electromagnetics. Prof. Tsang is a world-renowned expert in the field of theoretical and computational electromagnetics, and in particular microwave remote sensing of the earth. His research has laid the foundation for the analysis of radar and radiometer remote sensing data and for the development of airborne and spaceborne systems aimed at monitoring the environment, including monitoring climate change, improving hydrological predictions, and managing water and agricultural resources. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Tsang, Leung  

2018 EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards

The EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards are presented annually to faculty members for their outstanding accomplishments in teaching, research, and service. The recipients of the 2018 EECS Outstanding Achievement Award are Peter Chen, Jason Corso, Jason Flinn, and PC Ku. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chen, Peter M.  Corso, Jason  Flinn, Jason  Ku, Pei-Cheng (P.C.)  

Off-Roading in Sand and Snow with Shivani Shah

Shivani Shah (BSE 2017, MSE 2018) is a key member of the Michigan Baja Racing team. Shahs expertise in electrical engineering allowed her to lead the development of an electronically controlled variable transmission (eCVT), a project she launched in EECS 473. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Automotive industry  Control Systems  Student Profile  Student Teams and Organizations  

Quantum Computers Threaten Data Encryption

Prof. Duncan Steel adds to the discussion around quantum computing's potential threat to our current encryption methods. Prof. Steel uses optics to study, control, and manipulate the quantum properties of semiconductor structures. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Quantum Science and Technology  Steel, Duncan  

Prof. Amir Mortazawi Introduces Robust Wireless Power Transfer

In this video, Prof. Mortazawi introduces his work in improving wireless charging. Compared to conventional methods of wireless power, which require a specific distance and alignment, Prof. Mortazawi's version operates over a range of distances and orientations without a drop in power. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Mortazawi, Amir  Power and Energy  Wireless Systems  

PhD Candidate Michael Benson Wins Another Year Leading Honor Society HKN

Michael Benson, a PhD candidate in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, was reelected student governor for Eta Kappa Nu (HKN), the electrical and computer engineering honor society and the honor society of the IEEE. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Student Profile  Student Teams and Organizations  

Semiconductor Breakthrough May Be Game-changer for Organic Solar Cells

In an advance that could push cheap, ubiquitous solar power closer to reality, Prof. Stephen Forrest and his team have found a way to coax electrons to travel much further than was previously thought possible in the materials often used for organic solar cells and other organic semiconductors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Sustainability and Environment  

Professor Emeritus Ribbens Publishes 8th Edition of Understanding Automotive Electronics

William Ribbens, professor emeritus of electrical engineering and computer science, recently published an 8th edition of his textbook Understanding Automotive Electronics, which adds information on the latest in automotive technology, including autonomous vehicles, camera systems, hybrid control, and software networks [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Automotive industry  Autonomous Vehicles  Electric Vehicles and HEVs