EECS News

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Sep 30, 2014
Jason Mars Selected as Program Chair for CGO 2015

Prof. Jason Mars has been selected to serve as Program Chair for the 2015 International Symposium on Code Generation and Optimization (CGO). CGO brings together researchers and practitioners working at the interface of hardware and software on a wide range of optimization and code generation techniques and related issues. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Mars, Jason  

Sep 29, 2014
Long-Lived Blue OLED Could Lead to Better Displays

Many displays in smartphones and televisions generate red and green light with phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes but use more energy-hungry fluorescent devices for blue. That's because blue PHOLEDs only last for a couple of days. Now Prof. Stephen Forrest and his group have found a way to extend the lifetime of blue PHOLEDs by a factor of 10, bringing them much closer to commercial use. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Displays  Forrest, Stephen  LEDs  Solid-state Devices and Nanotechnology  

Sep 29, 2014
These Energy-Saving, Batteryless Chips Could Soon Power The Internet Of Things

The story focuses on how the new Michigan/UVa start-up company, PsiKick, is going to help enable the Internet of Things thanks to their very low power processing, called subthreshold processing. Also mentioned is the Michigan startup, Ambiq Micro, which has also entered the low power revolution. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Internet of Things  Technology Transfer  Wentzloff, David  

Sep 26, 2014
Blue LED breakthrough for efficient electronics

In a step that could lead to longer battery life in smartphones and lower power consumption for large-screen televisions, Prof. Stephen Forrest and his team have extended the lifetime of blue organic light emitting diodes by a factor of 10. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Electronic devices  Forrest, Stephen  LEDs  Solid-state Devices and Nanotechnology  

Sep 25, 2014
Khalil Najafi to Receive 2015 IEEE Daniel E. Noble Award for Emerging Technologies

Khalil Najafi, Schlumberger Professor of Engineering and ECE Chair, was selected to receive the 2015 IEEE Daniel E. Noble Award for Emerging Technologies, "For leadership in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), technologies, and devices and for seminal contributions to inertial devices and hermetic wafer-level packaging." The IEEE Daniel E. Noble award is one of IEEE's Technical Field Awards, which are among the highest awards given by IEEE. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Najafi, Khalil  

Sep 24, 2014
Prof. Pallab Bhattacharya To Receive 2015 IEEE David Sarnoff Award

Pallab Bhattacharya, Charles M. Vest Distinguished University Professor and James R. Mellor Professor of Engineering, was selected to receive the 2015 IEEE David Sarnoff Award, "For contributions to near-infrared and visible quantum dot lasers." The IEEE David Sarnoff award is one of IEEE's Technical Field Awards, which are among the highest awards given by IEEE. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  

Sep 23, 2014
Ryan Wolcott Receives Best Student Paper Award at IROS 2014

Ryan Wolcott received a Best Student Paper Award at the 2014 IEEE/RSJ International Conferences on Intelligent Robot Systems. His paper focuses on one of the most significant roadblocks to autonomous vehicles, which is the prohibitive cost of sensor suites necessary for localization. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles   Graduate Students  

Sep 17, 2014
Prabal Dutta Named to Popular Science Brilliant Ten List

Professor Prabal Dutta has been named one of Popular Science's 2014 Brilliant Ten for his work in developing energy scavenging sensors that could help herald the Internet of Things. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Dutta, Prabal  Internet of Things  Sensors  

Sep 17, 2014
Student Spotlight: Tal Nagourney - Exploring navigation

ECE graduate student Tal Najourney is exploring new frontiers in navigation technology. He and others in the group are trying to build a navigation device that doesnt need any external frame of reference, meaning the gyroscope is meant to guide navigation devices without using GPS. He worked with a professional glass blower to hone his technique. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  GPS  Graduate Students  MEMS and Microsystems  Najafi, Khalil  

Sep 11, 2014
Fighting lung cancer with faster image processing

A new $1.9 million research program led by Prof. Jeff Fessler seeks to make low-dose computed tomography scans a viable screening technique by speeding up the image reconstruction from half an hour or more to just five minutes.The advance could be particularly important for fighting lung cancers, as symptoms often appear too late for effective treatment. Prof. Thomas Wenisch is collaborating on the project. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Medical Imaging  Medical diagnosis  Signal and Image Processing   Wenisch, Thomas  

Sep 11, 2014
David Chesney Receives IBM Faculty Award

Dr. David Chesney has been awarded a 2014 IBM Faculty Award for his work in teaching software engineering and for his success in encouraging students to leverage new approaches to developing assistive technologies for people with disabilities. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Chesney, David  Engineering for the Greater Good  

Sep 11, 2014
Jia Deng Wins Best Paper Award at ECCV

Prof. Jia Deng and his collaborators have won the Best Paper Award at ECCV for "Large-Scale Object Classification using Label Relation Graphs." It addresses a computer's ability to accurately classify objects in images, which is a fundamental challenge in computer vision research and an important building block for tasks such as localization, detection, and scene parsing. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Deng, Jia  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Sep 10, 2014
Theres Really No Delete Button on the Internet

In this interview on Michigan Radio, Prof. Kevin Fu talks about Internet privacy and the fact that boundaries don't really exist in the age of cloud computing. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Privacy  

Sep 10, 2014
Research finds No Large Scale Heartbleed Exploit Attempts Before Vulnerability Disclosure

Did the NSA or anyone else take advantage of the Heartbleed bug prior to its public disclosure? This Threat Post story describes research by Prof. J. Alex Halderman and others which indicates that traffic data collected on several large networks shows no exploit attempts in the months leading up to the public disclosure. The article has also been slashdotted here. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Privacy  Security (Computing)  

Sep 08, 2014
Kevin Compton Receives ACM-ICPC Coach Award

Prof. Kevin Compton has received an ACM-ICPC Coach Award for his work in five times bringing student programming teams from the University of Michigan to the world finals in the annual ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Compton, Kevin  Programming  

Sep 08, 2014
Scenes from MHacks IV

They came in droves and built beautiful things. See scenes from MHacks IV, which took place Sept 5-7 in the Beyster, EECS, and Dow Buildings, in this photo album by College of Engineering photographer Joseph Xu. [Full Story]

Sep 08, 2014
Facets of Privacy Discussed at Inauguration Panel

At a symposium to mark the inauguration of President Mark S. Schlissel, leading privacy scholars from U-M and Carnegie Mellon University, including Prof. Kevin Fu, discussed the issues surrounding privacy, social media, and cloud computing. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Privacy  

Sep 08, 2014
Jetpac: The Implications of the Google Acquisition

In this posting on Dell's Tech Page One site, Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja comments on how the totality of social media posts can, when analyzed on a massive scale, reveal deeply sensitive personal information. Google's recent acquisition of Jetpac wil allow the search engine company to expand its AI capabilities in directions that would potentially allow it to create such user profiles. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Big Data  Machine Learning  

Sep 04, 2014
Prof. Ted Norris Receives Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award

Prof. Norris was recognized for his consistently outstanding achievements in scholarly research, sustained high quality teaching and mentoring of students and junior colleagues, and for his distinguished service to the University and professional community. He will receive the award at a special ceremony October 6, 2014. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Norris, Theodore B.  

Sep 04, 2014
Prof. Stephen Forrest a Most Influential Scientist

Prof. Stephen Forrest was included in a recent Thompson Reuters publication as one of the most influential scientific minds in the world for 2014. The basis for inclusion was the number of times his publications were cited by his peers in the literature between 2002-2012. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  

Sep 04, 2014
Cheng Zhang Receives Optical Sciences Scholarship

ECE graduate student Cheng Zhang received the 2014 Michael Pate Optical Sciences Memorial Scholarship. Cheng works with Professor L. Jay Guo on research projects in the field of micro/nano-scale optical device physics and fabrication. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Sep 02, 2014
1,000 Hackers Expected on North Campus for MHacks IV

On the evening of Friday, September 5, about 1,000 student hackers from across the country will arrive for MHacks IV, the premier student-run hackathon. 36 hours of imagination and coding is expected to result in dozens of working projects by Sunday morning. [Full Story]

Aug 27, 2014
Kyu-Tae Lee Wins Best Poster Award for Colorful Solar Cells

ECE graduate student Kyu-Tae Lee received a Best Poster Award at the 40th Annual Michigan AVS Symposium. His poster described the creation of solar cell device structures that enable attractive multi-colored solar cells that can be used on windows and other interior and exterior surfaces. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Guo, L. Jay  Solar Cell Technology  Solid-state Devices and Nanotechnology  

Aug 27, 2014
Small Satellite Wins Big

ECE graduate student Iverson Bell took home a check for $7,500 for his second place prize in the 28th Annual AIAA/USU Conference on Small Satellites. Bell built an electrodynamic tether for space applications. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Diversity and Outreach  Gilchrist, Brian E.  Graduate Students  Space technology  

Aug 26, 2014
Fall 2014: Foundations of Computer Vision

Course No.: EECS 598-008
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Jason Corso
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Course Description:
Computer Vision seeks to extract useful information from images. This course begins the fundamentals of image formation and then organizes the remaining material according to the class of information to be extracted. The course has been designed to present an introduction to computer vision targeted to graduate students. The course will balance theory and application both in lectures and assignments. [More Info]

Aug 26, 2014
Fall 2014: Practical Machine Learning

Course No.: EECS 598-007
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Jenna Wiens
Prerequisites: EECS 445 or EECS 545 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
In this seminar class we will cover the basics of practical machine learning and data mining while focusing on real-world applications. We will read and critique recent applied ML work in the fields of sports analytics, data-driven medicine, finance, and personalized education. At the same time, we will review a complementary set of papers to help guide our discussion in terms of the pragmatic aspects of ML e.g., feature engineering, cross-validation, and performance measures. The overall goal of the class is for students to gain a deeper understanding of the practical challenges and pitfalls associated with applying machine learning tools and techniques in a real-world setting.

Aug 26, 2014
Fall 2014: Probabilistic Analysis of Large Scale Systems

Course No.: EECS 598-006
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Vijay Subramanian
Prerequisites: EECS 501 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
This course will focus on emerging topics in epidemics and diffusions, queueing systems, analysis of randomized algorithms, Bayesian information cascades, network analysis and random graphs. [More Info]

Aug 26, 2014
Fall 2014: Laser Plasma Diagnostics

Course No.: EECS 598-005
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Louise Willingale
Prerequisites: EECS 537 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
This course will cover the techniques used for creating, characterizing and timing high power laser pulses from megajoule-nanosecond pulses to relativistic-intensity femtosecond pulses. [More Info]

Aug 26, 2014
Tweet Analysis Paints More Accurate Employment Picture Than The US Government Release

As reported in International business Times, U-M researchers including Prof. Michael Cafarella and graduate student Dolan Antenucci have found a quicker and more accurate measure of unemployment in America -- through analysis of Twitter data. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Big Data  Cafarella, Michael  

Aug 25, 2014
Shared Memory in Mobile Operating Systems Provides Ingress Point for Hackers

Computer science researchers have exposed a shared memory weakness believed to exist in Android, Windows, and iOS operating systems that could be used to obtain personal information from unsuspecting users. The research team has demonstrated how passwords, photos, and other personal information can be stolen while users use popular mainstream apps. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Security (Computing)  

Aug 22, 2014
Researchers Expose Security Flaws in Backscatter X-ray Scanners

A team of security researchers including Prof. J. Alex Halderman and graduate student Eric Wustrow have discovered several security vulnerabilities in the full-body backscatter X-ray scanners that were deployed to U.S. airports between 2009 and 2013. The researchers were able to slip knives, guns, and other contraband past the systems. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Aug 21, 2014
Sensors in the Soil (video)

Soil moisture information is just as important to NASA engineers as it is to local farmers. For example, this data is used to monitor climate patterns and predict landslides. Prof. Mingyan Liu is working on a system that will make collecting and analyzing this data more accurate. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Communications  Environment  Liu, Mingyan  Sensors  

Aug 21, 2014
Researchers Demo Hack to Seize Control of Municipal Traffic Signal Systems

Computer science researchers working with Prof. J. Alex Halderman have demonstrated that a number of security flaws exist in commonly-deployed networked traffic signal systems that leave the systems vulnerable to attack or manipulation. They presented their findings at the 8th USENIX Workshop on Offensive Technologies. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Aug 21, 2014
MABEL at the Chicago Field Museum

MABEL, the record-breaking bipedal robot who was taught to walk and run by Prof. Jessy Grizzle and his team, has arrived at the Chicago Field Museum, where she will part of the biomechanics exhibit through January 2015. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Aug 21, 2014
Solving the Big Data Dilemma

Prof. Laura Balzano talks about how to get the best results from big collections of data. Science, healthcare, economics, infrastructure and government could be completely changed by effectively using big data. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Balzano, Laura  Big Data  Environment  Health  Information Technology  Signal and Image Processing   

Aug 19, 2014
Researchers Hack Into Michigans Traffic Lights

MIT Technology Review has covered work led by Prof. J. Alex Halderman, in which he and students including Branden Ghena have demonstrated security flaws in a common system of networked traffic signals. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Aug 19, 2014
Four New Faculty Join ECE in Fall 2014

ECE is delighted to welcome three outstanding new faculty members to Michigan. These faculty broaden and deepen ECE's areas of expertise in computer vision, communications and information theory, environmental and remote sensing, and laser-plasma interactions. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Communications  Computer Vision  Corso, Jason  Information Technology  Lasers  Optics and Photonics  Plasma Science and Engineering   Subramanian, Vijay  Willingale, Louise  

Aug 19, 2014
Two New Faculty Join CSE in Fall 2014

CSE is delighted to welcome two outstanding new faculty members to Michigan. With highly relevant research pursuits in the realms of secure and private Internet-scale services and in machine-learning and data extraction methodologies, they'll help to lead and teach us as we enter a world increasingly shaped by computer science and engineering. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Big Data  Machine Learning  Madhyastha, Harsha  Security (Computing)  Wiens, Jenna  

Aug 15, 2014
Slashdot: Can Our Computers Continue To Get Smaller and More Powerful?

Prof. Igor Markov's article in this week's issue of the journal Nature, along with the ARS Technica article that provides commentary, have been slashdptted. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Markov, Igor  

Aug 15, 2014
Are processors pushing up against the limits of physics?

ARS Technica has provided a lengthy analysis and commentary on Prof. Igor Markov's article that appeared in the journal Nature regarding the limits of computing. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Markov, Igor  

Aug 14, 2014
The Limits of Moores Law Limits

Following an interview with Prof. Igor Markov, EE Times asks: ...now that we are approaching the atomic scale, many see the handwriting on the wall: When you get down to one atom per memory cell, Moore's Law has to end -- or has it? [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Markov, Igor  

Aug 13, 2014
Can Our Computers Continue to Get Smaller and More Powerful?

In an article in this week's issue of the journal Nature, Prof. Igor Markov reviews limiting factors in the development of computing systems to help determine what is achievable, identifying "loose" limits and viable opportunities for advancements through the use of emerging technologies. His research for this project was funded by the National Science Foundation, the Semiconductor Research Corporation, and the Air Force Research Laboratory. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Markov, Igor  

Aug 11, 2014
Vulnerabilities Demonstrated in Traffic Signal Controls

Students in Prof. J. Alex Halderman's recent EECS 588 course, including graduate student Brandon Ghena, have demonstrated vulnerabilities that would allow hackers to take control of municipal traffic light systems. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Aug 08, 2014
Court case: Voting via the Internet is a civil rights issue for disabled

The debate over whether Americans should be permitted to vote via the Internet has long pitted voting system manufacturers, who frame it to election officials as inevitable and modern, against cybersecurity experts including Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who has repeatedly demonstrated vulnerabilities in voting systems worldwide. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Aug 07, 2014
New graphene sensor technology for personal and environmental health

A new wearable vapor sensor could one day offer continuous disease monitoring for patients with diabetes, high blood pressure, anemia or lung disease. The new sensor, which can detect airborne chemicals either exhaled or released through the skin, would likely be the first wearable to pick up a broad array of chemical, rather than physical, attributes. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Environment  Medical diagnosis  Sensors  Solid-state Devices and Nanotechnology  Wearable electronics  Zhong, Zhaohui  

Aug 07, 2014
Student Spotlight: Patrick Sheridan - Memristors and the Brain

Patrick is at the frontier of developing memristor devices for neuromorphic computing as a member of Prof. Wei Lus nanoelectronics research group. Taking inspiration from the brain, we look at how neurons are interconnected and share signals, and then we try to replicate that with our memristive devices, said Patrick, Ph.D. candidate in electrical engineering. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lu, Wei  

Aug 06, 2014
Low-Power Laser Could Speed CPUs

Prof. Bhattacharya's breakthrough room-temperature polariton laser enables commercialization of the technology. One potential application discussed by the author is to enable on-chip optical interconnects. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  Electronic devices  Solid-state Devices and Nanotechnology  

Aug 06, 2014
Optoelectronics: A practical polariton laser

In this article, the author describes the importance of Prof. Bhattacharya's room-temperature, eletrically injected polariton laser, stating that it, "represents an important step towards the practical implementation of polaritonic light sources. In many ways, the first report of a semiconductor laser device based on BoseEinstein condensation that is pumped electrically at room temperature opens a new era in optoelectronics. It may not be long before polaritonic devices start to claim their share of the optoelectronics market, just as double heterostructure devices did 40 years ago." [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  Optoelectronics  Solid-state Devices and Nanotechnology  

Aug 05, 2014
Alumni Spotlight: Peter Tchoryk - An Entrepreneurial CEO

Peter Tchoryk (MSE EE 1994) is CEO of Michigan Aerospace Corporation (MAC), and co-founder of Springmatter and OptoAtmospherics. Peter wants to invest in entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial activities dedicated to improving the world. His work at MAC and especially his activities in Springmatter help him do that. [Full Story]

Aug 05, 2014
Utah is correct to both be at the front of online voting, and cautiously study security

Prof. J. Alex Halderman is watching as the state of Utah convenes a committee to study how the Beehive State might proceed with online voting. [Full Story]


Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  
All EECS News for 2014

 



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