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EECS in the News

A Case Against Net Neutrality

In this opinion piece, Prof. Harsha Madhyastha makes that point that an entirely neutral net is not necessarily an efficient net. In order for us to operate optimally, he says we need to answer the question: How can we legally define the permissible ways an ISP could throttle or prioritize traffic in a manner that does not place undue burden on ISPs, yet is verifiable by third parties? [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Madhyastha, Harsha  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  

Rethinking Transistors for the Internet of Things

The technological achievements of PsiKick, cofounded by Prof. David Wentzloff, and Ambiq Micro, cofounded by Scott Hanson (BSE MSE PhD EE), are compared to other low-voltage transistors in the competition to offer the lowest power consumption for our ubiquitous electronics. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Wentzloff, David  

Do Robots Deserve Human Rights?

In this article, Discover reached out to experts in artificial intelligence, computer science and human rights to shed light on whether or not robots should be given human rights. Prof. Kuipers talks about why robots do not deserve the same rights as humans. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kuipers, Benjamin  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

This Researcher Is Using Brain-Mapping to Improve Anxiety and Depression Treatment for Teens

Anastasia Yendiki (PhD EE:S 2005) talks about her work mapping brain matter to help better treat anxiety and depression in teens in this profile series by InStyle magazine highlighting women "who not only have a voice but defy the irrelevant preconceptions of gender."
[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Diversity and Outreach  

Blockchain Supply Chain's Chronicled Names ECE alumnus Gutgutia as VP

As reported by BlockTribune, blockchain-based smart supply chain solutions company called Chronicled has named Abhishek Gutgutia (MS EE 2007) as one of its new Vice Presidents of Product. Gutgutia will work with Chronicled to expand its business in the pharmaceutical and precious metals industries. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

The Two-Legged Robots Walking Into the Future

Prof. Jessy Grizzle and his students are featured in this VICE Motherboard video on bipedal robots and specifically Cassie's family. Learn about Cassie's roots at Agility Robotics, see what Cassie sees, and where bipedal robots might go in the future. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

An armed robber's Supreme Court case could affect all Americans digital privacy for decades to come

Prof. HV Jagadish writes in this article for The Conversation about the data privacy challenges presented by a world in which our devices continuously record and track our activities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Jagadish, HV  Lab-Software Systems  Mobile and Networked Computing  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Marvell Is Buying Rival Chipmaker Cavium, Founded by ECE Alum Syed Ali, For $6 Billion

Marvell Technology is purchasing Cavium, a provider of semiconductor products founded by Syed Ali (MSE EE 1981), for $6 billion in cash and stock. Ali will serve as a strategic adviser and board member of the combined companies. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Data and Computing  

University students reflect on attending COP23 Conference

Matt Irish, who is studying for masters degrees in Applied Climate Science and Electrical Engineering, attended this years 2017 United Nations Climate Change Conference. Irish is an EDF Climate Corps Fellow & Dow Sustainability Fellow. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Sustainability  

Beyond the threshold: Solving the leaking problem in ultra-low-power systems

Prof. David Blaauw and his team is recognized for their potential solution in providing a stable voltage to overcome a large hurdle in the design of small electronics. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Electronic devices  

An afternoon with U-M Robotics' newest robot

WDIV visited Jessy Grizzle's team and Cassie, their bipedal robot, and put her in the spotlight with a live feed to Facebook. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Cassie Blue Makes Her Debut

Prof. Jessie Grizzle invited the Associated Press to record the new bipedal robot's first steps around North Campus. Watch the video. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Securing the vote: How 'paper' can protect US elections from foreign invaders

This story on security problems with voting quotes Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who says that "Although there is no evidence that any past election in the United States has been changed by hacking, it is in my opinion only a matter of time until one is." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

FDA Spells Out When Medical Device Modifications Need Review

Bill Aerts, Deputy Director at the Archimedes Center in CSE, is quoted in the article about new FDA guidance for manufacturers of medical devices regarding software patches for security purposes. Also quoted is Ben Ransford, co-founder and CEO of cybersecurity firm Virta Laboratories, a CSE spinout. [Full Story]

The newest AlphaGo mastered the game with no human input

In this article, Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja is quoted from his commentary on the Nature article regarding DeepMind's use of unassisted reinforcement learning in the AlphaGo Zero system. He points out that AI programs like AlphaGo Zero, which can gain mastery of tasks without human input, may be able to solve problems where human expertise falls short. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

DeepMind has a bigger plan for its newest Go-playing AI

In this article, Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja comments on DeepMind's findings published in Nature regarding AlphaGo Zero. Prof. Baveja reinforces the notion that with reinforcement learning, AI systems do not necessarily need human expertise. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

DeepMinds Go-playing AI doesnt need human help to beat us anymore

In this article, Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja comments on DeepMind's findings published in Nature regarding AlphaGo Zero. "Over the past five, six years, reinforcement learning has emerged from academia to have much more broader impact in the wider world, and DeepMind can take some of the credit for that," says Prof. Baveja. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

DeepMind's latest AI breakthrough is its most significant yet

In this article, reinforcement learning expert Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja comments on DeepMind's findings published in Nature regarding AlphaGo Zero's breakthrough performance and indicates that it could be one of the biggest AI advances so far. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Why the Krack Wi-Fi Mess Will Take Decades to Clean Up

This article quotes Prof. Kevin Fu, who says "For the general sphere of IoT devices, like security cameras, we're not just underwater. We're under quicksand under water." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

VAuth tech feels your voice in your skin

This article describes VAuth, the new thechnology that supplements voice authorization developed in the lab of Prof. Kang G. Shin. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  Shin, Kang G.  

Hacking North Korea is Easy. Its Nukes? Not So Much

This article reports on how difficult it is for hackers to invade North Korea's nuclear program. CSE research fellow Will Scott talks about the country's limited connections, and says that any successful attack would require a human agent working to manually sabotage target systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Scribe: Deep Integration of Human and Machine Intelligence to Caption Speech in Real Time

Research by Prof. Walter Lasecki and his collaborators is highlighted in the Sept. issue of Communications of the ACM. The researchers describe Scribe, a system that combines human labor and machine intelligence to caption speech in real time. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Assistive Technology  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Interactive Systems  Language and Text Processing  Lasecki, Walter  

The Internet of Things: From Hype to Reality

Get some insights into the future of the Internet of Things including the so-called Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) in this article featuring commentary by Prof. David Blaauw. Read The Internet of Things: From Hype to Reality, by Edwin Cartlidge, Optics & Photonics News, September 2017 - Online or download the PDF. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Internet of Things  

Phone Browsing Could Become Faster, May Use Less Data With Smart Code

This article reports on Vroom, software developed by computer scientists including Prof. Harsha Madhyastha and CSE graduate student Vaspol Ruamviboonsuk. Vroom improves mobile browsing speed by optimizing the end-to-end interaction between smart devices and web servers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Madhyastha, Harsha  Mobile and Networked Computing  

After Y Combinator, May Mobility Ready to Test Self-Driving Fleets

May Mobility, founded by Prof. Edwin Olson, is focused on real-world implementations of autonomous driving technology, with a specific emphasis on whats possible today, not what might be doable five or ten years from now. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

May Mobility is a self-driving startup with a decade of experience

May Mobility, founded by Prof. Edwin Olson, is focused on real-world implementations of autonomous driving technology, with a specific emphasis on whats possible today, not what might be doable five or ten years from now. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

In fight for free speech, researchers test anti-censorship tool built into the internet's core

This article describes an implementation of TapDance, a method of anticensorship deployment that is built into the very core of the internet itself. By building TapDance into the servers and routers that underpin the Internet, censorship would become impractical. TapDance's development has been led by Prof. J. Alex Halderman. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

A New Kind of Classroom: No Grades, No Failing, No Hurry

This article on reports on the recent popularity of mastery-based learning in K-12 schools. Thurnau Professor Elliot Soloway is quoted in the article. He questions the approach, and contends that students learn by building on knowledge and frequently returning to it, not by working to mastery and then moving on. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Interactive Systems  Soloway, Elliot  Technology for Education  

Youd Never Have to Plug in This Battery-Free Cell Phone

Prof. David Blaauw offers feedback on this concept for a batteryless cellphone. Overall what they are doing is very interesting and they are pursuing a goal that everyone would love and kill for." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  

U.S. elections are an easier target for Russian hackers than once thought

This article on voting system security quotes Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who says of the prospect of election tampering that "the technical ability is there and we wouldn't be able to catch it. The state of technical defense is very primitive in our election system now." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Where the Jobs Are: 2017

Hot fields in the United States include embedded engineering, control engineering, and robotics. ECE's the place to be! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Embedded Computing and Systems  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Heres exactly how Russia can hack the 2018 elections

Vulnerabilities in our voting system need to be addressed swiftly, according to experts in the field, including Prof. J. Alex Halderman. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Let's Encrypt Issues 100 Millionth Security Certificate

The Internet is more secure thanks to Let's Encrypt, the certificate authority founded by Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his collaborators. Since launching in Jan. 2016, Let's Encrypt has issued 100 million certificates. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

How to prevent Russian hackers from attacking the 2018 election

In this commentary piece in the Chicago Tribune, Prof. J. Alex Halderman and Justin Talbot-Zorn make the case for a straightforward policy agenda to secure America's voting systems against the threat of hackers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

If Voting Machines Were Hacked, Would Anyone Know?

In the article, Prof. J. Alex Halderman points out how electronic voting systems even those not connected to the Internet can be compromised. One path for hackers is to attack the computers that are used to program the ballots, which are later transferred to voting machines via memory cards. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

New Computer Chips That See Data Will Enable Energy-Efficient Supercomputers

Drawing inspiration from how mammalian brains process sight, Prof. Wei Lu has found a way to mimic the functions of biological neural networks on a next-gen memristor chip. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Lu, Wei  Memristor  

Neuromorphic Chips Offer Neural Networks That Actually Work Like the Brain

Engineers at the University of Michigan are onto something rather more brainlike, however, with help from a peculiar electrical component known as a memristor. They've developed a new "sparse coding" algorithm that uses grids of memristors to approximate the pattern recognition abilities of mammalian brains. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Lu, Wei  Memristor  

U.S. Hospitals Not Immune to Crippling Cyber Attacks

In this article, Prof. Kevin Fu comments on the vulnerabilities that exist in hospital and healthcare systems and devices. The recent strike by the ransomware program called WannaCry demonstrates that these shortcomings. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Health  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  

Apple Just Acquired This Little-Known Artificial Intelligence Startup

CSE Prof. Michael Cafarella is a co-founder of the startup Lattice Data, which builds on statistical inference and machine learning to solve problems using dark data. Apple has acquired Lattice, which recently emerged from stealth mode, for $200M. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cafarella, Michael  Data and Computing  Lab-Software Systems  

Apple acquires AI company Lattice Data, a specialist in unstructured dark data, for $200M

CSE Prof. Michael Cafarella is a co-founder of the startup Lattice Data, which builds on statistical inference and machine learning to solve problems using dark data. Apple has acquired Lattice, which recently emerged from stealth mode, for $200M. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cafarella, Michael  Data and Computing  Lab-Software Systems  

Smartphone security hole: "Open port" backdoors are common

The College of Engineering reports on work by computer science security researchers which has revealed that so-called "open ports" are much more vulnerable to security breaches than previously thought. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile and Networked Computing  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Picting, not Writing, is the Literacy of Todays Youth

This blog post by Thurnau Prof. Elliot Soloway and his collaborator Cathie Norris looks at the disconnect between existing instructional materials (90% text) and how K-12 students communicate and consume (90% image-based), with ramifications for educational practices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Interactive Systems  Soloway, Elliot  Technology for Education  

Wellman and Rajan on the Ethics of Automated Trading

In this audio interview at Algocracy and the Transhumanist Project, Prof. Michael Wellman and Business Administration Prof. Uday Rajan comment on the ethics of autonomous trading agents on financial markets. The discussion encompasses algorithmic trading, high frequency trading, market manipulation, the AI control problem, and more. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

Hundreds of popular Android apps have open ports, making them prime targets for hacking

This article reports on the work done by CSE researchers Yunhan Jack Jia, Qi Alfred Chen, Yikai Lin, Chao Kong, and Prof. Z. Morley Mao in characterizing a widespread vulnerability in popular Android apps. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile and Networked Computing  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Rackham Student Spotlight: Elizabeth Dreyer

Liz is a Rackham Merit Fellow and has always been intentional about her status as a first generation college student, wanting to find whatever ways to increase her chance for success as much as possible. Liz examines magneto-electric scattering, shining high-powered lasers and controlling input light to focus on the scattered light and determine whats happening to the material, particularly exploring what makes one material better than another. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Rand, Stephen  

Open Ports Create Backdoors in Millions of Smartphones

This article reports on work by CSE researchers who have characterized a widespread vulnerability in the software that runs on mobile devices which could allow attackers to steal contact information, security credentials, photos, and other sensitive data by using open ports to create backdoors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile and Networked Computing  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Hacking with Sound Waves

CSE researchers have demonstrated a new way of using sound to interfere with devices containing accelerometers, such as smartphones and self-driving cars. This presents a new avenue for hackers to use in compromising devices to steal information or disrupt communication. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Embedded Computing and Systems  Fu, Kevin  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

An Obscure Flaw Creates Backdoors in Millions of Smartphones

CSE researchers have characterized a widespread vulnerability in the software that runs on mobile devices which could allow attackers to steal contact information, security credentials, photos, and other sensitive data, and also to install malware and to perform malicious code execution which could be used in large-scale attacks. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile and Networked Computing  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Why India Needs A Paper Trail For Free And Fair Elections

This article in the Indian edition of the Huffington Post, references the work that Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his collaborators did in 2010 to demonstrate vulnerabilities in India's "tamper-proof" electronic voting machines. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Need a job? How about engineering a driverless car?

As Michigan accelerates toward leadership in the emerging driverless car technology, industry experts say its workforce needs to catch up. Gov. Rick Snyder signed legislation in December allowing the public to buy and use fully self-driving cars when they are available. Jessy Grizzle, the director of Michigan Robotics, said the problem of finding talent in self-driving cars lies in the lack of integrated capability to develop the industry. But that is also where the solution lies. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Grizzle, Jessy  

University researchers develop ultra-thin silver film to improve touch-screen technology

Prof. Jay Guo's research team succeeded in creating a tarnish-proof silver film whose properties allow for various uses such as high-tech screens. The teams paper, published last Monday, details the films versatility. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Electronic devices  Flexible electronics  Guo, L. Jay  Lab-Optics and Photonics  

Michigan Allots $87 Million to Replace Flints Tainted Water Pipes

Prof. Jacob Abernethy collaborated with Flint officials and colleagues at UM Flint on a study last year that analyzed the Flint water system and the undertaking required to identify and replace lead pipes in homes. He said that the state's just-announced plan for finishing the replacement of thousands of targeted lead pipes in three years seemed possible with enough money and resources. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

The next cyberattack could render your anti-virus and encryption software useless

Researchers including Prof. Kevin Fu and CSE graduate student Timothy Trippel have demonstrated a new way of using sound to interfere with devices containing accelerometers, such as smartphones. This presents a new avenue for hackers to use in compromising devices to steal information or disrupt communication. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Speck-Size Computers: Now With Deep Learning

The author describes the Michigan Micro Mote and research by David Blaauw and Dennis Sylvester presented at the 2017 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference. They presented 10 papers in all related to the micromote computers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  

Screens of the future could be made with transparent silver

Prof. Jay Guo just published new research in the journal Advanced Materials that suggests using a seven-nanometer-thick film made of silver could replace indium tin oxide as a transparent conductive surface for touch screens. Indium is growing more expensive as its use increases, so this could be a valuable alternative. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Flexible electronics  Guo, L. Jay  Lab-Optics and Photonics  

University presidents: Prepare for global economy

President Mark Schlissel writes with two other Michigan university presidents on the need to prepare graduates to compete in the global market. The article mentions ECE professor Kamal Sarabandi, a world leader in radar sensing whose work is used by NASA and other government agencies. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Smartphone Accelerometers Can Be Fooled by Sound Waves

This article features work done by Prof. Kevin Fu and his collaborators in which they demonstrate a way to take control of or influence devices such as smartphones through the use of sound waves. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Embedded Computing and Systems  Fu, Kevin  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Optical Magnetism: Photons induce high levels of magnetism in optical materials

Prof. Steve Rand's group at the MURI Center for Dynamic Magneto-Optics (DYNAMO) have both observed and explained the presence of photon-induced magnetic dipole (MD) scattering (optical magnetism) in certain crystalline materials that is just as intense as ordinary Rayleigh scattering. The experiments show for the first time an alternative way of controlling magnetic properties of materials with light. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Metamaterials  Optics and Photonics  Rand, Stephen  

AI Scientists Gather to Plot Doomsday Scenarios (and Solutions)

Michael Wellman, Lynn A. Conway Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, was part of a workshop aimed at worst-possible adverse outcome AI scenarios and how to prevent them. One of the topics discussed was Prof. Wellman's stock market manipulation scenario. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

Will artificial intelligence ever actually match up to the human brain?

This article asks the question: How long will it be until we have a general artificial intelligence, rathe than silos of narrow, specific AIs? John Laird, the John L. Tishman Professor of Engineering, comments in the article on the challenges involved in identifying capabilities and integrating them together into a general AI. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Laird, John  

Professor Who Urged an Election Recount Thinks Trump Won, but Voting Integrity Still Concerns Him

This article in the Chronicle of Higher Education includes a Q and A with Prof. J. Alex Halderman on the 2016 presidential election recount and on the challenges ahead for election integrity. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Clinc Raises Venture Capital Round of $6.3 million

Clinc, the artificial-intelligence startup founded by CSE Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang, announced Wednesday morning that it has raised a funding round of $6.3 million. The company's open-source intelligent assistant and machine learning research platform is involved in research programs with Intel Corp., IBM Corp. and the National Science Foundation. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Why Some Apps Use Fake Progress Bars

School of Information Professor Eytan Adar is quoted in this article about a technique he calls "benevolent deception" which can increase user's trust in a system. Later in the article, he lays out guidelines for using benevolent deception. Prof. Adar also has an appointment in CSE. [Full Story]

VIDEO: U-M to begin experimenting with bird-inspired robot

The University of Michigan will begin experimenting with the capabilities of a robot inspired by a flightless bird. With two legs, backward facing knee-like joints and a short torso, researchers note that it may remind people a bit of an ostrich. Named CASSIE, the robot comes from Agility Robotics, a startup spun out of Oregon State University. U-M is one of the first organizations to begin testing out CASSIE. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Memristor Research Highlights Neuromorphic Device Future

Professor Wei Lu is leading an effort to make neuromorphic processor technology a reality. Lus group is focusing on the memristors a two-terminal device that essentially is a resistor with memory that retain its stored data even when turned off that can act like synapses to build computers that can act like the human brain and drive machine learning. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Brain  Lu, Wei  Memristor  

Inside the Recount

This story provides an in-depth, inside view of how the recount effort for the 2016 presidential election - of which Prof. J. Alex Halderman was a primary participant - was sparked, how it came to focus on three states, what the results showed, and what we can learn from it all. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Our Voting System Is Hackable by Foreign Powers

This article reviews the vulnerabilities that currently exist in our voting system. It references Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who has stated that he and his students could have changed the results of the November election. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

How Powerful AI Technology Can Lead to Unforeseen Disasters

This article reports on a panel discussion on AI ethics and education hosted by the Future of Life Institute. Panelist Prof. Benjamin Kuipers notes that the small decisions that robots make on their own can cause trouble because human programmers may fail to take all of a robot's possible choices into account. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Kuipers, Benjamin  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Innovation is for Finishers

Many researchers are hoping startups will help get their ideas to the marketplace and universities are trying to help. Prof. Stephen Forrest, himself the founder of multiple companies, has helped colleagues get their own projects off the ground through his support for the Michigan Venture Center. Former CSE chair Farnam Jahanian also shares experiences with his founding of Arbor Networks. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Entrepreneurship  Forrest, Stephen  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Optics and Photonics  

The 2016 US Election Wasnt Hacked, but the 2020 Election Could Be

Prof. Alex Halderman is quoted in this article which reports on the recent Chaos Communication Congress. "Developing an attack for one of these machines is not terribly difficult," says Prof. Halderman. "I and others have done it again and again in the laboratory. All you need to do is buy one government surplus on eBay to test it out." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Poker Is the Latest Game to Fold Against Artificial Intelligence

Prof. Michael Wellman is quoted in this article on new AI systems that are able to best top-level human opponents in games of poker. "What's really new for such a complex game is being able to effectively compute the action to take in each situation as it is encountered, rather than having to work through a simplified form of the entire tree of game possibilities offline," says Prof. Wellman. Prof. Wellman is also quoted on the same subject in this article in Wired. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

Prof. Kevin Fu to deliver endowed Dr. Dwight Harken Memorial Lecture on medical device security

Prof. Kevin Fu has been selected to give the annual Dwight E. Harken Lecture during the AAMI 2017 Conference & Expo in Austin, TX, June 912. Prof. Fu directs the Archimedes Center for Medical Device Security and the Security and Privacy Research Group at Michigan and is also CEO and chief scientist of Virta Labs, Inc. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Five things that got broken at the oldest hacking event in the world

Chaos Communications Congress is the world's oldest hacker conference, and Europe's largest. Every year, thousands of hackers gather in Hamburg to share stories, trade tips and discuss the political, social and cultural ramifications of technology. This story quotes Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who with his student Matt Bernhard, has studied the security of the past US presidential election. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

U-M researchers create helpful tool for Flint residents during ongoing water crisis

This video and text news item describes MyWater-Flint, the app and website designed by UM researchers to help Flint residents with data about the ongoing water crisis. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  

Trump Allowed to Join Fight Against Pennsylvania Recount

A battle over whether or not a recount of ballots cast in Pennsylvania during the recent presidential campaign is taking place. In the case made for a recount, hackers could have easily infected Pennsylvanias voting machines with malware designed to lay dormant for weeks, pop up on Election Day and then erase itself without a trace, according to Prof. J. Alex Halderman. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Vote Recount Push Advances, but Reversing Trumps Win Is Unlikely

This article in the New York Times reports on the uneven progress toward recounts in three key states for the recent presidential election. Led by Green Party candidate Jill Stein, the recounts were inspired by a call from leading security experts, including Prof. J. Alex Halderman. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Want to Know if the Election was Hacked? Look at the Ballots

In this post, Prof. J. Alex Halderman sets the record straight regarding what he and other leading election security experts have actually been saying to the Clinton campaign and everyone else whos willing to listen. He describes a situation where malware could be a factor in the vote totals during the presidential election. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Trump election: Activists call for recount in battleground states

The BBC reports on the call by leading computer scientists, including Prof. J. Alex Halderman, for a recount of votes in the presidential election in three swing states. Their analysis shows that Clinton performed worse in counties that relied on electronic voting machines compared to paper ballots and optical scanners. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Computer scientists urge Clinton campaign to challenge election results

CNN reports that a group of top computer scientists, including Prof. J. Alex Halderman, have urged Hillary Clinton's campaign to call for a recount of vote totals in Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania. The computer scientists believe they have found evidence that vote totals in the three states could have been manipulated or hacked and presented their findings to top Clinton aides on a call last Thursday. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Experts Urge Clinton Campaign to Challenge Election Results in 3 Swing States

Leading computer security experts with an interest in election integrity, including Prof. J. Alex Halerman, have called for a recount of the votes cast in the presidential election in three key swing states. They believe they have found evidence that results in Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania may have been manipulated. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Vulnerable connected devices a matter of "homeland security"

This article describes the security ramifications of unprotected IoT devices such as internet-connected cameras, video recorders on the larger Internet. It quotes Prof. Kevin Fu on the effort that would be required to secure this new ecosystem. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

After Dyn cyberattack, lawmakers seek best path forward

In a hearing hosted by the House Energy and Commerce Committee, University of Michigan professor Kevin Fu, Level 3 Communications Chief Security Officer Dale Drew and computer security luminary Bruce Schneier briefed Congress on the challenges posed by insecure internet-connected devices and whether they believe the government can make a difference. This article provides a summary of the proceedings. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

How You Speak To Siri & Alexa Matters More Than You Think Here's Why

Prof. Rada Mihalcea is quoted in this story about sexism and today's virtual assistants such as Amazon's Alexa, Apple's Siri and Microsoft's Cortana. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  Women in Computing  

Regulate cybersecurity or expect a disaster, experts warn Congress

The U.S. government must demand that all internet-connected devices have built-in security, according to experts including Prof. Kevin Fu who warned Congress that the country could soon face a disastrous, lethal cyberattack. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Provost and former CSE Assoc. Chair Martha Pollack named president at Cornell University

Former Associate Chair of CSE and Dean of the School of Information Martha Pollack has been named President of Cornell University. Our congratulations! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Pollack, Martha  

The Network Standard Used in Cars Is Wide Open to Attack

As automobiles grow increasingly computerized, the security of the network for in-vehicle communication is a growing security concern. New research by Prof. Kang G. Shin and graduate student Kyong-Tak Cho demonstrates that the controller area network (CAN) protocol implemented by in-vehicle networks has a new and potentially quite dangerous vulnerability. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  Shin, Kang G.  

How Safe is Your Smart Home?

The Smart Home sounds like a great idea. But is it an unsafe home? "I would be cautious, overall," says Prof. Atul Prakash. "The technology is relatively new. Hardware is probably a little bit ahead of the software at this point, and a lot of vulnerabilities we are seeing are primarily on the software side of things." Read more and listen to the full interview here. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Prakash, Atul  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

A Lot Of Voting Machines Are Broken Across America (But It's Totally Normal)

Forbes reports on numerous reports of broken machines causing epic queues and peeving voters. Matt Bernhard, CSE graduate student and an expert on the security of electoral systems, says that "This year isn't that different, other than I'm expecting higher turnout which may stress the infrastructure more." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

US election: Experts keep watch over 'hack states'

"Unless the election is extraordinarily close, it is unlikely that an attack will result in the wrong candidate getting elected," suggest CSE graduate student Matt Bernhard and Prof. J. Alex Halderman. But they say the risk the election process could be disrupted by hackers should be taken extremely seriously. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Next Weeks Anticipated U.S. Election

This article discusses the vulnerabilities of direct recording electronic voting systems. It quotes Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his colleagues on the security of DREs. Twenty-nine states still use DREs and five states: Delaware, Georgia, Louisiana, New Jersey and South Carolina, use the easily compromised machines without a paper trail. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

US Election Systems Seen 'Painfully Vulnerable' to Cyberattack

This article sheds light on potential cyberattacks during the U.S election. Some cybersecurity analysts warned that hackers of even moderate talent could possibly throw the results of the 2016 presidential election into chaos. Prof. Halderman hopes all the attention on voting-system vulnerabilities will motivate state governments to invest in cybersecurity for the 2020 elections. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Forget rigged polls: Internet voting is the real election threat

Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his contemporaries have been tireless in warning us of the security risks associated with internet voting. Will we listen? [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

The Security Challenges of Online Voting Have Not Gone Away

This guest post on IEEE Spectrum by CSE graduate student Matthew Bernhard, Prof. J. Alex Halderman, and Robert Cunningham, Chair of the IEEE Cybersecurity Initiative, lays out the details for the case against Internet voting. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Hacking Your Health (video)

What security weaknesses exist in hospitals and health care providers? Prof. Kevin Fu, Director of the University of Michigans Archimedes Center for Medical Device Security, comments on medical device security on CNBC News. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Health  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  

How the 2016 Election Could Be Hacked (story+video)

Is our voting system really vulnerable to hackers? Professor of computer science, J. Alex Halderman, explains the situation to VICE News in this segment that originally aired on October 24. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

$800K in Research Awards Aim to Address Data Science

Four research teams from the University of Michigan and Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China are sharing $800,000 in awards to use data science techniques to address big challenges. Prof. Atul Prakash is co-PI for a project that aims to develop algorithms and mechanism design to incentivize users to charge electric vehicles at appropriate times and locations, leading to better load management, a more reliable grid, and cost savings. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Electric Vehicles and HEVs  Lab-Software Systems  Prakash, Atul  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Video Friday: Robot Patrol, Tickling Machine, and More From IROS 2016

This IEEE Spectrum collection of research project videos from the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS) includes a piece on robot navigation in dynamic social environments from Prof. Edwin Olson's APRIL Lab. To see the Michigan video, scroll to the bottom of the page. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Matthew Bernhard on the Steve Gruber Show (audio)

Matthew Bernhard, a CSE graduate student working with Prof. J. Alex Halderman, speaks on the Steve Gruber Show about the possibility for voting fraud in Michigan during the upcoming election. He is introduced just over one minute into the show. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

How to (Really) Steal an Election (audio)

Prof. J. Alex Halderman is interviewed on the dangers posed by electronic voting in this story. The story covers all types of concerns regarding elections, from Donald Trump's warning of a rigged election through the Bush v. Gore contest and the use of electronic voting systems. Halderman appears at about 20:15. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

U-M to build $75-million robotics hub

Robotic technologies for air, sea, and roads, and for factories, hospitals, and homes will have tailored lab space in the University of Michigan's planned Robotics Laboratory. Prof. Jessy Grizzle has been named director of robotics at U-M, and is leading the new facility's planning and development. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Teslas big bet: $8,000 worth of self-driving hardware in all new cars before the software is ready

In this article, Prof. Edwin Olson is quoted discussing the reliability of autonomous vehicles. Tesla recently announced that all new cars will be equipped with the hardware needed for full self-driving capability. Olson believes theres still a long way to go until self-driving cars become widespread. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

This Is Why We Still Cant Vote Online

This article highlights the work done by security researchers to demonstrate the dangers inherent in the use of paperless electronic voting systems. It spotlights work done by Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his students in 2010, when they accepted a challenge to hack Washington DC's proposed new Internet system. The research team was able to hack the system, steal records, and modify it to play the Michigan fight song -- all in less than two days. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Rigging the Election

Jason Smith, writer and director of the documentary "I Voted?", references work done by Prof. J. Alex Halderman in demonstrating the vulnerabilities of electronic voting systems in this opinion piece. Mr. Smith's mission has been to reinforce the message that "Nothing is more important to the future of our democracy than ensuring the integrity of all elections." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Experts: State Should Audit Election Results

Since hackers have targeted the election systems of more than 20 states, cyber-security experts including Prof. J. Alex Halderman say Michigan should change its policy and routinely audit a sample of its paper ballots to protect against election fraud. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

As cyberthreats multiply, hackers now target medical devices

This article, which quotes Prof. Kevin Fu, describes the threat of malware for implantable medical devices and for hospital systems. Because these systems were typically designed without security in mind, "There is no [impervious] device," says Prof. Fu. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

What Surveillance Will Look Like in the Future: Even Bugs Will Be Bugged

Prof. David Blaauw gets a mention in the Atlantic for building the world's smallest computers, which can be equipped with cameras and other sensors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sensors  

Looking for a Choice of Voices in A.I. Technology

This article in the New York Times examines conversational computing in connection with gender and race. Prof. Jason Mars is featured in the article and he highlights the challenges associated with choosing voices for AI technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mars, Jason  

Asked and Answered Jessy Grizzle Takes on Reddit

Prof. Jessy Grizzle, newly named Director of Michigan Robotics, took to Reddit to answer the internet's burning questions about bipedal robots. The first in the department to tackle the medium, he spent a day fielding open questions from the public as part of an Ask Me Anything on the science subreddit. Questions ranged from deep algorithm inquiries to complaints about tough EECS courses. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Cybersecurity and Voting Machine Security (video)

Prof. J. Alex Halderman appeared on C-SPAN to discuss vulnerabilities associated with electronic voting and to answer viewer questions. It's worth viewing this 40-minute video segment of the C-SPAN airing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Technology Will Destroy Democracy Unless This Man Stops It

This article provides an in-depth profile of Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his research in the area of security, in particular his work in exposing the security vulnerabilities of electronic voting systems and his additional work in the area of internet anticensorship. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Why Can't We Vote Online?

This article on the security concerns associated with Internet voting points to the 2010 hack of the District of Columbia's internet voting system by researchers led by Prof. J. Alex Halderman as a prime example of what could go wrong. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Flint might have a bigger problem with lead pipes than previously thought

Prof. Jacob Abernethy and his research collaborators have concluded that Flint city records are highly inaccurate and that more public service water lines than expected that contain lead. Prof. Abernethy, together with his students and other researchers, is using multiple data sources to develop predictive software that will identify locations in Flint that are most at risk for lead contamination. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Far more Flint homes have lead lines than expected, report shows

A new report issued by U-M researchers, including Prof. Jacob Abernethy, concludes that Flint city records are highly inaccurate and that more public service water lines than expected contain lead. Prof. Abernethy, together with his students and other researchers, is using multiple data sources to develop predictive software that will identify locations in Flint that are most at risk for lead contamination. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Medical Devices Should Withstand Rigor, Expert Says

When it comes to managing medical device security risk, hospital administrators should focus on weathering the storm and not necessarily prevention, Prof. Kevin Fu, a noted medical device security expert, encouraged this week. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  

A Brief Chronology of Medical Device Security

This article in the Communications of the ACM, co-written by Prof. Peter Honeyman, reviews the current era of cyber threat to medical device security. The article concludes with a look forward at steps necessary to secure medical devices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Honeyman, Peter  Lab-Software Systems  Medical Device Security  

Progress in AI, through collaborative research

Guru Banavar, Chief Science Officer and VP for Cognitive Computing at IBM Research, has blogged about IBM's university partnerships to advance cognitive computing, including work at CSE led by Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja to develop the next generation of conversational interface technologies. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Despite Flaws, Paperless Voting Machines Remain Widespread in the U.S.

This article surveys problems associated with aging and insecure electronic voting systems. It quotes Prof. J. Alex Halderman, a leading researcher in this area, as saying, "Clearly we still have a long way to go to ensure that all Americans have access to a form of voting technology they can trust." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Prof. Emerita Lynn Conway to Receive Honorary Degree from University of Victoria

Prof. Emerita Lynn Conway will receive an honorary degree from the University of Victoria - the university's highest academic honor - during fall the convocation ceremony on Nov. 9 in the University Centre Farquhar Auditorium. Prof. Conway will be recognized for her pioneering work in VLSI and as a leading activist for transgender rights. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Conway, Lynn  

A hot new app is hoping to change the way you manage your money

This article reports on Clinc, the intelligent personal assistant startup headed by Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang. At the Finovate conference, Clinc introduced Finie, the planet's most intelligent personal financial assistant that helps everyone talk to their bank accounts in a natural and conversational way to get real-time and instant financial insights. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  Technology Transfer  

U-M, Yottabyte partner to accelerate data-intensive research

A strategic partnership between the University of Michigan and software company Yottabyte promises to unleash a new wave of data-intensive research by providing a flexible computing cloud for complex computational analyses of sensitive and restricted data. Prof. Eric Michielssen says it will “improve research productivity by reducing the cost and time required to create the individualized, secure computing platforms that are increasingly necessary to support scientific discovery in the age of Big Data.” [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Michielssen, Eric  

Paperless voting could fuel 'rigged' election claims

This article describes the concern that talk of a potentially "rigged" election could undermine confidence in results. Amongst the issues associated with electronic voting is that many systems do not produce paper backups that could be used for verification, according to Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who is quoted in the article. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

An experimental policing tool is gaining traction across the country and there are major civil-liberties concerns

This article on the use of data for predictive policing points to the possibility that those practices could lead to racial profiling and aggressive policing. It quotes HV Jagadish, Bernard A. Galler Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, on the subject. He suggests that police departments haven't struck the right balance between more efficiently targeting crime and avoiding civil-liberties conflicts. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Jagadish, HV  Lab-Software Systems  

Expert Questions Claim That St. Jude Pacemaker Was Hacked

This article reports on the work done by Prof. Kevin Fu and his collaborators, which has called into question the allegations of security flaws in St. Jude Medical's pacemakers and other life-saving medical devices. The claim of security holes was made by short-selling investment research firm Muddy Waters Capital LLC and medical device security firm MedSec Ltd [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Software Systems  Security (national and personal safety)  

Guarding Presidential Election Vote Integrity Presents a Daunting Task

Prof. J. Alex Halderman is quoted in this article regarding election integrity. He points out that any election system must be able to prove that results are accurate in order to dispel concerns about vote rigging. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

New Concerns About Hacks Into State Voting Systems

Prof. J. Alex Halderman was a guest on the Diane Rehm show on August 31, where the conversation included discussion of the security of elections. Click the "Listen" button under the headline to hear the interview; the discussion with Prof. Halderman begins at 20:30. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Hacking Report on St. Jude Pacemakers Was Flawed, Researchers Say

This article details how a report on cybersecurity vulnerabilities in St. Jude Medicals implantable heart devices released last week by short sellers was flawed and didnt prove the flaws existed, according to a review by University of Michigan researchers including Prof. Kevin Fu. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

University study finds flaws in criticism of St. Jude cyber security

This article reports on the work done by Prof. Kevin Fu and his collaborators, which has called into question the allegations of security flaws in St. Jude Medical's pacemakers and other life-saving medical devices. The claim of security holes was released last week by short-selling investment research firm Muddy Waters Capital LLC and medical device security firm MedSec Ltd. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Real holograms are on bank cards, not starships

Holograms are more than science fiction, but the real-life technology isnt what people think it is. Most of the technologies calling themselves holographic do not produce actual holograms including the specters of Vargas Llosa, Kimmel, Modi, Tupac, and MJ, which are created via computer-generated images and high-definition video projection. A real hologram is an image that records the diffraction of laser light directed at an object, and was invented in part by EECS professor Emmett Leith in the 1960s. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Holography  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lasers  

Meet DDoSCoin, the Cryptocurrency that Pays When You P0wn

This article in the Register reports on the research conducted by CSE alum Eric Wustrow and CSE student Benjamin VanderSloot. They created a proof-of-work project built on cryptocurrency that offers a means to prove participation in distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. DDoSCoin allows miners to prove that they have contributed to a distributed denial of service attack against specific target servers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  

New Cryptocurrency DDoSCoin Incentivizes Users for Participating in DDoS Attacks

The article reports on the new research paper by CSE alum Eric Wustrow and CSE student Benjamin VanderSloot. The researchers have put forward the concept of DDoSCoin a cryptocurrency with a malicious proof-of-work. Presented at the Usenix 2016 security conference, the researchers explain the DDoSCoin system which enables miners to select the victim servers by consensus using a proof-of-stake protocol. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  

Online voting could be really convenient. But its still probably a terrible idea.

This article reports on Internet voting availability in the US. It then examines Estonia's electronic voting system, which has been been hailed by some as a model system for secure electronic voting. Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who was part of a security team that documented failings in the Estonian system, disagrees and is quoted in the article. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Algorithms Can be More Fair than Humans

In this article in The Conversation, Prof. H. V. Jagadish talks about how algorithms can discriminate, even when their designers don't intend that to happen, but they also can make detecting bias easier. He states, While it is tempting to believe data-driven decisions are unbiased, research and scholarly discussion are beginning to demonstrate that unfairness and discrimination remain. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Jagadish, HV  

Screen Savers: The World's Smallest Computer

The new episode of Screen Savers features Prof. David Blaauw, whose team has developed the world's smallest computer. The Michigan Micro Mote (M3) works as a fully functioning computer on the millimeter scale. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  Wentzloff, David  

Hackers Fool Tesla Autopilot Into Making Obstacles 'Disappear' -- But Don't Panic About Crashes Yet

Wenyuan Xu, a visiting professor at CSE from the University of South Carolina, is part of a research team that has developed techniques for sabotaging the sensors for the autopilot in a Tesla. This article in Forbes describes how the research team used three forms of attack to tick the Tesla. [Full Story]

Hackers Fool Tesla S's Autopilot to Hide and Spoof Obstacles

Wenyuan Xu, a visiting professor at CSE from the University of South Carolina, is part of a research team that has developed techniques for sabotaging the sensors for the autopilot in a Tesla. This article in Wired describes how they simulated an attack from an adjacent car equipped with sensor jamming equipment. [Full Story]

CSE Researchers Win Pwnie Award for Work on DROWN Attack

A research team that includes CSE PhD student David Adrian and Prof. J. Alex Halderman has been awarded the Pwnie Award for Best Cryptographic Attack at the BlackHat conference for their work on the DROWN attack. DROWN is a serious vulnerability that affects HTTPS and other services that rely on SSL and TLS, some of the essential cryptographic protocols for Internet security. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

How to Hack an Election in 7 Minutes

This in-depth article in Politico traces the history of "the Princeton group" -- a cadre of security experts, including Michigan's Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who grew out of Andrew Appel and Ed Felton's groups at Princeton and have influenced the conversation on the security of electronic voting. The article concludes with this remark from Halderman regarding the danger posed by state-sponsored cyber attackers: "We sit around all day and write research papers. But these people are full time exploiters. They're the professionals. We're the amateurs." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

The Adventures of a Blissfully Unaware Bipedal Robot at the Grassy Wave Field

Evan Ackerman writes: "Grizzle says that when it comes to MARLO trying to conquer the 'devious undulations' of the Wave Field, 'we have gotten farther than I thought we would, to be honest.' This is the sort of thing we like to hear from researchers and dont, usually: pleasant surprise about how well their robot is performing. For more details on how MARLO managed to get this far, we asked him a few specific questions." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Tiny Computer Has Enormous Potential

"The Computer History Museum in Mountain View, Calif., has a new addition - one that is at the cutting edge of new computer technology. It isnt a breakthrough new powerhouse in computing, but instead a computer so small that one of the devices can sit on the edge of a coin." It's the Michigan Micro Mote! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  

Students from the United States visiting various work groups of BrainLinks-BrainTools this summer

Four undergrad students participating in the International Program for the Advancement of Neurotechnology (IPAN)'s summer bootcamp visited the cluster of excellence at Freiburg University in Germany. The students received training in modern neuroscience research and tools. IPAN and the study abroad program are directed by Prof. Euisik Yoon. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brain  International Prog. for the Adv. of Neurotechnology  Undergraduate Students  Yoon, Euisik  

The DNC Leak Shows How Vulnerable This Election Is To Hacking

Security experts including Prof. J. Alex Halderman are quoted in this article about the security risks associated with electronic voting. Many studies conducted by Prof. Halderman and his contemporaries have demonstrated that elections based on electronic voting are at risk of manipulation - often without detection. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Reinforcement Renaissance

This article in Communications of the ACM reviews reinforcement learning and how it is complemented by deep learning in systems that aim to learn the way that humans do. Prof Satinder Singh Baveja is quoted in the article. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  

National Robotics Initiative: Celebrating Five Years, Looking Ahead

Move over, C-3PO and R2-D2! You may have been robot celebrities during the glory years of Star Wars, but next-generation robotics are the new, 21st century superstars. A recent event on Capitol Hill celebrated the five-year anniversary of the National Robotics Initiative. It also provided an opportunity for NRI-funded research groups to both display their accomplishments, and also encourage Congress to maintain this critical funding mechanism for robotics in the United States. Prof. Jessy Grizzle attended with a display on his work. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Software Systems  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

R&D's Scientist of the Year - Starting 50 Years Ago with the Pioneer

50 years ago R&D Magazine chose its very first recipient of the prestigious Scientist of the Year Award Emmett Leith. The professor of electrical engineering at the University of Michigan was presented with the honor for co-inventing the three-dimensional holography, better known as the technology of laser to help create 3D photography. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Holography  Lab-Optics and Photonics  

The Mr. Robot Hack Report: Ransomware and Owning the Smart Home

This article references work done by UM CSE researchers, led by Prof. Atul Prakash, who recently exposed vulnerabilities in the Samsung SmartThings platform that let them set off smoke alarms or even unlock doors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Prakash, Atul  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Clever Tool Shields Your Car From Hacks by Watching its Internal Clocks

In a paper they plan to present at the Usenix security conference next month, researchers led by Kang G. Shin, the Kevin and Nancy O'Connor Professor of Computer Science, describe an easy-to-assemble tool they call the Clock-based Intrusion Detection System, or CIDS. CIDS characterizes the clock inaccuracies of all of the processors in a car in order to spot the malicious messages that hackers use to take control of vehicle components like brakes and transmission. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Automotive industry  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  Shin, Kang G.  

Experimenting with Post-Quantum Cryptography

This Google blog post announces the company's decision to test post-quantum cryptography in Chrome, in which a small fraction of connections between desktop Chrome and Google's servers will use a post-quantum key-exchange algorithm in addition to the elliptic-curve key-exchange algorithm that would typically be used. The algorithm used in the test builds on work by Prof. Chris Peikert and his collaborators. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Data and Computing  Lab-Theory of Computation  Peikert, Chris  Quantum Computing  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Online voting would be disastrous because hackers could hijack the democratic process

This article frames the very real dangers of online voting and underscores them with examples from Prof. J. Alex Halderman's work in demonstrating weaknesses in the Estonian online voting system and Washington DC's 2010 attempt at an Internet voting system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

A Women's History of Silicon Valley

Too often, in Silicon Valley as in other places, women are involved in significant events, but their stories go untold. They are the cofounders who are not named in press articles. Check out this list of seven women who were key figures in the technologies that made Silicon Valley what it is today. Included on the list is Professor Emeritus Lynn Conway, who helped make large-scale chip production and innovation possible with her pivotal work on VLSI. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Conway, Lynn  Women in Computing  

Google snaps up startup in push to master computer vision

The future of computer vision looks bright following a string of tech acquisitions in the field, most recently by Google. Jason Corso offers his perspective on the future of computer vision and the challenges researchers have yet to overcome. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Vision  Corso, Jason  Lab-Systems  

Tesla crash raises concerns about autonomous vehicle regulation

The fatal crash of a Tesla Motors Inc Model S in Autopilot mode has turned up pressure on auto industry executives and regulators to ensure that automated driving technology is deployed safely. Jason Corso says the product is meant to be a beta test, and that the crash is a wake-up call to a need for significant further study. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Computer Vision  Corso, Jason  Lab-Systems  

Why experts worry about the Tesla crash

Jason Corso told the Detroit Free Press that Tesla's recent autopilot crash is "not a major setback, but an indication of the work still to do." The crash, which resulted in one fatality, occured when neither the automated system nor the driver recognized the white side of the semi-truck against a brightly lit sky. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Computer Vision  Corso, Jason  Lab-Systems  

Thorny Technical Questions Remain for Net Neutrality

In this article in The Conversation, Prof. Harsha Madhyastha examines the principle of network neutrality and makes the case for scenarios in which ISPs should be able to treat some differing types of traffic unequally. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Madhyastha, Harsha  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  

The Most Interesting Tech IPO of the Year

Twilio, founded by CS alumni Jeff Lawson, Evan Cooke, and John Wolthuis in 2007, went public on June 23 with shares closing up nearly 90 percent in the first day of trading. Quartz calls it "the most interesting tech IPO of the year." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Entrepreneurship  

James Freudenberg Takes Embedded Control Systems to Zurich

Prof. James Freudenberg taught his course, Embedded Control Systems, as a guest at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland. The school prepared a video highlighting the course, which provides a comprehensive overview of embedded control systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Freudenberg, James S.  Lab-Systems  

Video of the week: Injectable radio broadcasts through flesh in real-time

The Engineer highlighted research by Prof. David Wentzloff and David Blaauw on an injectable radio that can broadcast from inside the human body. This latest advance will enable the relay of information in real-time to devices monitoring heart fibrillation as well as glucose monitoring for diabetics. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Health  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Medical diagnosis  Millimeter-scale Computing  Wentzloff, David  

U-M professors know wonders, risks of self-driving cars

This article in the Free Press examines the work of Profs. Edwin Olson and Ryan Eustice as they take on their new roles heading up key research areas at Toyota's new Ann Arbor Toyota Research Institute location. Prof. Olson will lead Toyota's the perception thrust and Prof. Eustice will lead the mapping/localization effort. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Sony Wants to Push AIs to Learn From Their Own Experiences

Sony has invested in AI startup Cogitai to build intelligent systems that will learn from their own experiences in the world. Prof. Satinder Singh, the co-founder of Cogitai, discusses continual learning and the future of intelligent systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Malware Attacks Putting Patients' Medical Records at Risk

Prof. Kevin Fu talks to Michigan Radio about the recent news stories regarding some U.S. hospitals being hit by malware attacks. When hospitals are hit, patient records can be in danger. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Software Systems  Medical Device Security  

More Than 30 States Offer Online Voting, but Experts Warn it isnt Secure

This article revisits the question of online voting. Prof. Halderman cites a pilot project from six years ago in DC where the public was invited to attack a proposed Internet voting system. Halderman led a team that within 48 hours was able to gain nearly complete control of the server and change every vote. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  

MARLO the bipedal robot makes worldwide news coverage with her new steps

Jessy Grizzle and his students have their latest two-legged robot, MARLO, walking well over difficult terrain. The story started out on popular tech blogs and magazines like Engadget, Popular Science, VICE Motherboard, Gizmag and CNET. It was also covered by international English language publications such as the Daily Mail, International Business Times, the BBC, and the Canadian Discovery Channel (Daily Planet show). Other international coverage included French, Danish and Czech sites. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Software Systems  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Your Devices' Latest Feature? They Can Spy on Your Every Move

In The Converstation, Prof. HV Jagadish sheds light on how smart devices are a gateway for hackers to spy on you. Since devices are networked, they can communicate in ways we dont want them to and people can take control of these technologies to learn private information about you. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Jagadish, HV  Lab-Software Systems  Security (national and personal safety)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

For Michigan Professor, Computer Science is Much More Than a Job

This article reports on Prof. Jason Mars and his work in developing technologies for intelligent personal assistants, from the software for the assistants themselves to the servers that are required to run such software. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  

5 big challenges that self-driving cars still have to overcome

in this article, Prof. Edwin Olson comments on what are seen are the key challenges involved in deploying autonomous or assistive driving technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

UM professors, students lead startup with real-world uses for AI technology

This article profiles Clinc, the artificial intelligence startup founded by Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang with CSE graduate students Michael Laurenzano and Johann Hauswald. Clinc is based in Ann Arbor and uses intelligent personal assistant technology to fuel new applications. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Numbers Game

This article in Michigan Research examines the growing importance of sports analytics and describes the work of Prof. Jenna Wiens in using machine learning to extract information from NBA sports data for automatically recognizing common defense strategies to ball screens. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Wiens, Jenna  

Google Self-Driving Car Will Be Ready Soon for Some, in Decades for Others

This article reports on a talk given by Chris Urmson, Google self-driving car project director, at the SXSW conference, in which he seemed to reset expectations regarding the arrival autonomous vehicles. The article includes comments by Prof. Edwin Olson, who researches self-driving cars at UM and who is quite familiar with the technical challenges that remain to be addressed before such vehicles become ubiquitous. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Attack against TLS shows the pitfalls of weakening encryption

This article describes how, for the third time in a year, security researchers including Prof. J. Alex Halderman have found a method to attack encrypted Web communications, a direct result of weaknesses that were mandated two decades ago by the U.S. government. The latest instance is the DROWN attack. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

'Thousands of popular sites' at risk of Drown hack attacks

This article describes how researchers including Prof. J. Alex Halderman have discovered a new way to disable popular internet encryption protocols. Their "DROWN" attack takes advantage of past government rules against strong encryption in technology to be exported. The rules have since changed, but the effects live on. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Drown attack: how weakened encryption jeopardizes 'secure' sites

This article describes how researchers including Prof. J. Alex Halderman have succeeded in attacking "secure" connections that are used in email, news and entertainment services. The article notes that the technique could affect up to one third of all websites that use secure communications and is a legacy of past efforts to water down online encryption. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

How to know when your boss is lying to you

This article in Mashable describes "tells" for when someone is lying. It includes a mention of new software developed by Prof. Rada Mihalcea and her collaborators that is better able to identify deception than human observers are. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

President Obama Announces Computer Science for All

President Obama has announced a new Computer Science for All initiative to empower all American students from kindergarten through high school to learn CS and be equipped with the computational thinking skills they need to be creators in the digital economy, not just consumers, and to be active citizens in our technology-driven world. [Full Story]

Internet voting is just too hackable, say security experts

This article revisits the question of Internet voting, and reviews the reasons why these systems have been proven unreliable in the past. Prof. J. Alex Halderman, a prominent researcher in this area who has demonstrated vulnerabilities in many types of electronic voting systems, is quoted: "Imagine the incentives of a rival country to come in and change the outcome of a vote for national leadership. Elections require correct outcomes and true ballot secrecy." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Driverless cars work great in sunny California. But how about in a blizzard?

This article quotes Prof. Edwin Olson regarding the research he is doing in conjunction with Ford on autonomous vehicles and their use in conditions that include snow-covered roads. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Even your academic advisor might one day be a robot

This article in Engadget highlights the new research collaboration between Michigan and IBM, which is aimed at building a conversationally-driven, artificially intelligent academic advisor that guides undergraduate students through their course options [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Cybersecurity Startup QuadMetrics Calculates Odds a Company Will be Breached

As reported by the Wall Street Journal, QuadMetrics Inc. says it can predict with greater than 90% accuracy the likelihood that a company will be breached within the next year. QuadMetrics cloud service determines the probability of a breach at a particular company by collecting from its network more than 250 different data points. The company was co-founded by Prof. Mingyan Liu. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  Liu, Mingyan  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

The Story of a Digital Teddy Bear Shows How College Learning Is Changing

This story highlights the changing nature of education, driven in part by computationally-enabled entrepreneurship. Hackathons such as MHacks at U-M and other "outside the classroom" activities have created new opportunities for students to manage their own educations. The digital teddy bears highlighted in the story came to life as a project at MHacks 6. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Entrepreneurship  

Researchers make progress on holy grail of autonomous vehicles: driving in snow

This story by Michigan Radio talks about testing autonomous cars on snow covered roads. The new research was done by Profs. Edwin Olson and Ryan Eustice in collaboration with Ford. The new research shows it's possible for a self-driving car to get around using highly detailed 3D maps of everything that surrounds the vehicle. The news was also featured in their top of the hour news summary, please click here to listen. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Fairy doors appear on University of Michigan's North Campus

San Francisco's SF Gate has noted the appearance of Fairy Doors on North Campus, including the first -- discovered by Prof. Rada Mihalcea, her daughter, and research fellow Carmen Banea -- which was found in CSE's Beyster Building. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hacking  Mihalcea, Rada  

Ford tests driverless cars in snow at U-M's Mcity

This article in MLive covers work done by Profs. Edwin Olson and Ryan Eustice in collaboration with Ford at Mcity, in which the researchers have tested new technology that allows autonomous vehicles to navigate on snow-covered streets. Their solution combines live LIDAR data with learned 3D map stores to enable the systems to compute location and to drive successfully. It is believed that this is the first test to address the challenges of snow-covered roads. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Fairy doors appearing on U-M's North Campus

This story in MLive reports on the recent appearances of Fairy Doors on North Campus. The first, discovered by Prof. Rada Mihalcea, her daughter, and research fellow Carmen Banea, was found in CSE's Beyster Building. Since then, the story reports, two more have been found in the Chrysler Center. We're glad the fairies have come to stay! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hacking  Mihalcea, Rada  

The 'skyscraper chip' that could boost the power of computers by a THOUSAND

This arrticle highlights the called Nano-Engineered Computing Systems Technology (N3XT) project, a carbon nanotube transistor based stacked mricochip architecture under development by researchers at Stanford, Michigan, CMU, and UC Berkeley, including Prof. Igor Markov. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Markov, Igor  

How computers are getting better at detecting liars

This article highlights the lie-detecting software that was created by Prof. Rada Mihalcea. Using videos from high-stakes court cases, the researchers have built a lie-detecting software database that uses a persons words and gestures to detect behavioral patterns that may be out of the norm. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

New software analyses words, gestures to detect lies

This Economic Times article highlights Prof. Rada Mihalceas research. She is developing a unique lie-detecting software that considers both the speaker's words and gestures, and unlike a polygraph, does not need to touch the subject in order to work. By studying videos from high-stakes court cases she is building the lie-detecting software based on real-world data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

A Search Engine for the Internets Dirty Secrets

This MIT Technology Review article highlights a new search engine called Censys, which aims to help security researchers find specific hosts and create aggregate reports by tracking all the devices hooked up to it. Data is harvested through the software ZMap and the researchers are trying to maintain a complete database of everything on the Internet. The open-sourced project is led by CSE graduate student Zakir Durumeric. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (national and personal safety)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Why medical devices are so hard to secure

In this article, Prof. Kevin Fu addresses the security of medical devices. Many of the aging medical devices still in wide use in hospitals across the U.S. were built without much consideration for security controls. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Software Systems  Security (national and personal safety)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Medical device security? Forget hackers, think 'hand-washing'

In this article, Prof. Kevin Fu talks about the potentially dangerous faults in implants and bedside devices. Fu states, if you're using this old software, these old operating systems, you're vulnerable to all that malware that garden-variety malware that has been out in the wild for more than 10 years. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Software Systems  Security (national and personal safety)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Could hackers break my heart via my pacemaker?

This BBC article highlights Prof. Kevin Fu's first peer-reviewed paper describing an attack on a heart device. Fu and his team made a combination pacemaker and defibrillator deliver electric shocks, a potentially fatal hack had the device been in a patient rather than a computing lab. The article addresses the publics concern about the security of pacemakers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Software Systems  Security (national and personal safety)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Creating a formula to detect lies in the face (Spanish)

This article reports on research conducted by Prof. Rada Mihalcea and her collaborators in the area of deception detection. The researchers have produced a computer algorithm that is significantly better at spotting lies in courtroom testimony than humans are. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Language and Text Processing  Machine Learning  Mihalcea, Rada  

New Research: Encouraging trends and emerging threats in email security

This Google security blog entry highlights recent findings from an analysis of email delivery security. Google will leverage the findings to improve the security provided through its Gmail service and to warn its users when messages are not secure. The study was conducted by Michigan researchers J. Alex Halderman, Zakir Durumeric, David Adrian, Ariana Mirian, and James Kasten along with rsearchers from the University of Illinois and Google. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Gmail Will Soon Warn Users When Emails Arrive Over Unencrypted Connections

This article in Tech Crunch highlights recent findings from an analysis of email delivery security. Google will leverage the findings to improve the security provided through its Gmail service and to warn its users when messages are not secure. The study was conducted by Michigan researchers J. Alex Halderman, Zakir Durumeric, David Adrian, Ariana Mirian, and James Kasten along with rsearchers from the University of Illinois and Google. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Soon We Will Hunt Like Predator With This New Night-Vision Sensor

Graphene could make it possible to build ultra-thin, flexible thermal sensors for built-in night vision technology just like that lethal alien in the Predator franchise. Last year, Zhaohui Zhong created a prototype graphene-based contact lens that could image IR at room-temperature. That device is about the size of a fingernail and could be scaled down further, making it suitable for contact lenses or arrays of infrared camera sensors for wearable electronics. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graphene  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Zhong, Zhaohui  

Lie-detecting algorithm spots fibbing faces better than humans

This article in New Scientist highlights the work of postdoctoral fellows Veronica Perez-Rosas and Mohamed Abouelenien, Prof. Rada Mihalcea, and Prof. Mihai Burzo in using machine learning to detect whether a person is being deceptive or not. The system outperforms the best human interrogators. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Language and Text Processing  Machine Learning  Mihalcea, Rada  

Email Encryption is Broken

This article in Motherboard highlights research which found that large chunks of email traffic are being deliberately stripped of their encryption, or just sent without any in the first place, leaving them totally open to passive eavesdroppers. Amongst the study's authors are Prof. J. Alex Halderman and CSE graduate students Zakir Durumeric, David Adrian, Ariana Mirian, and James Kasten. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Bright Blue PHOLEDs Almost Ready for TV

A new energy-efficient organic LED (OLED) that glows a deep blue is finally close to meeting the most stringent U.S. video display brightness requirements, researchers say. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Displays  Forrest, Stephen  LEDs  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

This Common Cryptography Method Is Alarmingly Vulnerable

This blog posting on Slate examines the recent paper presented by Prof. Halderman and other researchers at the ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security. The paper reveals the vulnerabilities of the Diffie-Hellman key exchange, which is a method for two parties to securely share a cryptographic key that was first published in 1976 and is widely used. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (national and personal safety)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

How the NSA can Break Trillions of Encrypted Web and VPN connections

Privacy advocates have pushed developers of websites, virtual private network apps, and other cryptographic software to adopt the Diffie-Hellman cryptographic key exchange as a defense against surveillance from the US National Security Agency and other state-sponsored spies. Now, Prof. Alex Halderman and other researchers are renewing their warning that a serious flaw in the way the key exchange is implemented is allowing the NSA to break and eavesdrop on trillions of encrypted connections. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (national and personal safety)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Research Shows How NSA Exploits Flaws to Decrypt Huge Amounts of Communications Instead of Securing the Internet

According to an award-winning paper, which was co-authored by Prof. Alex Halderman, the NSA has likely used its access to vast computing power as well as weaknesses in the commonly used TLS security protocol in order to spy on encrypted communications. The paper represents a major contribution to public understanding by drawing a link between the NSAs computing resources and previously known cryptographic weaknesses. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (national and personal safety)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

NSA may be Breaking Popular Algorithm

A popular algorithm, known as the Diffie-Hellman key exchange, is vulnerable to state-sponsored attackers, according to a new research paper presented at the ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security, which was co-authored by Prof. Alex Halderman. Diffie-Hellman is used to secure websites, email and other protocols. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (national and personal safety)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Bosch's popular diesel engine software was not preprogrammed to cheat

Jim Freudenberg, ECE professor and director of the automotive engineering master's program, commented on automotive software that can detect road conditions. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Freudenberg, James S.  

From search to distributed computing to large-scale information extraction

Prof. Michael Cafarella was interviewed for the O'Reilly Daily Show Podcast, and excerpts from that conversation are published here. In the interview, he talks about the origins of Nutch, Hadoop (HDFS, MapReduce), HBase, and his decision to pursue an academic career and step away from these projects. They also discussed ClearCutAnalytics, his startup to commercialize a highly regarded academic project for structured data extraction. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Cafarella, Michael  Lab-Software Systems  

Brilliant 10: Alex Halderman Strengthens Democracy Using Software

For the 14th year, Popular Science honors the brightest young minds in science and engineering. Prof. J. Alex Halderman has been named one of their Brilliant 10 for exposing the vulnerabilities in electronic-voting systems and working with governments to make them more secure. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Michigan's Bi-Ped Robots on the Big Ten Network

MARLO the bi-pedal robot was the subject of a special spot on the Big Ten Network, which premiered during Saturday's football game against UNLV. Go Blue! Pictured are Brent Griffin and Brian Buss, members of Prof. Jessy Grizzle's research group. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Silicon Valley, Seeking Diversity, Focuses on Blacks

This article in the New York Times reports on the diversity gap in Silicon Valley and describes some of the new efforts being undertaken to help black students to bridge the opportunity gap. EECS alumnus Erin Teague, director of product management at Yahoo, is quoted on her experience. "I didnt know what to dream for." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Diversity and Outreach  

Online security braces for quantum revolution

This article in Nature examines the security ramifications of quantum computers, which are expected to be a reality in the next 5 to 30 years. The article references work in the area of lattice based cryptography done by Prof. Chris Peikert and his collaborators. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Theory of Computation  Peikert, Chris  Security and Privacy (Computing)  Theory of Computation  

A Tricky Path to Quantum-Safe Encryption

This article in Quanta Magazine examines the security ramifications of quantum computers, which are expected to be a reality in the next 5 to 30 years. The article references work in the area of lattice based cryptography done by Prof. Chris Peikert and his collaborators. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Theory of Computation  Peikert, Chris  Security and Privacy (Computing)  Theory of Computation  

IBMs Rodent Brain Chip Could Make Our Phones Hyper-Smart

In this MSN article, Prof. Jason Mars comments on TrueNorth, a chip created by IBM that has the same number of neurons as a small rodent brain. This chip can run deep learning algorithms in smaller spaces with considerably less electrical power, which will allow more AI onto phones and other tiny devices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  

Can hackers take over Ann Arbor's traffic signals? U-M researcher discusses

In this MLive article about the security of municipal traffic signal systems, the work of CSE graduate student Branden Ghena is highlighted. Ghena received permission to hack the traffic lights at an unnamed Michigan municipality in 2014, where he quickly demonstrated how signals could be taken under the control of a hacker. Ann Arbor's system, he notes, is hardwired and would require a direct connection, rather than a wireless connection, to hack. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Can hackers take over traffic lights?

In this Washingtion Post article about the security of municipal traffic signal systems, the work of CSE graduate student Branden Ghena is highlighted. Ghena received permission to hack the traffic lights at an unnamed Michigan municipality in 2014, where he quickly demonstrated how signals could be taken under the control of a hacker. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

The Conversation: Big Data analyses depend on starting with clean data points

Join The Conversation about big data, where Prof. HV Jagadish has written about the need to avoid inaccuracies in large data sets and how an emphasis on clean data should motivate data collection and processing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Jagadish, HV  Lab-Software Systems  

Two sentences explaining why your self-driving car wont have a steering wheel

Prof. Edwin Olson comments on why, once an autonomous vehicles is operating, it is actually difficult for a human occupant to take control in an emergency. Prof. Olson is working on projects related to autonomous vehicles and transportation systems at the newly-opened Mcity test facility. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Scientists warn against Artificial Intelligence weapons

Prof. Michael Wellman confirms that the potential for danger from automated weapons systems should be taken seriously in this story that appeared on Detroit ABC affiliate WXYZ. Prof. Wellman was one of over a thousand AI researchers who recently signed a letter to the UN urging them to ban robotic weapons. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

The race is on to figure out what self-driving cars should look like

In this Washington Post article, Prof. Edwin Olson notes that we don't know what autonomous vehicles might look like in the future, since autonomy will change many factors in the way transportation is scheduled and executed. Prof. Olson has just launched a project to study a transportation on demand system built around autonomous vehicles. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Why Are Computers So Bad At Jokes?

What is funniness? Can it possibly be quantitative? And why is it so difficult to define -- for, say, a mechanical reproduction of it? These are questions that have plagued scientists for decades. And its the central question that brought together an incredibly diverse group of authors on a new paper looking for an answer, including Prof. Dragomir Radev; The New Yorker's Cartoon Editor, Bob Mankoff; and scientists from Yahoo! and Columbia. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Radev, Dragomir  

3-D Printed Cars Emerging; Early Units will Serve as Testbed for On-Demand System at Michigan

Prof. Edwin Olson will be using 3-D printed low-speed electric vehicles provided by alternative carmaker Local Motors to develop a transportation on demand system built around autonomous vehicles. He is quotes in the article about Local Motors' plans. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

U-M to Test Driverless 3-D Printed Carts

in this article, the Detroit News reports on the University of Michigan's plans to test low-speed, 3-D printed driverless carts within the year and eventually deploy them on its North Campus. Researches led b Prof. Edwin Olson will use the carts to develop an automated on-demand transportation system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Two-legged robot with human feet can now walk independently

Brent Griffin, doctoral student in ECE, was interviewed by Popular Science about his research with Prof. Jessy Grizzle on bipedal robots. He says a bipedal robot would have access to terrain that is not accessible to wheeled vehicles, and that they would be able to more seamlessly navigate our human-built world, including ladders and stairs. There's proof in all of us that bipedal walking can be stable, says Griffin. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Worlds smallest computer can fit on the edge of a nickel

David Blaauw, Dennis Sylvester, David Wentzloff, and Prabal Dutta, as well as several graduate students, have developed tiny computing units (on a millimeter scale) that are capable of harvesting solar power to utilize wireless communication, pressure and temperature sensors, and even still image and video processing. Ready for production now, the M3 is expected to see use in the medical field for monitoring human body processes, as well as conducting EKGs and detecting and monitoring tumor growth. Harkening back to scenes from the 1966 film Fantastic Voyage or 1987s Innerspace, the M3 can actually be injected into the body to perform some of these functions. [Full Story]

Stryd, co-founded by Prof. Robert Dick, Selected as Part of the 2015 Techstars Class

Stryd, co-founded by Prof. Robert Dick, has been chosen as one of ten companies in the 2015 Techstars class in Boulder, CO. Techstars provides mentorship and seed funding to select companies in different locations nationwide. Stryd applies the concept of power output to a wearable device for runners to help them improve their performance, [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dick, Robert  Entrepreneurship  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Technology Transfer  Wearable electronics  

Prof. Kevin Fu Testifies on the IRS Data Breach for Senate Committee

As reported on the Computing Community Consortium blog, Prof. Kevin Fu was one of the five witnesses to testify to the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security & Governmental Affairs at a hearing on "The IRS Data Break: Steps to Protect Americans Personal Information." Video from the hearing is available here; Prof. Fu speaks at about 13:00. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (national and personal safety)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Massive Clinton-era Internet bug shows pitfalls of Obama's 'backdoor' proposal

In this CNN Money article, Prof. J. Alex Halderman is quoted regarding the FBI's request for security backdoors in technology products. "It's a bad idea," he says. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Rumor-detector software IDs disputed claims on Twitter

Prof. Qiaozhu Mei and a team of researchers have developed software to help society identify and correct erroneous claims on Twitter. They introduced the software recently at the International World Wide Web Conference in Florence, Italy. Later this summer, they hope to put it in practice at a website they're developing called Rumor Lens. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Mei, Qiaozhu  

New data science major aligns with growing corporate needs

The Michigan Daily reports on the new data science major, which will be subsumed under the Computer Science and Engineering division and the Statistics Department. The new major will be available in Fall 2015 to both LSA and Engineering students. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Prakash, Atul  

New Computer Bug Exposes Broad Security Flaws

The Wall Street Journal reports on the newly-discovered Logjam bug, which could allow an attacker to read or alter communications that claim to be secure and may have been exploited by the National Security Agency to spy on virtual private networks, or VPNs. The vulnerability could also be exploited by hackers. CSE Graduate student Zakir Durumeric, one of the researchers working on the bug, is quoted in the article. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Your House Is Your Next Fit Band

This article in Discovery highlights a Wi-Fi based approach to a local area fitness monitoring system prototyped at MIT. It includes commentary by U-M Prof. Fu, who sees potential for the system, especially in cases where typical sensor placement is not viable. He does, however, have concerns about WiFi security for medical data transmission. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Digital democracy: will 2015 be the last paper-based general election?

There is a growing call for on-line voting in the UK with Estonia's system seen by some as a model, as discussed in this article in The Telegraph. However, work by Prof. J. Alex Halderman and others, including Halderman's 2014 assessment of the Estonian systems, point to major risks in the system [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

US hospitals to treat medical device malware with AC power probes

This article in The Register highlights plans for testing in two hospitals of a system that can detect malware infections on medical equipment by monitoring AC power consumption. Former CSE postdoc Denis Foo Kune developed the technology, called WattsUpDoc, with Prof. Kevin Fu and others while at Michigan. They have commercialized it through their startup, Virta Labs. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  

13 Of 2015s Hottest Topics In Computer Science Research

In this contributed piece on Forbes, Prof. Igor Markov presents his view of where computer science research will be focused in the near term. It's a list worth reviewing! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Markov, Igor  

At 50 Years Old, The Challenge To Keep Up With Moores Law

NPRs All Tech Considered: Fifty years ago this week, a chemist in what is now Silicon Valley published a paper that set the groundwork for the digital revolution. That man was Gordon Moore. Moores Law is all about electronic miniaturization, and the article talks about the worlds smallest computer, the Michigan Micro Mote, currently on display at the Computer History Museum. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Dutta, Prabal  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  Wentzloff, David  

The Crazy-Tiny Next Generation of Computers

This article in Medium describes Prof. Prabal Dutta's interest in Smart Dust - a network of tiny, sensor-enabled autonomous computers - and its ability to to measure everyday data to solve issues of critical sustainability. It traces how he began collaborating with Profs. David Blaauw and Dennis Sylvester on the development of the Michigan Micro Mote (M3), which is now the world's smallest and first millimeter scale computer. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Dutta, Prabal  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  

Machine politics: Electronic voting and the persistent doubts about its integrity

Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his collaborator Dr. Vanessa Teague are interviewed on Up Close, the research talk show from the University of Melbourne, about their work in investigating the iVote system recently used in New South Wales and about the security challenges of electronic voting in general. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

OpenSource.com: A case for predictable databases

Prof. Barzan Mozafari is interviewed in this Q&A on OpenSource.com about his open source DBSeer and DBSherlock database tools, and about guaranteeing a consistent and predictable level of performance is cloud-based database systems [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Mozafari, Barzan  

This is the worlds smallest computer

CBS News did a video and story about the Michigan Micro Mote (M3), which is the world's smallest computer and the world's first millimeter scale computer. "As the Internet of Things (IoT) gets bigger, the Michigan team is pushing to make computers ever smaller." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  

Why you arent voting for Chicago mayor from a smartphone

This article in the Chicago Tribune summarizes why Chicago voters won't be casting online votes in April 7's mayoral runoff election. Although other transactions can be accomplished by smartphone, "the shape of the problem is fundamentally different than things we routinely do online today," says Prof. J. Alex Halderman in the article. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

The Hackathon Fast Track, From Campus to Silicon Valley

This article in the New York Times examines the phenomenon of hackathons and how they have become a new fast track to success in the tech industry. Quoted are CS major and director of the past two MHacks, Vikram Rajagopalan, as well as David Fontenot, a former MHacks director. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

Smart Phone Apps: An Interview with Prof. Georg Essl (in German)

Prof. Georg Essl is interviewed on German public radio (WDR) on the subject of smart phone apps and their potential as musical instruments. The interview includes numerous musical examples from Essl's Michigan Mobile Phone Ensemble. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Essl, Georg  Lab-Interactive Systems  Mobile and Networked Computing  

Our Data, Our Health. A Future Tense Event Recap.

This blog posting on Slate addresses threats to medical device security and highlights the thoughts of Prof. Kevin Fu on the matter. Prof. Fu directs the Archimedes Medical Device Research Center at Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Probing the Whole Internet for Weak Spots

This article in MIT Technology Review profiles the work of CSE graduate student Zakir Durumeric. Durumeric led in the development of ZMap, the software capable of probing the entire public Internet in less than an hour. Through the use of ZMap, Durumeric was first person to realize the scope of the FREAK flaw. His use of ZMap was also pivotal to researchers' understanding of the recent Heartbleed flaw. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

ECE spinoff Arborlight gets $1.7M in VC funding to commercialize new lighting technology

"Arborlight wants every indoor space to be able to reap the benefits of natural -- or as close to natural -- sunlight, and thanks to a $1.7 million venture capital investment, the company is one step closer to that goal." Arborlight is co-founded by Prof. P.C. Ku. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Ku, Pei-Cheng (P.C.)  Technology Transfer  

U-M Develops Controls for Bipedal Robots with Model-Based Design

Developing a two-legged robot capable of walking and running like a human is a key goal for robotics researchers. In 2011, Professor Jessy Grizzle and a small team of Ph.D. students advanced toward that goal with MABEL, a bipedal robot that could run a nine-minute mile and regain its balance after negotiating an eight-inch step. When MABEL's successor, MARLO, needed new coding, the researchers moved away from hand-coding, and used Model-Based Design with MATLAB and Simulink to speed up the development of real-time control systems for MARLO and other bipedal robots. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Voice Control Will Force an Overhaul of the Whole Internet

This article in Wired reports on Sirius, the open-source personal digital assistant released by Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang and graduate student Johann Hauswald. It focused in in the projects underlying thrust: that the data centers of today are not built to accommodate the voice-based data loads of tomorrow. Sirius is a tool that will help researchers to understand the needs of next-generation data centers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  Warehouse-Scale and Parallel Systems  

Critical iVote security flaws expose risk of online voting fraud

This article in CNet covers the discovery of a security flaw in the the online voting system used in New South Wales during the current election. The researchers included Prof. J. Alex Halderman and Dr. Vanessa Teague of the University of Melbourne. [Full Story]

Australian online voting system may have FREAK bug

This article in The Register covers the discovery of a security flaw in the the online voting system used in New South Wales during the current election. The researchers included Prof. J. Alex Halderman and Dr. Vanessa Teague of the University of Melbourne. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

NSW election result could be challenged over iVote security flaw

This article in The Guardian covers the discovery of a security flaw in the the online voting system used in New South Wales during the current election. The researchers included Prof. J. Alex Halderman and Dr. Vanessa Teague of the University of Melbourne. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Edwin Olson: Driverless Cars (radio interview)

In this radio interview on Newstalk ZB in New Zealand, Prof. Edwin Olson discusses the future of autonomous vehicles, how autonomy might be introduced into the marketplace, and M City, the automated test track for autonomous vehicle research and testing at Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Researchers just built a free, open-source version of Siri

This article in VentureBeat reports on Sirius, the open-source intelligent personal assistant software introduced by CSE Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang, along with graduate student Johann Hauswald. It focuses on the open-source nature of Sirius and quotes the researchers regarding its possibilities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  Warehouse-Scale and Parallel Systems  

Engineers Bring A New Open-Source Siri To Life

This article in readwrite reports on Sirius, the open-source intelligent personal assistant software introduced by CSE Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang, along with graduate student Johann Hauswald. It focuses in part on the open-source nature of Sirius and the potential that creates for anyone to create a customized personal assistant. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  Warehouse-Scale and Parallel Systems  

Free Sirius One-Ups Siri

This article in EE Times reports on Sirius, the open-source intelligent personal assistant software introduced by CSE Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang, along with graduate student Johann Hauswald. The article focuses in part on Sirius's ability to process photos. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  Warehouse-Scale and Parallel Systems  

What You Tweet Might Tell Janet Yellen Its Time to Raise Rates

Economists at the Fed are looking into whether non-traditional data could improve the accuracy and timeliness of the forecasts they put before monetary-policy decision makers about every six weeks. This could include Prof. Mike Cafarella's social media tool that monitors tweets to create an index of initial claims for unemployment. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Cafarella, Michael  Data and Computing  Lab-Software Systems  

Sirius Is the Google-Backed Open Source Siri

This article in Motherboard discusses Sirius, the open-source digital assistant developed by CSE researchers, its ability to process images, its open-source roots, and ultimately reflects on its utility versus a past attempt in this realm. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  Warehouse-Scale and Parallel Systems  

Chappie ponders future of humans in a world run on artificial intelligence

Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja is quoted in this article in The Washington Times on the emergence of artificial intelligence and the need for controls to be established before AI can operate independently of human oversight. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Security Concerns Raised Regarding Clinton Offices Use of Private Email

Prof. J. Alex Halderman is quoted regarding security concerns in this Al Jazeera America article on Hillary Clinton's use of a private email service while in office as Secretary of State. Prof. Halderman has previously demonstrated vulnerabilities in the security of a number of trusted systems, including airport body scanners and electronic voting systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Outdated Encryption Keys Leave Phones Vulnerable to Hackers

Prof. J. Alex Halderman and CSE graduate student Zakir Durumeric have used their ZMap scanning software to determine that of the 14 million web sites worldwide that offer encryption, more than 5 million remain vulnerable to the FREAK encryption flaw as of March 4. Prof. Halderman is quoted on the danger of weak crypto and "back doors" in this New York Times article on the subject. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (national and personal safety)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Researchers Map Extent of FREAK Security Flaw

Prof. J. Alex Halderman and CSE graduate student Zakir Durumeric have used their ZMap scanning software to determine that of the 14 million web sites worldwide that offer encryption, more than 5 million remain vulnerable to the FREAK encryption flaw as of March 4. The U-M researchers are part of a broad effort that has demonstrated the dangers inherent in the older 512-bit encryption code that is still in use. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (national and personal safety)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Careers in Robotics: Spotlight on the University of Michigan

This article in Robotics Business Review takes a look at robotics research at Michigan, in particular the work in perception and autonomy that is being conducted by Profs. Edwin Olson and Ryan Eustice. It also examines how that research is a key ingredient in the work to be done on autonomous vehicles at Michigan's new Mobility Transportation Center. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Robots In Our Image

If two-legged locomotion is the next frontier for robotics, Prof. Jessy Grizzle and his team are setting the standard for graceful, human-like walking by robots. He talks about his own robot, MARLO, in the context of the upcoming DARPA Robotics Challenge. MARLO is not entered, but is making great strides here at the University of Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

Cooking robot may offer artificial culinary intelligence

Prof. Jason Corso was asked to comment on research that involved the use of artificial intelligence to provide robots with the ability to recognize objects and learn actions by watching humans. In this case, the robot was watching a video. He said it is possible to reconstruct the 3D environment (2D space plus time) that is being shown in the video. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Corso, Jason  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Distinguished University Professor lecture involves walking robots

Despite tremendous advances in the field of two-legged robots during the past few decades, bipedal machines are a long way from impersonating, much less improving upon, the human gait. In his inaugural lecture as the Elmer G. Gilbert Distinguished University Professor of Engineering, Jessy Grizzle will discuss the efforts underway in his lab to close this gap. All are welcome at the lecture, Feb. 4 at 4pm in the Rackham Amphitheatre. A reception will follow in the Assembly Hall. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  

Coding For Kids: Teaching Girls, Minorities To Program Important For A Diverse Tech Workforce

This story on the International Business Times website speaks about creating a new generation of programmers by reaching out to demographics that historically haven't considered coding as a profession. In it, Prof. Elliot Soloway says, "Coding is about giving kids the new pencil and paper, it's giving them the new typewriter, the new tool to say things that they couldn't say before." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Data and Computing  Diversity and Outreach  Soloway, Elliot  

How drones and insects merged in ways that might surprise you

Michigan is designing the microelectronics that are the eyes, ears, and brains of the tiny insect-like drones being developed under the Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology (MAST) collaborative. The research at Michigan is part of the Center for Objective Microelectronics & Biomemetic Advanced Technology, directed by Prof. Kamal Sarabandi. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  MEMS and Microsystems  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Arborlight: LED-Based Skylights and Sunshine in Real Time

Prof. Pei-cheng Ku is a co-founder of the startup company Arborlight, which promises the benefits of a window or skylight in offices where neither is available. Xconomy reports that their "Lightwell product looks and behaves just like a skylight. It tunes to geography and time, tracking the position of the sun throughout the day, mimicking the varying color, intensity, and directionality of daylight as normally experienced through traditional windows and skylights." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Ku, Pei-Cheng (P.C.)  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Technology Transfer  

Stryd, co-founded by Prof. Robert Dick, about to launch wearable technology for runners

Prof. Robert Dick is co-founder of Stryd, a startup company that is getting ready to launch what they are calling the worlds first wearable power meter for runners. The device promises to help runners improve efficiency, monitor individual progress, and simplify training. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dick, Robert  Embedded Computing and Systems  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Technology Transfer  

Olson on Mobility Transformation Facility

In this audio interview, Prof. Edwin Olson speaks about the 36-acre Mobility Transformation Facility at Michigan and his work in developing and testing technologies for use in autonomous vehicles. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Talking Book trial to help poorest of poor in Ghana

[BBC News: Nov 20] Hundreds of handheld audio computers, called Talking Books, are to be given to some of Ghana's poorest communities to help spread potentially life-saving information. Leading the low power chip design for the devices at Michigan are Profs. David Blaauw and Peter Chen. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Chen, Peter M.  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  

Can Hackers Get Into Your Pacemaker?

Prof. Kevin Fu is quoted in this article in The Atlantic, which summarizes a number of factors that contribute toward vulnerabilities in medical devices like insulin pumps, defibrillators, fetal monitors, and scanners. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Medical Device Security  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Ambiq Micro Announces $15 Million Funding Round

ECE startup Ambiq Micro, a leader in ultra-low power integrated circuits for power-sensitive applications, announced that is has closed a $15 million Series C funding round to accelerate the development and marketing of its SPOT (Subthreshold Power Optimized Technology) platform. [More about Ambiq Micro] [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Technology Transfer  

Technological implants will allow us to improve our bodily functions

Trans-humanism isn't just about appearance. Bulky night-vision goggles have been used for years by the armed forces, but scientists at the University of Michigan [Prof. Zhaohui Zhong and his group] recently unveiled technology that could lead to contact lenses that allow the wearer to see in the dark. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graphene  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Wearable electronics  Zhong, Zhaohui  

Estonia has online voting. Should the United States?

Vox takes a look at voting in Estonia, a country that is an early adopter of online voting. The article notes that the convenience of the system is outweighed by the security risks inherent in such systems and references the work done by Prof. J. Alex Halderman in exposing weaknesses in the Estonian system and in an earlier proposed system in Washington DC. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Hackers Could Decide Who Controls Congress Thanks to Alaskas Terrible Internet Ballots

In today's elections, Alaska will use its first-in-the-nation Internet voting system in today's mid-term elections -- a move that top security experts, including Prof. J. Alex Halderman, consider a security nightmare that could put control of the US Congress in the hands of hackers. More in this article at The Intercept. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Decode DC: The Future of Voting. Prof J. Alex Halderman Interviewed on Electronic Voting

In this podcast, host Andrea Seabrook and Decode DC reporter Miranda Green explore the potential benefits and risks of on-line voting. Coming down in the side of caution is Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who has demonstrated security vulnerabilities in voting systems worldwide and who says that "the problem with voting and computer technology is that hackers can change the election result to be whatever they want." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Rise of e-voting is inevitable, as is risk of hacking

As elections approach in both Canada and the US, more municipalities are considering the use of Internet voting or electronic voting machines. This article in the Globe and Mail describes some of the risks associated with this trend and references the work that was done during the last national election cycle when Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his students hacked the proposed Washington DC Internet voting system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

New Jersey e-vote experiment after Sandy declared a disaster

This article in Aljazeera America details research into the security of electronic voting that was taken up in New Jersey following Hurricane Sandy. Prof. J. Alex Halderman is quoted in long form in the article. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

UM Professor Named one of Brilliant 10 for Building Energy Scavenging Sensors

Prof. Prabal Dutta was interviewed on Michigan Radio's Stateside segment regarding his work on energy scavenging sensors, called smart dust, that won't need batteries to operate. Listen to the interview here. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dutta, Prabal  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Prof. Kevin Fu Answers Your Questions About Medical Device Security

in this Slashdot posting, Prof. Fu answers submitted questions about the security of medical devices, with subjects ranging from attack surfaces for drug-administering pumps to what to do if you've been the recipient of a hackable implant. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

3 Lessons American Districts Can Learn From Foreign Schools

THE Journal reviews new approaches to learning that US K-12 schools are investigating, including work by Prof. Elliot Soloway into the use of smartphones as educational aids. Prof. Soloway has worked with schools in Singapore on an inquiry-based approach to learning that employs mobile technology, and he is now working to bring this same approach back to local schools. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Interactive Systems  Soloway, Elliot  Technology for Education  

Long-Lived Blue OLED Could Lead to Better Displays

Many displays in smartphones and televisions generate red and green light with phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes but use more energy-hungry fluorescent devices for blue. That's because blue PHOLEDs only last for a couple of days. Now Prof. Stephen Forrest and his group have found a way to extend the lifetime of blue PHOLEDs by a factor of 10, bringing them much closer to commercial use. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Displays  Forrest, Stephen  LEDs  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

These Energy-Saving, Batteryless Chips Could Soon Power The Internet Of Things

The story focuses on how the new Michigan/UVa start-up company, PsiKick, is going to help enable the Internet of Things thanks to their very low power processing, called subthreshold processing. Also mentioned is the Michigan startup, Ambiq Micro, which has also entered the low power revolution. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Internet of Things  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Technology Transfer  Wentzloff, David  

Theres Really No Delete Button on the Internet

In this interview on Michigan Radio, Prof. Kevin Fu talks about Internet privacy and the fact that boundaries don't really exist in the age of cloud computing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (national and personal safety)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Research finds No Large Scale Heartbleed Exploit Attempts Before Vulnerability Disclosure

Did the NSA or anyone else take advantage of the Heartbleed bug prior to its public disclosure? This Threat Post story describes research by Prof. J. Alex Halderman and others which indicates that traffic data collected on several large networks shows no exploit attempts in the months leading up to the public disclosure. The article has also been slashdotted here. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (national and personal safety)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Facets of Privacy Discussed at Inauguration Panel

At a symposium to mark the inauguration of President Mark S. Schlissel, leading privacy scholars from U-M and Carnegie Mellon University, including Prof. Kevin Fu, discussed the issues surrounding privacy, social media, and cloud computing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Security (national and personal safety)  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Jetpac: The Implications of the Google Acquisition

In this posting on Dell's Tech Page One site, Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja comments on how the totality of social media posts can, when analyzed on a massive scale, reveal deeply sensitive personal information. Google's recent acquisition of Jetpac wil allow the search engine company to expand its AI capabilities in directions that would potentially allow it to create such user profiles. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  

Tweet Analysis Paints More Accurate Employment Picture Than The US Government Release

As reported in International business Times, U-M researchers including Prof. Michael Cafarella and graduate student Dolan Antenucci have found a quicker and more accurate measure of unemployment in America -- through analysis of Twitter data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Cafarella, Michael  Lab-Software Systems  

Researchers Hack Into Michigans Traffic Lights

MIT Technology Review has covered work led by Prof. J. Alex Halderman, in which he and students including Branden Ghena have demonstrated security flaws in a common system of networked traffic signals. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Slashdot: Can Our Computers Continue To Get Smaller and More Powerful?

Prof. Igor Markov's article in this week's issue of the journal Nature, along with the ARS Technica article that provides commentary, have been slashdptted. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Markov, Igor  

Are processors pushing up against the limits of physics?

ARS Technica has provided a lengthy analysis and commentary on Prof. Igor Markov's article that appeared in the journal Nature regarding the limits of computing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Markov, Igor  

The Limits of Moores Law Limits

Following an interview with Prof. Igor Markov, EE Times asks: ...now that we are approaching the atomic scale, many see the handwriting on the wall: When you get down to one atom per memory cell, Moore's Law has to end -- or has it? [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Markov, Igor  

Court case: Voting via the Internet is a civil rights issue for disabled

The debate over whether Americans should be permitted to vote via the Internet has long pitted voting system manufacturers, who frame it to election officials as inevitable and modern, against cybersecurity experts including Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who has repeatedly demonstrated vulnerabilities in voting systems worldwide. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Low-Power Laser Could Speed CPUs

Prof. Bhattacharya's breakthrough room-temperature polariton laser enables commercialization of the technology. One potential application discussed by the author is to enable on-chip optical interconnects. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  Electronic devices  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Utah is correct to both be at the front of online voting, and cautiously study security

Prof. J. Alex Halderman is watching as the state of Utah convenes a committee to study how the Beehive State might proceed with online voting. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

A Batteryless Sensor Chip for the Internet of Things

MIT Technology Review described the chips being made by PsiKick, a company co-founded by Prof. David Wentzloff. These low-power chips are the key to the promise of the Internet of Things. Their chip design has been tested in a wearable EKG monitor that runs entirely on body heat. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Technology Transfer  Wearable electronics  Wentzloff, David  

US Researchers Develop Room Temperature Polariton Laser

Device could be future optical replacement for on-chip wires. Scientists from the University of Michigan (Prof. Bhattacharya) and Intel Corporation in the US have demonstrated what appears to be the first electrically powered, room-temperature polariton laser. The device, based on a GaN-based microcavity diode, could advance efforts to replace on-chip wire connections with lasers, leading to smaller and more powerful electronics, say the researchers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  Electronic devices  

Tailor-made surface swaps light polarization

A new approach to manipulating light using two-dimensional metamaterials called metasurfaces offers a compact alternative to traditional methods. The researchers believe the basic geometry of cascading patterned metallic sheets can provide the basis for cleverly designing and fabricating a broad range of optical devices, including symmetric circular polarizers, polarization rotators, and asymmetric linear polarizers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Grbic, Anthony  Guo, L. Jay  Metamaterials  

Cockroaches rule! And heres why

Cockroaches actually have much to teach in the realm of robust systems - something we want in our technology. The article references a recent video featuring Prof. Shai Revzen's work in applying cockroach lessons to robotics. [Full Story]

Semitransparent PV cells go designer

Prof. Jay Guo and his team have engineered what are believed to be the first semitransparent, colored photovoltaic cells. Broadening the use of solar power while maintaining aesthetic appeal for all kinds of environments, this technology could become energy-harvesting billboards on the sides of buildings, solar window shades in our homes and even stained glass, Guo said. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  Solar Cell Technology  

Hack the Vote: The Perils of the Online Ballot Box

In the Wall Street Journal opinion piece, the authors quote Prof. J. Alex Halderman on electronic voting, who says "With today's security technology, no country in the world is able to provide a secure Internet voting system." More that 30 US states and territories currently allow some form of internet voting. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Business Adapts to a New Style of Computer

"For more than a decade technologists have predicted and argued about the onslaught of these ubiquitous devices [Internet of Things]. 'There is lot of quibbling about what to call it, but theres little doubt that were seeing the inklings of a new class of computer,' says David Blaauw, who leads a lab at the University of Michigan that makes functioning computers no bigger than a typed letter o." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Internet of Things  

Silicon Valley to Get a Cellular Network, Just for Things

Prof. David Blaauw comments on What's Next - which in this article means the Internet of Things, and the need for a wireless network for "things" rather than person-to-person communication. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Internet of Things  

BBC: Is Estonia e-Voting Safe?

In this audio interview, Prof. J. Alex Halderman details some of the security risks that his research team has uncovered in the Estonian electronic voting system. Up to a quarter of the electorate will vote online. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Terahertz Detectors Go Handheld

"Today terahertz detectors are commonplace in airports, where you enter a glass-walled chamber while the detector swings around you, snooping under your clothes for weapons. Now researchers have found a way to downsize the detector portion of those machines into chip-sized devices." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  Norris, Theodore B.  Optics and Photonics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Schools adding computer coding to curriculum

Prof. Elliot Soloway comments on the trend toward integration of coding as an important aspect of one's education. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Interactive Systems  Soloway, Elliot  Technology for Education  

The Washington Post: How Russia could easily hack its neighbors elections

Research conducted by Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his collaborators has shown a number of security flaws in Estonia's Internet voting system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

PC World: Estonian electronic voting system vulnerable to attacks, researchers say

Research conducted by Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his collaborators has shown a number of security flaws in Estonia's Internet voting system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

The Guardian: Estonian e-voting shouldnt be used in European elections, say security experts

Research conducted by Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his collaborators has shown a number of security flaws in Estonia's Internet voting system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, and Lately, Coding

The spread of coding instruction, while still nascent, is "unprecedented theres never been a move this fast in education," according to Prof. Elliot Soloway. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Interactive Systems  Soloway, Elliot  Technology for Education  

Eye of the Tiger: U.S. Army Eyes Night Vision Contact Lenses

"Were talking featherweight futuristic night vision awesomeness here, Iron Man soldier suit style, without the hulking suit. They seem almost as cool as Googles blood glucose-level tracking contacts." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graphene  Sensors  

Wired: Its Crazy What Can Be Hacked Thanks to Heartbleed

PsiKicks batteryless sensors poised for coming Internet of Things

Infrared Sensor Could Lead to Night Vision Contact Lenses (with video)

New York Times: Study Finds No Evidence of Heartbleed Attacks Before the Bug Was Exposed

Heartbleed Software Snafu: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Heartbleed Hackers Steal Encryption Keys in Threat Test

Hacker From China Wastes Little Time in Exploiting Heartbleed

Researchers find thousands of potential targets for Heartbleed OpenSSL bug

CSE researchers have used ZMap, their Internet address scanning software, to perform comprehensive scans of the IPv4 address space and to identify servers still vulnerable to the Heartbleed exploit. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

Michigan Daily: Internet security flaw left University sites vulnerable

Vox: Take these 4 steps right now to protect yourself from the Heartbleed bug

In the wake of the Heartbleed OpenSSL bug, Vox interviews Research Prof. Michael Bailey who comments on steps you can take to better protect your information on the web. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Security and Privacy (Computing)  

The Heritage of Mead & Conway: What Has Remained the Same, What Has Changed, What Was Missed, and What Lies Ahead

This recent Point of View article in the Proceedings of the IEEE reflects upon the impact of the vision and ideas of Prof. Emerita Lynn Conway and her collaborator Carver Mead of Caltech, and the work the two did in ushering in the VLSI revolution. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Conway, Lynn  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

AAMI: Cyberthreats Loom with the End of Windows XP Support

In this Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation article, Prof. Kevin Fu comments on the security threats that healthcare facilities will face with the end of Windows XP support on April 8. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Software Systems  Medical Device Security  

Fu: FierceHealthIT - As Windows XPSecurity Updates Cease, Whats Next for Healthcare Providers?

Have New Cars Gone Haywire?

ECE Professor Jim Freudenberg comments on the increasing complexity of automobile electronics with Discovery News. Commenting on this, he said that the complexity of software in a vehicle is daunting, and added that the average Ford in 2010 had 10 million lines of code, more than the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Automotive industry  Freudenberg, James S.  

Cafarella - Washington Post: Twitter is surprisingly accurate at predicting unemployment

Cafarella: The Economist - Big Data - Separating tweet from chaff

Guo: Science World - Beautiful Energy

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  

Olson: The Wall Street Journal - Driverless Cars Are Data Guzzlers

Night-Vision Contact Lenses that use Infrared Technology

Stained Glass Windows that Double as Solar Panels

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  

Graphene Gives You Infrared Vision in a Contact Lens

Fu: Medical Device & Diagnostic Industry - Five MedTech Influencers You Should Know

Taking a step toward a machine that can think

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lu, Wei  

After two years, bipedal robot takes steps outside

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  

Halderman: The Baltimore Sun - Experts worry about election fraud threat

Halderman: Wired - Four Information Security Stories of 2013 You May Have Missed (ZMap)

Markov: Forbes/Quora: Are There Too Many Students Going Into Computer Science?

Markov: Huffington Post college blog/Quora - Why Do Professors Spend Their Precious Time in Teaching MOOCs When They Are Not Getting Paid for That?

Halderman: The Washington Post - News sites could protect your privacy with encryption. Heres why they probably wont.

MABEL the Robot - Video Friday

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  

Today In Dystopian War Robots That Will Harvest Us For Our Organs

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  

Jagadish: InformationWeek - Gates Foundation Big Data Grants Stress Open Data

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Jagadish: Chronicle of Philanthropy - 6 Projects That Make Data More Accessible...

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

No Big Deal, Just a Robot Walking Around Campus

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  

Pallab Bhattacharya Speaks at UC Davis

The College of Engineering at UC Davis presents a lecture by Pallab Bhattacharya at 4 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2013 in 1065 Kemper Hall on the university campus. Bhattacharyas presentation is titled Strong Coupling Phenomena, Polariton Lasers and Room Temperature Bose-Einstein Condensation. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  

Fu: New York Times - Of Fact, Fiction and Defibrillators

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

10 Coolest DARPA Projects

Halderman: Interview on Tana TV (Estonia) regarding e-voting in Estonia and Latvia

Forrest: MLive - Michigans $1.33B research enterprise

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  

Wellman: CNN Money - Make $377,000 trading Apple in one day

Halderman: Mashable - ZMap Scans the Entire Internet in Under 45 Minutes

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Ambiq Micro (Blaauw - Sylvester): Market Wired - Ambiq Micro Closes $10M Series B Funding Led by Austin Ventures

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Technology Transfer  

Lu: FOX Detroit - Image processing 1,000 times fast

DARPA Funds Neural Image Processor

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lu, Wei  

Halderman: The Chronicle of Higher Education - U. of Michigan Researchers Speed Up Internet Scans

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: NakedSecurity from Sophos - Welcome to Zmap, the one hour turnaround internet scanner

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: TechWeek Europe - Zmaps Fast Internet Scan Tool Could Spread Zero Days In Minutes

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: The Verge - Take a snapshot of the entire internet in just 44 minutes with ZMap scanner

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: Motherboard - Now You Can Scan the Entire Internet in Under an Hour

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: Threatpost - Scanning the Internet in 45 Minutes

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: The Register - New tool lets single server map entire internet in 45 minutes

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: The Washington Post: Heres what you find when you scan the entire Internet in an hour

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: Slashdot - Researchers Release Tool That Can Scan the Entire Internet In Under an Hour

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: The Washington Post: Heres how Iran censors the Internet

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Creating the Carl Lewis of robots: Researchers at Penn give latest project legs

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  

Fu: MIT Technology Review - Electric Therapy for Medical-Device Malware

Crossbar takes on DRAM and flash storage...

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lu, Wei  

Crossbar Enters Race to Change Memory Chips

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lu, Wei  

ReRAM Startup Bets on Silver

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lu, Wei  

Wellman: MSN Money - Every Day, Another Flash Crash

Shin: DesignNews - GapSense Allows Communication Between WiFi, Bluetooth, ZigBee Devices

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Laser can identify substances, could be military tool

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Islam, Mohammed  

from 2 to 2.5 microns at a 25 W output, 50 W coming this year

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Islam, Mohammed  

Fu: Scientific American - A New Cyber Concern: Hack Attacks on Medical Devices

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Wellman: Think Progress - High-Frequency Trading Actually Does More Harm Than Good

Sarabandi: Motherboard - This Gun Radar Could Make Concealed Carry Obselete

Wellman: Huffington Post - High-Frequency Trading Is Bad For Profits, Including Those Of High-Speed Traders: Study

Fu: The Economist - How vulnerable are medical devices to hackers?

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Wellman: Bloomberg - Sudden Stock Crashes Usually Caused by Human Error, SEC Says

Cafarella: Salon - Netflix, Facebook and the NSA: Theyre all in it together

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Wellman: TechCrunch - Trading Faster Than The Speed Of Reality

Halderman: Washington Post - NSA-proof encryption exists. Why doesnt anyone use it?

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Fu: The Wall Street Journal - Potential Cyberattacks on Implanted Medical Devices Draw Attention

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Fu: Washington Post: FDA, facing cybersecurity threats, tightens medical-device standards

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Penny-Sized Vacuum System Could Help Detect Chemical Weapons

1,000 times less energy needed for alternative polariton laser

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  

Dutta: NewScientist - Smart dust computers are no bigger than a snowflake

Dutta: Humans Invent - Smart dust: Computers as small as a grain of sand

Dutta: MIT Technology Review - Wanted for the Internet of Things: Ant-Sized Computers

Polariton Lasers Light Up at Low Power

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  

Sarabandi: Michigan Public Radio Podcast: Building Better Security Screening Systems

Carmon: Nature Photonics - View from... 2013 Photonics West: Solid Cooling

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Optics and Photonics  

Dutta: New Scientist - Smart dust computers are no bigger than a snowflake

Wenisch: Wired - The Real Reason ARM Will Menace Intel in the Data Center

Shin: PCWorld - Wireless networks may learn to live together by using energy pulses

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Najafi, Peterson: Kurzweil - Low-cost precise navigation without GPS

Tech Transfer, Accuri Cytometers, Arborlight: CBS News - UM Startups Amaze As Tech Tour Continues

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Technology Transfer  

Sarabandi: Slate - How New Military Technologies Can Help Prevent the Next Boston or Newtown

Najafi, Peterson: Wired - Darpas New Navigation Tool Is Smaller Than a Penny

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  GPS  Najafi, Khalil  

Najafi, Peterson: DARPA - Extreme Miniaturization

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  GPS  Najafi, Khalil  

Shin: EE Times - GapSense unclogs WiFi Channels

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Jarrahi: PhysOrg - Better than X-rays: A more powerful terahertz imaging system

Jarrahi: National Science Foundation - Better Than X-rays

Shin: redOrbit - GapSense To Help Competing Wireless Protocols Play Nicely Together

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Shin: R&D - New software could alleviate wireless traffic

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Shin: Engadget - University of Michigans GapSense may help WiFi harmonize with wireless neighbors

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Sarabandi: gizmag - Radar used to detect concealed weapons in public spaces

Sarabandi: Fox News - Could a military radar prevent further Newtown style tragedies?

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  

Halderman: National Council of State Legislatures - Cybersecurity for Online Voter Registration

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: Slate - The Chilling Effects of the DMCA

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

IEEE Spectrum: Better Eyes for Flying Robots

Sarabandi: Popular Science - Researcher Says Radar Tech Could Detect Guns at School

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  

Soloway: New York Times - Digitally Aided Education, Using the Students Own Electronic Gear

Better Eyes for Flying Robots

Dongsuk Jeon, a graduate student working with Zhengya Zhang and IEEE Fellows David Blaauw and Dennis Sylvester at the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor, outlined an approach to drastically lower the power of the very first stage of any vision systemthe feature extractor. That system uses an algorithm to draw out potentially important features like circles and squares from an overall image. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sylvester, Dennis  Zhang, Zhengya  

Fu: Healthcare Info Security - How to Improve Medical Device Security (audio interview)

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: The Christian Science Monitor - First-ever cyberattack on US election points to broad vulnerabilities

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: NBC - Cyberattack on Florida election is first known case in US, experts say

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Revzen: Discovery - Cockroaches teach robots to balance

Revzen: Popular Science - Watch: How Cockroaches Are Helping Scientists Design Better Robots

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Revzen, Shai  

Forrest: U-M research funding up, but sequestration threatens budget

Maryland's proposed online ballot system called vulnerable to cyberattack

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Papaefthymiou: Yahoo! Finance - GLOBALFOUNDRIES and Cyclos Semiconductor Partner to Develop High-Performance, Low-Power ARM Cortex-A15 Processors Usin

Adar: Popular Photograpy - PixelTone: A Voice Controlled Photo Editing App for iPad

Adar: Gizmodo - Adobe's Developing a Brilliant Photo Editing App You Can Just Talk To

Adar: NBC - Voice-controlled photo app PixelTone: Shades of "Blade Runner"

CPU, Heal Thyself

Prof. David Blaauw writes about his work on a fault-monitoring microprocessor design can save power or allow overclocking. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  

Fu: Canadian National Radio interview; story begins at 27:00

Bhattacharya: Ars Technica - Bose-Einstein condensate created at room temperature

Forrest: Science Magazine - Space Solar Cells With A Down-to-Earth Cost

Guo: Optics and Photonics - Subwavelength Grooves Reflect Consistent Colors

Guo: EE Times - Reflective display funnels light

Power and Energy Curriculum: Engineering TV - video with Heath Hofmann

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  

Hofmann: Engineering TV - Automotive Power Electronics

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  

Bertacco, Mahlke: Michigan Daily - What Will Tech Look Like in 2030?

Guo-Yoon: Popular Science - A Nanotube Lens Focuses Sound Waves Into and Invisible Sonic Scalpel

Guo-Yoon: IEEE Spectrum - Nanoparticle Coated Lens Converts Light into Sound for Precise Non-invasive Surgery

Guo-Yoon: Discover News - Lens Converts Light Into Sound

Soloway: THE Journal - Mobile That Works

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Interactive Systems  

Fu: The Security Ledger - Uncle Sam Wants to Stop Healthcare Fraud, But Smart Cards Are No Panacea

Fu: The Hill - GOP lawmaker calls for tougher fight against Medicare fraud

Savarese: MyScience.cc - Bourne pursuit: Improving computer tracking of human activity

Savarese: Communications of the ACM - Bourne Pursuit: Improving Computer Tracking of Human Activity

Halderman: The Verge - Feed the machine: America's stumble through a decade of electronic voting

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: CNN Money - Why you can't vote online yet

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: Tech News Daily - Election Security Risks, Potential Voting Failures Loom

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: NBCNews.com - New Jersey's email voting suffers major glitches, deadline extended to Friday

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: Bloomberg Businessweek - Security of N.J. E-Mail Voting After Storm Is Questioned

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: PC Mag - Online Voting: What It Means for the Presidential Election

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: MIT Technology Review - Why You Cant Vote Online Tuesday

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: TechHive - Electoral Tech: How E-Voting Has Evolved

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: The Economist - Paperless polling stations are unfashionable, but internet voting is on its way

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: MLive - Why can't we vote online yet? The answer sounds a lot like the University of Michigan fight song

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: Huffington Post - Electronic Voting Machines Still Widely Used Despite Security Concerns

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: Global Post - Digital Democracy: the joys and perils of voting for president via email

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: Washington Post - Marylands online voter registration files are vulnerable to attack, researchers say

Fu: MIT Technology Review - Computer Viruses Are Rampant on Medical Devices in Hospitals

Ku: U Record - Tech Transfer sets new record for agreements in fiscal year 2012

Halderman: KPCC NPR Take Two Show - Why Cant We Vote Online Yet? (includes audio)

Halderman: New York Times - Voter Registration Rolls in 2 States Are Called Vulnerable to Hackers

Forrest: AnnArbor.com - U-M head of research Stephen Forrest discusses budget and cars

Halderman: Bloomberg - E-Mail Votes Seen Raising Election Security Risk: BGOV Barometer

Grizzle: NSF - 2012 Popular Mechanics Breakthrough Awardees Announced

Grizzle: PhysOrg - 2012 Popular Mechanics Breakthrough awardees announced

Grizzle: Popular Mechanics - 10 World-Changing Innovators

Halderman: Time - MOOC Brigade: Who Is Taking Massive Open Online Courses, And Why?

Chesney: EDGE - Kinect student project helping children with autism

Grizzle: Discovery News - Run! Top 5 Fastest Robots to the Rescue

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  

Zhong: Science - Flexible and Fast

Zhong: Nanotechweb - Digital modulator goes transparent

Ku: PhysOrg - Nano-origami project combines art and engineering to further technology

Halderman: 3sat - Freiheit frs Internet (video, in German)

MEMStim, startup company: CoE Feature Story

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  

Angelique Johnson (PhE EE 11) and MEMStim: AnnArbor.com - Innovation Corps: U-M spinoffs among 27 teams exploring ways to turn research into profit

Ku: CBS Detroit - Nano-Origami Project Combines Art, Engineering

Halderman: Wall Street Journal - Will the Next Election Be Hacked?

Jay Guo quoted in Scientific American

Papaefthymiou: IEEE Spectrum - Power-Saving Clock Scheme in New PCs

Bailey: Network World - Launch event drives IPv6 traffic to all-time high

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Papaefthymiou: BBC News - AMD unveils Trinity chipsets to challenge Ivy Bridge

Wellman: IEEE Spectrum - The Microsecond Market

Mudge: The Economist - Oh, thats near enough

Chesney: Detroit Free Press - Video games help autistic students in classrooms

Chesney: USA Today - Video games help autistic students in classrooms

Strauss and Gilbert: MIT Technology Review - A Faster Fourier Transform

Strauss and Gilbert: IEEE Spectrum - A Faster Fast Fourier Transform

Soloway: Engine Yard: 10 Really Awesome Computer Science Professors

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Interactive Systems  

Mao: Engadget - Exploit uses firewalls to hijack smartphones, turns friends into foes

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Halderman: Bangkok Post - Internet voting still faces hurdles in US

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Mao: CIO Today - Flaw Found in Common Network Security Technology

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Mao: Net India 123 - Firewalls can help hackers break into Facebook, Twitter

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Mao: Silicon India News - Firewalls Help Hackers Break Into Facebook, Twitter

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Mao: International Business Times - Firewall Middleboxes Help Internet Hackers: Study

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Mao: Deccan Herald - Firewalls can help hackers break into Facebook, Twitter

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Laird: The Cutting Edge - Sid Meier, Gaming Genius, Shares his Magic with Students

Mao: Tech 2 - Study shows firewalls used to hack into FB, Twitter accounts

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  

Mao: ARS Technica - Smartphone hijacking vulnerability affects AT&T, 47 other carriers

[Full Story]

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England: U Record - Tony England named interim dean of CECS at UM-Dearborn

WIMS - Gianchandani: ScienceDaily - Smart Gas Sensors For Better Chemical Detection

Forrest: Technology Review - Sharp Transistors Could Enable Cheap, Retina-Style Displays

Baveja: Wired - Artificial Intelligence Could Be on Brink of Passing Turing Test

Chesney: Daily Adventures - Gaming for the Greater Good: technology really enables the possibilities to help people

Forrest: Nature - Japan Gambles on Displays

Savarese: LidarNews Magazine - D4AR - 4 Dimensional Augmented Reality

Gianchandani and WIMS2: EPM Magazine - Micro and High Precision Technology Event Declared Successful by RNCG

Wei_Lu: Nature Communications - Observation of conducting filament growth in nanoscale resistive memories

Gianchandani and WIMS2: Nanotechnology Now - Micro and High Precision Technology Event declared a Success

Lafortune: Concentrate - U-M prof plays key role in $10M computer programming project

Soloway: NPR - Amidst a Mobile Revolution in Schools, Will Old Teaching Tactics Work?

Lafortune: WWJ-TV - UM Researcher Involved In $10M Project To Advance Computer Programming

Revzen: CNN - Holy &%$! inventions

Lu: CBS Detroit - UMs First Startup Investment Goes To Semiconductor Memory Firm

Sarabandi: EE Times - BAE Systems wins $34M DARPA contract

Halderman: Smarter Technology - Smarter Voting? Not This Year

[Full Story]

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Yoon: Saturday Evening Post - Watch Me Walk

Halderman: Slashdot (video) - Prof. J. Alex Halderman Tells Us Why Internet-Based Voting Is a Bad Idea

[Full Story]

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Halderman: TechDirt - The Details On How To Elect Futuramas Bender To Whatever Election Is Using Online Voting

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Halderman: Washington Post - D.C. Vote-Hackers Publish Their Vote-Hacking Exploits

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Halderman: Fox News (includes video) - Electronic Election Fail

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Halderman: Technorati - Why Internet Based Voting is Unfixably Broken

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Halderman: Marketplace Tech: Internet voting way too risky, say experts

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Halderman: Gizmodo - Hacked DC School Board E-Voting Elects Bender President

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Halderman: Slashdot - In Theory And Practice, Why Internet-Based Voting Is a Bad Idea

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Halderman: The Register - Election hacked, drunken robot elected to school board

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Halderman: Slashdot - Voting System Test Hack Elects Futuramas Bender To School Board

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Wenisch: TechCrunch - Researchers Propose Computational Sprinting To Speed Up Chips By 1000% But Only For A Second

Wenisch: PhysOrg - Computational sprinting pushes smartphones till theyre tired

Wenisch: Scientific American - Could Computational Sprinting Speed Up Smart Phones without Burning Them Out?

Wenisch: R&D - Researchers help rethink smartphone design with computational sprinting

Wenisch: The Register - Researchers propose overclock scheme for mobiles

Forrest-Grbic: Advanced Materials - Electrically Small Antennas

Evigia (startup): Frost & Sullivan Lauds Evigia for its Extensive Line of RFID-Sensing Products

Papaefthymiou: ExtremeTech - AMD to use resonant clock mesh to push Trinity above 4GHz

Papaefthymiou: Electronista - AMD Piledriver chips to use resonant clock mesh, top 4GHz

Papaefthymiou: TechSpot - AMDs Piledriver-based chips to feature energy-recycling tech

Papaefthymiou: The Inquirer - AMDs Piledriver chips will use a resonant clock mesh

Papaefthymiou: EE Times - AMD, not ARM, first to use startups low-power clock IP

Halderman: BoingBoing - Prime Suspect, or Random Acts of Keyness

Halderman: ARS Technica - Crypto shocker: four of every 1,000 public keys provide no security

Halderman: ThreatPost - Weak RSA Keys Plague Embedded Devices, But Experts Caution Against Panic

Halderman: Slashdot - Factorable Keys: Twice As Many, But Half As Bad

Forrest-Grbic: Nature - Printing tiny coiled antennas

Fessler: Advance for Imaging and Radiation Oncology - New Technology Allows for CT Scans...

Forrest, Grbic: BioPortfolio - Direct Transfer Patterning of Electrically Small Antennas onto Three-Dimensionally Contoured Substrates

Fessler: Michigan Daily - New CT technology decreases radiation

MichiganProbe-Wise: Michigan Today - An oboe for the brain

Gilbert, Strauss: MIT News - The Faster-than-Fourier Transform

Essl, Wakefield: ASEE Prism - Heavy Metal: Bronze bells and songwriting software inspire a merger of engineering and music

Lu: BioPortfolio - A Functional Hybrid Memristor Crossbar-Array/CMOS System

Blaauw-Sylvester-Wise: EE Web Pulse - Millimeter Scale Energy Harvesting Based Sensors

Guo: Paint & Coatings Industry - The Skys the Limit with Nanotechnology

Flynn, Kipke, Lee: EDN Asia - Medical sensors in biomedical electronics: The brain, heart and lungs

Najafi: Australian Broadcasting Corp (Radio interview RE cyborg bugs)

Najafi-Aktakka: NTVMSNBC (Turkey) - Bcekler depremzedeleri kurtaracak

Najafi: Korean News Service (Daum) - (RE the Cyborg bugs)

Guo: EngineerLive - Coloured solar cells could make display screens more efficient

Blaauw-Sylvester: EE Times 20 hot technologies for 2012

Guo: Popular Science - Carbon Nanotube Stealth Paint Could Make Any Object Ultra-Black

Guo: Technology Review - Nano Paint Could Make Airplanes Invisible to Radar

Jarrahi-Carmon: Laser Focus World - Whispering-gallery resonator generates CW fourth-harmonic UV light

Jarrahi-Carmon: Futurity - Ultraviolet lasers get smarter

Najafi-Aktakka: CNET - Could cyborg insects act as first responders?

Najafi-Aktakka: Futurity - Cyborg bugs as first responders

Najafi-Aktakka: Popular Science - Cyborg Insects Could Be First Responders in Rescue Situations

Guo: Innovation News Daily - New Material Makes Objects Appear Invisible

Guo: Science - ScienceShot: How to Make a Tank Disappear

Guo: BBC News - Carbon nanotube space camouflage coating invented

Revzen: Wired - Video: Robot Builds Other Robots From Foam

Revzen: IEEE Spectrum - Watch a Robot Build Other Robots out of Spray Foam

[Full Story]

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Revzen: New Scientist - Robot builds its own body from sprayable foam

mm-scale computing: EE Web - Millimeter Scale Energy Harvesting Based Sensors

Guo: The Cutting Edge - Colored Solar Cells Boost E-Reader Efficiency and Create Energy-Harvesting Light Displays

Guo: Solar Novus Today - Solar Energy Harvesting of Waste Heat from Displays

Guo: Chem Eruope.com - Colored solar cells could make display screens more efficient

Guo: Laser Focus World - Grating-based pixel-color filters convert wasted LCD light to electricity

Guo: Plastic Electronics - Photovoltaic colour filters could enhance display efficiency

Guo: CBS Detroit.com - Colored Solar Cells Could Make Display Screens More Efficient

Guo: MIT Technology Review - Energy-Harvesting Displays

Syed: Scientist Live - An SOS From a Damaged Heart

Ambiq Micro: U-M Press Release - U-M licenses a record number of inventions

Syed: MedPageToday - ECG Noise Predicts Death After MI

Syed: Ivanhoe - SOS From A Damaged Heart

Shin: EE Times - Subconscious mode for Smartphones Could Extend Battery Life by Over 50 Percent

Rand: AOL Energy - Solar Discovery Shakes Century-Old Science

Syed: Wall Street Journal Tech Europe- Data Mining Could Spot Heart Attack Risks

Syed: Science Daily - Saving Heart Attack Victims With Computer Science

Syed: WBUR NPR - Computer-Derived Markers Help Predict Risk Of Heart-Attack Death

Syed: Wired - Datamining Could Predict Heart Attack Risk

Syed: CBS Detroit - UM Finds New SOS From Badly Damaged Hearts

Syed: SmartPlanet - New Method Could Save Tens of Thousands of Heart Attack Victims

Syed: The Times of India - Now, Smarter ECG Shoots Off an SOS to Docs

Syed: Kurzweil AI - Computational Biomarkers Can Identify At-Risk Heart Attack Victims

Syed: Cardiology Today - Computationally Generated Biomarkers Predicted CV Deaths

Shin: SmartPlanet - Extending Smart Phone Battery Life by More Than 50 Percent

Shin: Science Daily - Smartphone Battery Life Could Dramatically Improve With New Invention

Shin: Cnet News - Subconscious Mode Extends Handset Battery Life

Grizzle: Live Science - Meet MABEL

LNF E-Beam Lithography System: Micro Manufacturing - E-Beam Lithography System with Exclusive Capability: Another Jewel among the Leading-Edge Equipme

Grizzle: IEEE Spectrum - Video Tuesday: BigDog, MABEL, and Quadrotors Landing on Quadrotors

Guo: ZeitNews (Energy) - Energy-Harvesting Displays

Najafi-Aktakka: Wall Street Journal - Giant Nuclear Mutant Cyborg Insects of Doom

Najafi-Aktakka: IEEE Spectrum - Micro Energy Harvesters Will Make Cyborg Insects Unstoppable

Najafi-Aktakka: Physorg.com - Cyborg insects generate power for their own neural control

Najafi-Aktakka: Next Big Future - Mechanical Energy Scavenging from Flying Insects

Islam: Concentrate - U-M researchers develop high-tech laser for acne treatment, body fat remova

Mao: MIT Technology Review - How Carriers Hamstring Your Smart Phone

Grizzle and MABEL on Fox2News: U of Ms MABEL the Robot Shows Off Her Moves

Islam: ABC Action News - New Lasers May Treat Acne

Hero: The Wall Street Journal - Wide Gap Found In Immune Responses Of People Exposed To The Flu

Hero: MSNBC - Why some people dont get the flu

Hero: Science News - Genes may explain who gets sick from flu

Grizzle: CBS News - Meet Mabel: The robot that does a 9-minute mile

Grizzle: Popular Science - Mabel the Robot Sets Speed Record For Bipedal Running

Grizzle: IEEE Spectrum - MABEL Bipedal Robot is Fast Enough to Run You Down

Guo: Technology Review - Energy-Harvesting Displays

Connor Field: Ars Technica - How one undergrad built the largest solar farm in Michigan

Halderman: NPR - A Way Around Internet Censorship? (includes audio)

Wenisch: WEMU Issues of the Environment - Interview on Data Centers (audio)

Carmon: Nature Communications - Stimulated optomechanical excitation of surface acoustic waves in a microdevice

[Full Story]

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Grbic-Forrest: MSNBC - Mass Production Ahead for Smallest Possible Wi-Fi Antenna

[Full Story]

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Grbic-Forrest: Smartplant - Tiny, powerful antennas could transform mobile devices

[Full Story]

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Halderman: ARS Technica - Deep packet inspection used to stop censorship in new Telex scheme

Yoon: Gizmag - Implant could wirelessly relay brain signals to paralyzed limbs

Rand: Green Tech World - University of Michigan Researchers Create Solar Power without Solar Cells

[Full Story]

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Halderman: ZDNet - Telex System Avoids Censorship, Say Researchers

Halderman: BBC News - Telex to Help Defeat Web Censors

Halderman: Threat Post - Researchers Develop End-to-Middle Proxy System to Evade Censorship

Halderman: NewScientist - Anticensorship Software to Help Rebels Get the Word Out

Halderman: Slashdot - Researchers Debut Proxy-Less Anonymity Service

Grbic-Forrest: Innovation News Daily - Mass Production Ahead for Smallest Possible Wi-Fi Antenna

Grbic-Forrest: WWJ-CBS Detroit - UM: New Method To Produce Tiny Antennas Could Improve Wireless Electronics

Grbic-Forrest: Mega Tech News - Radical Antenna Design May Shrink Future Wireless Gizmos

Grbic-Forrest: Futurity - Antenna shrinks. Phone soon to follow?

Grbic-Forrest: R&D Magazine - Using imprint processing to mass-produce tiny antennas could improve wireless electronics

Yoon: Discovery - Brain Implant Helps Control Prosthetic Limbs By Thought

Forrest: Jerusalem Post - Useable solar technology will be ready in about 5 years

Yoon: MIT Technology Review - Could This Brain Implant Revive Paralyzed Limbs?

Yoon: Nano Patents and Innovations - Non-invasive brain implant could someday translate thoughts into movement

Yoon: ubergizmo - BioBolt relays information to paralyzed limb from brain down the road

Yoon: Examiner - BioBolt Hope for the paraplegic and more?

Yoon: Psychology Today - BioBolt: The Next Generation of Brain-Machine Interfaces

Yoon: WWJ - UM Brain Implant Could Turn Thoughts Into Movement

Najafi-Aktakka: PhysOrg - Most powerful millimeter-scale energy harvester generates electricity from vibrations

Najafi-Aktakka: Next Big Future - Piezoelectric MEMS boosts vibration harvester by ten times

Najafi-Aktakka: EE Times - Piezoelectric MEMS boosts vibration harvester

Halderman: New York Times - Holding Companies Accountable for Privacy Breaches

Soloway: eSchool News - Mobile Learning: Not Just Laptops Any More

Soloway: THE Journal - Will Smart Phones Eliminate the Digital Divide?

Rand: Forbes - Solar Power Without Solar Cells?

Rand: Wired.co.uk - Lights magnetic field could make solar power without solar cells

Rand: Christian Science Monitor - Solar power: breakthrough could herald big drop in costs

Ringenberg: Educause Quarterly - Creating a Mobile Community of App Developers

Najafi-Wise: Ann Arbor.com - U-M engineers honored for pioneering efforts, work with high-tech start-ups

Winful: RTI Int - RTI International to Strengthen Liberian Workforce Through New Project in Higher Education

[Full Story]

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Galvanauskas: Crains Detroit Business - Arbor Photonics seeks spinoff success with more powerful lasers

[Full Story]

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Millimeter-scale computing: Fox News-World's Smallest Computer Created

Millimeter-scale computing: MSNBC-World's smallest computer watches you - from within

Millimeter-scale computing: Computerworld-Researchers create computer that fits on a pen tip

Millimeter-scale computing: EE Times-Millimeter-scale all-in-one computers debut

Olson: Catalyst (ABC TV) - Robot Wars

Olson: Catalyst blog - Future of Warfare

Millimeter computing: Discover-World's Teeniest, Tiniest Computer Fits on the 'N' of a Penny

Laird: USA Today - Watson Plays Jeopardy Well, But What Else Can It Do?

Laird: USA Today - Jeopary Champs Take on IBMs Watson

Dutta: Slashdot - HiJacking the iPhones Headset Port

Soloway: New York Times - Math That Moves: Schools Embrace the iPad

WIMS: Pentagon Brief - Chip Sized Sensor to Detect Dangerous Chemicals

Soloway: Mlive.com - Smart phones changing work, play and school

Laird: The Washington Post - Artificial intelligence makes some progress, but robots still cant match humans

Halderman: Lecture on EVMs creates chaos in Gandhinagar, rescheduled

Halderman: AnnArbor.com - U-M Professor threatened with deportation by Indian officials, kept from presenting controversial study

Nees-Mourou: PhysOrg - Theoretical physics breakthrough: Generating matter and antimatter from the vacuum

Nees-Mourou: Popular Science - Making Something From Nothing: Researchers Find That Matter Can Be Conjured from a Vacuum

[Full Story]

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Olson: Robotics Online - U-M Robot Team Wins International Competition and $750,000

Olson: ZDNet Australia - US Defeats Australia in Robot Comp

Olson: AnnArbor.com - Robots Built By University of Michigan Students Win $750,000 Grant

Olson: Detroit Free Press - U-M Team Wins Global Robotics Prize

Olson: PRWeb - Hail to the Victors! Team Michigan Wins Inaugural Worldwide Robotics Competition in Australia

Sylvester-Blaauw: PRWeb - Ambiq Micro Secures $2.4M Investment

Sylvester-Blaauw: GreenTech - Ambiq Micro Closes $2.4 Million Seed Round For Efficient Micro-controllers

Norris: Nature Photonics - Ultrafast Rabi flopping and coherent pulse propagation in a quantum cascade laser

[Full Story]

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Islam: Scientific American - Laser Tag

[Full Story]

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Islam: Scientific American - Lased and Confused: Off-the-Shelf Infrared Lasers Could Ward Off Missile Attacks on Military Helicopters

[Full Story]

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Islam: Wired - Army Turns to Lasers for Copter Defense

[Full Story]

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Fessler: MyScience - Grant could enable higher definition CT scans at lower radiation doses

[Full Story]

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Guo: Nature Communications - Plasmonic nanoresonators for high-resolution colour filtering and spectral imaging

Guo: Technology Review - A Simple Filter Could Make LCDs More Efficient

Grizzle: The Lucy Ann Lance Show - MABEL The Walking Robot

Grizzle: MSN - Ford Increases Investment in University Research; More Than $60 Million Awarded Over Last 20 Years

[Full Story]

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Grizzle: The Auto Channel - Ford Increases Investment in University Research; More Than $60 Million Awarded Over Last 20 Years

[Full Story]

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Quantum Signal (EECS startup): Ann Arbor.com-Quantum Signal plans to add 47 jobs after acquisition of Saline's former Union School building

Blaauw,Sylvester: New York Times - Ambiq Micro Wins Another Business Competition

Blaauw-Sylvester: Crains Detroit Business - UM spinoff Ambiq Micro Inc. wins business plan competition

Blaauw,Sylvester,Hanson: Ann Arbor.com - U-M microcontroller spinoff Ambiq Micro wins

Sylvester-Blaauw-Hanson: Market Watch - DFJ and Cisco Announce Ambiq Micro as Winner of Global Business Plan Competition

Moghaddam: Physorg - Soil moisture study aims for climate change insights

[Full Story]

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Guo: Technology Review - A Simpler Route to Plastic Solar Cells

Zhong: URecord - U-M, Chinese university provide $1.2M for renewable energy, biomedical technology projects

Forrest: Nature Photonics-Room-temperature polariton lasing

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Grizzle: AP - U-M robot Mabel clears stacked wood, may jog soon

[Full Story]

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Grizzle: Detroit Free Press - U-M robot breaks leg

[Full Story]

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WIMS-CUOS: WWJ 950 - Four U-M Projects Named to NSF 'Sensational 60' List

[Full Story]

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WIMS-Lasik: URecord - U-M projects named to NSF Sensational 60 list

Grizzle: URecord - Video shows walking robot navigating bumpy ground

[Full Story]

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Grizzle: Robotics Tech Center - MABEL: A Bipedal Robot Walks Naturally With no Camera

[Full Story]

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Grizzle: semageek - Mabel, le robot bipde qui se casse la jambe

[Full Story]

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Grizzle: engadget - U-M's MABEL robot hits a stride, breaks a leg

[Full Story]

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Carmon: Science - Putting Light's Touch to Work as Optics Meets Mechanics

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Grizzle: Fast Company - Sightless Mabel's Fancy Footwork a Giant Leap for Robotkind

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Grizzle: BotJunkie - MABEL Walks on Uneven Surfaces, Breaks Ankle

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Halderman: BBC News - US Scientists Hack India Electronic Voting Machines

Halderman: Times of India - Tamper-Proof? Scientists Show EVMs Can Be Hacked

Halderman: Slashdot - Researchers Demo Hardware Attacks Against Indias...

WIMS: GLITR - UM Center Celebrates 10 Years of Developing Wireless Devices

Kaplan: APS Observer - This Side of Paradise; Discovering Why the Human Mind...

Forrest: Ann Arbor.com - Investment in education would reverse U.S. manufacturing contraction

Flinn and Noble: Popular Mechanics - Cloud Computing for Commuters

Kieras: Ann Arbor Observer - Hang Up and Drive! (PDF)

Bertacco and Austin: BBC News - Web Security Attack Makes Silicon Chips More Reliable

Nadakuditi-New Scientist: Enter the matrix: the deep law that shapes our reality

[Full Story]

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Radev: NALCO Press Release - Say What? High School Linguists Break the Code

Essl: BlogTalkRadio - Radio Interview on Cell Phones and Learning

Essl: WOBC News - Radio Interview on Michigan Mobile Phone Ensemble

Markov: EE Times - IBM Benchmarks Prod Microprocessor Designers

Najafi-Galchev: AP Story in Battle Creek Enquirer - U-M looks to harvest energy

Soloway: eSchool News - Education Reformers Tout Value of Handheld Technologies (pdf)

Najafi-Galchev: Popular Science: Tiny Mini-Generators Scavenge Energy From Ambient, Random Vibrations

Najafi-Galchev: Physorg: Mini generators make energy from random ambient vibrations

Scott Hanson - Crain's Detroit: Ambiq Micro wins UM student business plan competition

Wei Lu: Europe Sun: Missing link of electronics could make brain-like computers

Wei Lu: Physorg: Brain-Like Computer Closer to Realization

Wei Lu: Chemistry World: Silver sputtered nano chips mimic brain synapse

Noble and Flinn: Technology Review - Creating Apps Just for Cars

Wei Lu: New Scientist: Electronics 'missing link' brings neural computing closer

Bertacco and Austin: UPI.com - Study Finds Weakness in Security System

Bertacco and Austin: The Register - Severe OpenSSL Vuln Busts Public Key Crypto

Bertacco and Austin: Slashdot - Researchers Find Way to Zap RSA Algorithm

Adar: Technology Review - Putting the Web in a Spreadsheet

Ambiq-Enertia: New York Times - Michigan Business Challenge

Clean Energy Prize: PR Newswire

Clean Energy Prize: Renewable Energy Sources

Sylvester and Blaauw-MSNBC: Tiny solar-powered sensor runs almost forever

Sylvester and Blaauw-Popular Science: Miniature Sensor Perpetually Charges Self Using Environmental Energy

Kushner-New York Times: Hospital-Clean Hands, Without All the Scrubbing

[Full Story]

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Hofmann-New York Times: Electric Motors, Made to Order

[Full Story]

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Guo: Nature Photonics - Dynamic nanoscribing

Lafortune and Mahlke: IEEE Computer - Eliminating Concurrency Bugs with Control Engineering (pdf)

Syed: MIT Technology Review - Tests May Reveal Hidden Predictors of Heart Disease

Soloway: District Administration - Mobile Devices in the Classroom

Essl: Michigan Radio - The Sound of (iPhone) Music

Essl: BBC - iPhone Orchestra Ready for Debut

Essl: Detroit Free Press - U-M Students Merge Music with iPhone Technology

Lynch and WIMS: Innovative structure sensors: in Construction Advisory Group

Forrest: Dear of the Year: U-M's North Campus Research Complex: AnnArbor.com

Lynch and WIMS: New monitoring systems should make smar bridges..., in Miller-McCune

Grizzle: Ford, U-M work on accelerating hybrid development: Metromode

Freudenberg and Cook: Embedded Control Systems at U-M: MathWorks

Dick and Mao: Smartphone app article in Great Lakes IT Report

Dick and Mao: Smartphone app article in PhysOrg

Noble - IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing: Juggler: Virtual Networks for Fun and Profit

LNF: World-class university facilities can spark creativity (Ann Arbor.com)

WeiLu: Understanding Mechanical Properties Of Silicon Nanowires, Article Cited in RedOrbit

Radev - Computing Research News: Expanding the Pipeline... (pdf)

Soloway - Concentrate: Here, There, Then Back Again

Chen - IEEE Computer: The OS Faces a Brave New World (pdf)

UM Solar Car Team Third In World

Grizzle in Metromode: Ford, U-M work on accelerating hybrid development

[Full Story]

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Noble, Flinn - Crains Detroit Business: U-M Students to Experiment with Future Ford Sync Applications

Grizzle - Motor Trend: Ford Partners with U of Michigan for Development on Customizable Hybrid Settings

Grizzle - Reuters: Ford, U of M Explore New Ways To Speed Development of Future Hybrid Vehicles

Forrest: Big Energy Funding for Tiny Technology (Nanotechnology)

Chesney - Michigan Engineer: Faculty, Teaching By Example

[Full Story]

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Halderman - Slashdot: Making Data Unvanish

Halderman - Freedom to Tinker: Breaking Vanish: A Story of Security Research...

Oberheide - Slashdot: Dam Burst Tool Disables China's Green Dam

Oberheide - ZDNet: Hacker Ships Tool to Circumvent China's Green Dam

Soloway - Tech & Learning: Cell Phones Welcome Here

Steel: Michigan scientists working on super-fast, secure computing

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Soloway - Concentrate: Ann Arbors Got Apps

Soloway - Metromode: Got Apps?

Forrest: On the Acquisition of 173 acre ex-Pfizer Research site

Grbic: Winning Strategies: Advice from PECASE Winners

[Full Story]

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David Blaauw - IEEE Spectrum: CPU, Heal Thyself

Alex Halderman - PC World: Android Security Chief: Mobile-Phone Attacks Coming

Ian Hiskens: Part of U-M's $2.5M grant for education toward a greener auto industry

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Stephen Forrest: Dingell, Forrest promote engineering research

Alex Halderman - Science Daily: Computer Scientists Take Over Electronic Voting Machine with New Programming Technique

Alex Halderman - Slashdot: Voting Machine Attacks Proven To Be Practical

Valeria Bertacco - IEEE Spectrum: Crowdsourcing the Complexities of Electronic Design Automation

Valeria Bertacco - Slashdot: Making a Game of Hardware Design

Valeria Bertacco - Science Daily: Game Utilizes Human Intuition to Help Computers Solve Complex Problems

Valeria Bertacco - Boing Boing: Game Uses Fun as Incentive to Solve Hard Chip Design Prolems

Martha Pollack - The Chronicle: Top Computer Scientists Met to Discuss Dangers

Martha Pollack - S. California Public Radio: AI Explosion: Could Robots Take Over?

Martha Pollack - Fox News: Will Robots Soon Be Able to Wage War Against Humans?

Elliot Soloway - USA Today: Cellphones teach phonics, animation and more...

Grbic: News of White House Award in Ann Arbor News

[Full Story]

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England: Scientists split on further moon missions

[Full Story]

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Hiskens: DOE Announces Nearly $14 Million to go to 28 New Wind Energy Projects

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Lada Adamic - US News: Second Life Data Offers Window into How Trends Spread

Grbic: PECASE Funds Photonics Work

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Elliot Soloway - Teacher Magazine: How About a Little Googling, Class?

Elliot Soloway - Digital Directions: Making the Case for Mobile Computing

Gilchrist: Near-lightspeed nano spacecraft might be close

Lynch and WIMS Colleagues: Smart Bridges Harness Technology to Stay Safe

Tom Wenisch - Great Lakes IT Report: Merit Member Conference Covers Cool Learning Technology

Alex Halderman - PC Magazine: Chinas Filtering Software Contains Pirated Code

Alex Halderman - New York Times: Experts Say Chinese Filter Would Make PCs Vulnerable

John Holland - SIGEVOlution newsletter: An Interview with John H. Holland

Alex Halderman - Wall Street Journal: Political Cues in China Web Filter

Tom Wenisch - Processor: Optimizing the Sleep Cycle

Alex Halderman - Yahoo! Games: Could Videogame Anti-Piracy Protection Invite Hackers into Your PC?

David Chesney - Livingston Daily: Students Get Technology Preview

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Hiskens: First Plug-In EV Conference Coming to Detroit

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Elliot Soloway - Michigan Business Review: GoKnow software moves learning to cell phones

ISPD Contest (Dongjin Lee; Igor Markov) covered in EE Times

Wei Lu's Memristor Chip in Next Big Future

Alex Halderman, quoted in PC Wold: Cheap scanners can fingerprint paper

Dr. Jacobs, co-founder of Qualcomm, talks about the future of cell phones

[Full Story]

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Elliot Soloway, quoted in The Dallas Morning News: Kellers Trinity Meadows students use cellphones as classroom computer

Elliot Soloway, quoted in eSchool News: Conference explores benefits of mobile learning

David Chesney, featured in ASEE Prism magazine and e-newsletter: Story Time

Wei Lu: Nature Materials, March 2008, Crossbar memories

Prof. Forrest Offers Podcast about U-M Energy Research and Michigan

[WIMS Center] Smart Roads. Smart Bridges. Smart Grids. 2/17/09 Wall Street Journal

HERCULES Petawatt Laser - Video Interview with Dr. Yanovsky

Watch Dr. Yanovsky in an interview appearing on Engineering TV: "Engineering TV visited The Center for Ultrafast Optical Science at the University of Michigan to take a closer look at HERCULES, a high-field petawatt class laser. The beam measures 20 billion trillion watts per square centimeter, contains 300 terawatts of power (300 times the capacity of the entire U.S. electricity grid), and is capable of producing this intense beam once every 10 seconds. Applications include optical communications at the terabit level, studies involving the behavior of electrons in quantum structures, and biomedical fields such as eye surgery , subcellular "nanomachining", and in vivo sensing (for example in vivo cytometry of circulating cancer cells). The National Science Foundation through the Physics Frontier Center FOCUS supports the development and construction of this laser. For more information, go to: Center for Ultrafast Optical Science. [Full Story]

Michael Wellman, quoted in ComputerWorld: A.I. comes of age

Atul Prakash, quoted in MSN Money: How dangerous is online banking?

Satinder Baveja, quoted in The Independent: Rise of the machines, end of the humans?

Larry Page: Google co-founder to speak at U-M Commencement

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Related Topics:  Alumni  

Elliot Soloway featured in Tech & Learning Magazine: The Future is in Your Hand

Elliot Soloway & Cathleen Norris, BusinessWeek Viewpoint: Get Cell Phones into Schools

Elliot Soloway & Cathleen Norris, District Admin: The Impending Mobile Mega-Disruption

Elliot Soloway, quoted in EDTECH: Coming Up Big

Blaauw and Sylvester's Technology in Technology Review's Year in Computing

Quantum computing breakthrough (Duncan Steel)

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Related Topics:  Lab-Optics and Photonics  

Valeria Bertacco, quoted in NASA Tech Briefs: Computer Guardians

Valeria Bertacco, quoted in Technology Review: Ensuring Chip Stability

Jay Guo's work in Nanoimprint Lithography

Valeria Bertacco, quoted in PC Advisor: Semantic guardian could spell end of chip bugs

Duncan Steel: Fast quantum computer bit is created

Steve Forrest: More Efficient OLED Lighting

Blaauw and Sylvester: Picowatt chip sets low-power record

Featured Article: Consumer Electronics Meets Distributed Storage

CSE graduate student Daniel Peek and Prof. Jason Flinn, Morris Wellman Faculty Development Assistant Professor, described their Blue File System (BlueFS) project in a recent article of the IEEE Computer Magazine (Feb 2007). Responding to the complexity involved in trying to share and update information between our digital cameras, iPods, cell phones, and laptop computers, Flinn and Peek are working to simplify personal digital content management.
[ Article available on IEEExplore]
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Related Topics:  Flinn, Jason  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Software Systems