Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Research News

Cancer stem cells: new method analyzes 10,000 cells at once

A new device for studying tumor cells can trap 10,000 individual cells in a single chip. The technique, developed by Prof. Euisik Yoon's group, could one day help screen potential cancer treatments based on an individual patients tumor and help researchers better understand so-called cancer stem cells. It also shed light on a controversy: are large cells or small cells more likely to be cancer stem cells? [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cancer  Health  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  MEMS and Microsystems  Yoon, Euisik  

How big data and algorithms are slashing the cost of fixing Flints water crisis

Michigan researchers, including the Michigan Data Science student team, are using new algorithmic and statistical tools to help inform crisis response in Flint. Profs. Jacob Abernethy and Eric Schwartz of the Business School explain how in this article at the Conversation. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Artificial Intelligence  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Student Teams and Organizations  

Hacking Healthcare - How Big Data is Driving Big Changes in Medicine

The article by CoE writer Gabe Cherry highlights the work being done by Jenna Wiens and her collaborators on using big data to predict which hospital patients are at risk of developing a life-threatening intestinal infection called Clostridium difficile, or C. diff. It also provides context on the big data initiatives taking at UM in general and with respect to healthcare, and across EECS, including work by Prof. Barzan Mozafari on how to improve the design of big data databases. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Big Data  Hero, Alfred  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Michielssen, Eric  Mower Provost, Emily  Mozafari, Barzan  Wiens, Jenna  

Correlation is Not Causation: Electrical Analysis of St. Jude Implant Shows Normal Pacing

This blog post by the Archimedes Center for Medical Device Security provides additional technical detail regarding the claims by Muddy Waters and St. Jude regarding pacemaker/defibrillator security. Prof. Kevin Fu, who heads the Archimedes Center, and his collaborators at Michigan have concluded that those claims are questionable. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Holes Found in Report on St. Jude Medical Device Security

Michigan researchers including Prof. Kevin Fu have reproduced experiments alleging security flaws in St. Jude Medical's pacemakers and other life-saving medical devices and have concluded that those claims are questionable. The report alleging the security flaws was released last week by short-selling investment research firm Muddy Waters Capital LLC and medical device security firm MedSec Ltd. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Necmiye Ozay Receives NASA Early Career Faculty Award for Research in Cyber-Physical Systems

Prof. Necmiye Ozay, assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, was awarded a NASA Early Career Faculty award for her project, "Run-time anomaly detection and mitigation in information-rich cyber-physical systems." Her research will be designed to assist in future missions in space, while being applicable to a wide range of cyber-physical systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Cyber-physical systems  Lab-Systems  Ozay, Necmiye  Space technology  

Several Michigan Papers Presented at 2016 USENIX Security Symposium

Five papers authored by CSE researchers were presented at the 2016 USENIX Security Symposium, which took place August 10-12 in Austin, TX, and two papers were presented at WOOT 2016. USENIX Security brings together researchers from both academia and industry interested in the latest advances in the security of computer systems and networks. The symposium is a premier venue for security and privacy research. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Prakash, Atul  Shin, Kang G.  

Researchers David Adrian and Prof. J. Alex Halderman Receive Pwnie Award for Work on DROWN Attack

A research team that includes CSE PhD student David Adrian and Prof. J. Alex Halderman has been awarded the Pwnie Award for Best Cryptographic Attack at the Black Hat conference for their work on the DROWN attack. DROWN allows attackers to break encryption used to protect HTTPS websites and read or steal sensitive communications, including passwords, credit card numbers, trade secrets, or financial data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Solar power plant: $1.4M grant aims to cut costs

Nanotechnology could reduce the cost of the most expensive part of a solar thermal power plant by roughly 75 percent. The Department of Energy gave a team of researchers at the University of Illinois, the University of Michigan and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory $1.4 million to develop new solar concentrators. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy  Guo, L. Jay  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Power & Energy  Solar Cell Technology  

CSE-Based Startup Receives Funding to Develop Systems Based on Intelligent Personal Assistant Technology

Artificial Intelligence startup Clinc, founded by Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang along with Research Fellow Michael Laurenzano and CSE graduate student Johann Hauswald, is off and running in downtown Ann Arbor. On August 4, 2016, the company announced a $225,000 National Science Foundation Grant and closure of a $1.2 million round of seed funding. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Researchers Seek to Help the Disabled with Intelligent Robotic Wheelchair

Prof. Ben Kuipers, CSE graduate student Collin Johnson, and researcher Dr. Jong Jin Park have created Vulcan, an intelligent robotic wheelchair. Vulcan learns the spatial structure of the environment it moves through and it uses that knowledge to plan and follow routes from place to place. Robotic wheelchairs will benefit people who need a wheelchair, but are unable to use one because of multiple disabilities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kuipers, Benjamin  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

With Over 7 Million Certificates Issued, Let's Encrypt Aims to Secure the Entire Web

Let's Encrypt, the non-profit certificate authority founded by Prof. J. Alex Halderman with colleagues at Mozilla and Electronic Frontier Foundation, is well on its way to securing the web. By making the switch to HTTPS free and easy, Let's Encrypt has issued over 7 million certificates since December 2015. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Networks and Networking  Security (national and personal safety)  

New Venture is on the Path to Build Continual Learning AIs

Cogitai, Inc., a continual learning company co-founded by Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja, is developing AI technology that empowers machines to learn from interaction with the real world, enabling everyday things that sense and act to get smarter, more skilled, and more knowledgeable with experience. The company has recently announced funding by Sony. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Pioneering Engineering Education Research

A new initiative at the College of Engineering has brought U-M into the spotlight in the field of Engineering Education Research (EER). Spearheaded by Prof. David C. Munson, Jr. while he was Dean, the College took a unique approach to EER by embedding faculty directly into traditional engineering departments. A few other institutions had already developed standalone departments or schools for EER with their own sets of faculty and PhD students, but U-Ms approach is the first of its kind. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Education  Finelli, Cynthia  

Data Equality on the Internet Might Bring Unintended Consequences

Prof. Harsha Madhyastha was interviewed on Michigan Radio about the possibilities for unintended consequences of net neutrality, and the difficulty of finding an acceptable alternative. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Madhyastha, Harsha  Networks and Networking  

MARLO makes initial attempt at the Wave Field

Since he received a robot capable of walking outside, Jessy Grizzle has heard the siren call of the Wave Field, the undulating earthen art installation outside the Franois-Xavier Bagnoud building. MARLO finally got her shot at it. For now, Jessy and his graduate students are only attempting the easiest routes, between the grassy two- to three-foot moguls, over smaller undulations that Grizzle calls merely very difficult. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

A Bipedal Robot Gets Its Swagger On

Popular Science watches MARLO take a stroll across the wave field for the first time. "She's trained her whole life for this moment: MARLO recently stomped and stumbled her way through a new milestone at University of Michigan's Wave Field. The field an art installation turned robot testing ground offers new challenges for the bipedal robot's lateral and forward balance, because of its uneven terrain." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

MARLO the bipedal robot seems to be tipsy

MARLO has captured worldwide attention again with her exploration of the wave field on North Campus. As she tries to navigate the steep bumps with no sensors, just extraordinarily clever algorithms that have her adapting to what she "steps in," she appears to be, well, a bit drunk. This drunken behavior is just MARLO pushing the extremes of what a human-sized bipedal robot can do. See her on Gizmodo, Aol.On and MSN Video
Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

Can Slower Financial Traders Find a Haven in a World of High-Speed Algorithms?

In this article at The Conversation, Prof. Michael Wellman reviews the latency arms race at the center of high-speed algorithmic trading, in which the first trader to react is able to make money off of slower rivals. He describes the possibility for a frequent call market, in which speed no longer categorically prevails, and how it could be implemented. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wenisch, Thomas  

Tracking and Mitigating Tail Latency in Data Centers

Computer science researchers have developed a modular load tester platform for data centers which is designed to help measure and mitigate tail latency. Called Treadmill, it is described in their paper, "Treadmill: Attributing the Source of Tail Latency through Precise Load Testing and Statistical Inference." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Artificial Intelligence  Big Data  Computer Architecture  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Two Michigan Papers Win Top Awards at IEEE Security and Privacy Symposium

Two papers authored by EECS researchers were selected for top honors at the 37th IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy. One of the papers, describing and demonstrating a malicious hardware backdoor, received the Distinguished Paper Award. The second, which demonstrated security failings in a commercial smart home platform, received the Distinguished Practical Paper Award. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Computer Architecture  Graduate Students  Hicks, Matt  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Prakash, Atul  Security (Computing)  Sylvester, Dennis  

Proxy Optimizes Webpage Loading for Better User Experience

Researchers led by Prof. Harsha V. Madhyastha have developed a new web proxy called Klotski, which seeks to improve users' perceptions of how quickly a webpage loads on a mobile device by maximizing the amount of important content on the page that is fetched and displayed within the users attention span. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Madhyastha, Harsha  Networks and Networking  

A New, Low-Cost Way to Monitor Snow and Ice Thickness to Evaluate Environmental Change

Mohammad Mousavi, PhD student in ECE, earned a Weisnet Medal at the Eastern Snow Conference for his paper Elevation Angular Dependence of Wideband Autocorrelation Radiometric (WiBAR) Remote Sensing of Dry Snowpack and Lake Icepack, co-authored by Dr. Roger De Roo, Prof. Kamal Sarabandi, and Prof. Anthony England. The Weisnet Medal is presented to the best student paper at the conference. Mohammad has developed a new way to remotely measure the thickness of ice and snow with a technology he calls wideband autocorrelation radiometry (WiBAR), offering lower cost, lower power, and more flexibility than competing methods. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  England, Anthony W.  Environment  Graduate Students  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Patented Camera Calibration Tool Automates Calibration Target Acquisition

Prof. Edwin Olson and two of his former students, Johannes Strom and Andrew Richardson, have recently been awarded a United States Patent for their work in the development of AprilCal, an interactive camera calibration tool that automates the challenging task of calibration image acquisition. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Vision  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Collecting Data to Better Identify Bipolar Disorder

Prof. Emily Mower Provost is collaborating with researchers at the University of Michigan Depression Center to develop new technologies that provide individuals and their caregivers with insight into how bipolar disorder changes over time. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mower Provost, Emily  Women in Computing  

An Award Winning Radar System for Collision Avoidance and Imaging

Armin Jam, doctoral student in ECE, took first place in the student paper competition at the 2016 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation (AP-S) for his paper, "A Horizontally Polarized Beam-Steerable Antenna for Sub-millimeter-wave Polarimetric Imaging and Collision Avoidance Radars," co-authored by his advisor, Prof. Kamal Sarabandi. Armins research is focused on the development of a sub-millimeter-wave (sub-MMW) radar system for the next generation of navigation and imaging sensors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Antennas  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Autonomous Vehicles   Graduate Students  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Sarabandi, Kamal  

A New Way to Test Low-Frequency Antennas for Long-Range Communication

Jihun Choi, a doctoral student in Prof. Kamal Sarabandi's research group, has earned an honorable mention in the 2016 IEEE Symposium on Antennas and Propagation Student Paper Competition. His paper describes a new technique to test antennas for long-range communication applications. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Antennas  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Graduate Students  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Rada Mihalcea Leads Research Team to Develop Analytics for Learners as People

Prof. Rada Mihalcea has received funding from the Michigan Institute for Data Science (MIDAS) to uncover connections between personal attributes and success or well-being. The multidisciplinary research team includes Profs. Satinder Singh Baveja and Emily Mower Provost from CSE. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  Women in Computing  

CSE Faculty Amongst Researchers in Three of Four Funded MIDAS Projects

The Michigan Institute for Data Science (MIDAS) has funded four projects for $1.25M each in the first round of its Challenge Initiatives program, which is designed to fund extraordinary projects with major social impact. Prof. Rada Mihalcea is leading one of the projects, which seeks to uncover connections between personal attributes and success or well-being; overall, a number of CSE faculty are amongst the investigators in three of the four projects. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Engineering for the Greater Good  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

Two Papers by Michigan Researchers Chosen as IEEE Micro Top Picks

Two papers authored by EECS researchers have been selected for IEEE Micro's Top Picks from the 2015 Computer Architecture Conferences. The two papers from Michigan introduced the Sirius personal digital assistant and the MBus bus for modular microcomputing systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Computer Architecture  Dreslinski, Ron  Dutta, Prabal  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Mudge, Trevor  Tang, Lingjia  

U-M cyber security startup purchased by FICO

QuadMetrics, a cyber risk security startup co-founded by Prof. Mingyan Liu, announced it has been purchased. Analytic software company FICO of San Jose, Calif., bought QuadMetrics to help in its development of a FICO Enterprise Security Score. The scores will rank an organization's level of cyber security risk, the company said in a statement. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  Liu, Mingyan  Security (Computing)  Technology Transfer  

U-M researchers work to determine when people are lying

This article reports on work being done by Prof. Rada Mihalcea and Prof. Mihai Burzo (UM Flint), who have built unique lie-detecting software based on real-world data. Their prototype considers both a speaker's words and gestures, and unlike a polygraph, it doesn't need to touch the subject in order to work. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computational Linguistics  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  Women in Computing  

The AI Machines Undergoing Behavioral Psychology Tests

As reported in MIT Technology Review, graduate student researchers Junhyuk Oh and Valliappa Chockalingam, along with Profs. Satinder Singh Baveja and Honglak Lee have created mazes in Minecraft to perform reinforcement learning experiments on artificial intelligence entities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lee, Honglak  Machine Learning  

Injectable Computers Can Broadcast from Inside the Body

Profs. David Blaauw and David Wenzloff are designing millimeter-scale ultra-low-power sensing systems that can be injected into the body through a syringe. Unlike other radios of this size, these new devices are able to broadcast through the human body to an external receiver. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Wentzloff, David  Wireless Communications  

David Chesney Awarded Funding to Research Treatment for Traumatic Brain Injury

A team of researchers, including Dr. David Chesney and co-PI Dr. Rodney C. Daniels (Pediatric Critical Care) received funding for their research proposal at the Massey Foundation Traumatic Brain injury (TBI) Grand Challenge Pitch Day, which took place April 29th. Their research proposal was one of five U-M research proposals that were selected to receive funding. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chesney, David  Technology and Wellness  

This "Demonically Clever" Backdoor Hides in a Tiny Slice of a Computer Chip

This article in Wired describes work by Michigan researchers that demonstrates how a hacker could hide a malicious backdoor in silicon and trigger it to gain access to a computing system. Google engineer Yonatan Zunger is quoted as saying "This is the most demonically clever computer security attack Ive seen in years." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Blaauw, David  Computer Architecture  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Undetectable proof-of-concept chip poisoning uses analog circuits to escalate privilege

In this article, Cory Doctorow describes work by Michigan researchers that demonstrates a "novel, frightening attack on the integrity of microprocessors." The paper describes the attack, which is nearly undetectable, and how it can lead to full control of a computing system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Computer Architecture  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  Sylvester, Dennis  

Michigan and Verisign Researchers Demonstrate New Man-in-the-Middle WPAD Query Attack

Security researchers including Prof. Z. Morley Mao and CSE graduate student Qi Alfred Chen have demonstrated that new security ramifications exist when laptops and smartphones configured for enterprise systems and using generic top-level domains are used outside the enterprise in the realm of the wider web. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Networks and Networking  Security (Computing)  

Igor Markov and Collaborators Issue Second Edition of EDA Handbook

Professor Igor Markov and his co-editors Luciano Lavagno, Grant E. Martin, and Louis K. Scheffer have issued the second edition of the two-volume "Electronic Design Automation for Integrated Circuits Handbook," which has been published by CRC Press. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Markov, Igor  

Quora Knowledge Prize Winner Igor Markov Presents Winning Answer To Packed House at MLConf

Prof. Igor Markov was a featured speaker at the ML Conference, which took place May 20 in Seattle. His talk, entitled "Can AI Become a Dystopian Threat to Humanity? A Hardware Perspective," expanded on his answer to a Quora question on AI threats that won a Knowledge prize and another answer regarding how to identify chatbots. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Machine Learning  Markov, Igor  

Novel collaboration to probe brain activity in unprecedented detail

A pilot program led by Prof. Euisik Yoon will regularly bring together researchers with complementary expertise from different universities to collaborate on advancing research that may lead to a better understanding of the human brain and diseases that affect it. Yoon has been leading a key development of the Michigan Probe, a revolutionary tiny solid-state microsystem developed at U-M that can be used to probe the inner workings of the brain. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brain  LEDs  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Yoon, Euisik  

Security Risks in the Age of Smart Homes

CSE graduate student Earlence Fernandes writes about the security risks of connected homes in this article at The Conversation. Earlence is part of a research team that included Prof. Atul Prakash and Jaeyeon Jung of Microsoft, which exposed security flaws in Samsung's popular SmartThings product offerings. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Prakash, Atul  Security (Computing)  

Rada Mihalcea Coauthors New Book on Text Mining

Professor Rada Mihalcea and her collaborator Gabe Ignatow, Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of North Texas, have authored a new book entitled "Text Mining: A Guidebook for the Social Sciences," which has been published by Sage Publishing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Computational Linguistics  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

Pressure-Sensing Smartphones: Software Lets Mobile Devices Feel Force

Kang G. Shin, the Kevin and Nancy O'Connor Professor of Computer Science, and CSE graduate student Yu-Chih Tung have developed ForcePhone, software that allows smartphones to sense force or pressure on its screen or body. They envision many uses for their technology, which could offer the masses a coveted feature of the latest generation of smartphones. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Shin, Kang G.  

MARLO, the free-standing two-legged robot, conquers terrain with innovative control algorithms

MARLO, the free-standing bipedal robot developed by Prof. Jessy Grizzle's group, can now walk down steep slopes, through a thin layer of snow, and over uneven and unstable ground. The robots feedback control algorithms should be able to help other two-legged robots as well as powered prosthetic legs gain similar capabilities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Software Systems  Robotics  

Making Memory Smaller, Better, Faster, Stronger

As tiny embedded computers spread to every item in the home and beyond - fast, reliable memory is needed on an unheard-of scale. To fuel this ongoing revolution, Prof. Wei Lu and former student Dr. Sung Hyun Jo co-founded the company Crossbar, Inc. to tackle the physical limitations of conventional memory technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Embedded Computing and Systems  Entrepreneurship  Internet of Things  LNF  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Lu, Wei  Memristor  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Technology Transfer  

Walter Lasecki and Collaborators Win Best Paper at W4A

A team of four researchers including Prof. Walter Lasecki has won a Best Paper Award at the Web for All (W4A) Conference for "The Effects of Automatic Speech Recognition Quality on Human Transcription Latency," which explores how automated speech recognition and crowd-sourced human correction and generation of transcripts can be traded off to improve accuracy and latency. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Accessibility  Big Data  Interactive Systems  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Interactive Systems  Lab-Software Systems  Lasecki, Walter  

GridWatch Named Finalist in Vodafone's Eighth Annual Wireless Innovation Competition

GridWatch, a system for monitoring the state of the power grid using smartphones, has been selected as a finalist in the Vodafone Americas Foundation's Wireless Innovation Project competition. GridWatch is a collaboration between researchers at UM and UC Berkeley; the Michigan researchers include Prof. Prabal Dutta and graduate students Noah Klugman, Pat Pannuto, and William Huang. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dutta, Prabal  Energy  Graduate Students  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Sensors  

Dropping USB Drives Is the Easiest Trick Hackers Can Use - And You're Probably a Sucker

Researchers including CSE graduate student Zakir Durumeric have discovered a highly effective security hack to gain access to others' computing systems - leaving USB flash drives with malicious payloads laying on the ground. In their study, they found there is a nearly 50% chance that someone will pick up a given drive, plug it into their computer, and start clicking. This presents the opportunity for malware to be activated. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Jacob Abernethy: Machine Learning and the Wisdom of the Crowd

The National Science Foundation reports on the work of Prof. Jacob Abernethy, who is investigating the relationship between machine learning algorithms and market economy dynamics to develop socially beneficial forecasts. His work in this area is supported by a CAREER Award from NSF. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Economic Systems  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  

Show All