Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Research News

Protean Code Allows Data Center Servers to Adapt to Changing Environments with Breakthrough Compiler Technology

A team of CSE researchers including Prof. Jason Mars, Prof Lingjia Tang, and graduate student Michael Laurenzano has developed Protean Code, a technique which efficiently and continuously transforms the way in which the application programs running in data centers are recompiled in order to adapt to changing compute environments. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Code Compliation  Data Centers  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

The Future of Solar: $1.3M to Advance Organic Photovoltaics

The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Michigan Engineering Professor Stephen Forrests group a $1.35 million Next Generation Photovoltaics grant earlier this fall, aimed at advancing the practical viability of organic photovoltaics, a carbon-based version of solar technology that promises to radically change the way the suns energy is collected. Forrest is the Paul G. Goebel Professor of Engineering in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and Physics and the former U-M Vice President of Research. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  LEDs  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Optics and Photonics  Optoelectronics  Solar Cell Technology  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Sustainability  

Scott Mahlke Elected IEEE Fellow for Contributions to Compiler Code Generation and Automatic Processor Customization

CSE Associate Chair and Prof. Scott Mahlke has been named an IEEE Fellow, Class of 2015, "for contributions to compiler code generation and automatic processor customization." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Mahlke, Scott  Parallel Computing  

CS Researchers Introduce New Certificate Authority in Aim to Securely Encrypt Every Website

Computer science researchers including Prof. J. Alex Halderman and CSE graduate student James Kasten have announced Let's Encrypt, a free, automated, and open certificate authority that is intended to bring secure encryption to the entire web. Let's Encrypt was developed with the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Mozilla and will debut in summer 2015. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Networks and Networking  Security (Computing)  Software Lab  

Computer Scientists Win Best Paper Award at ACM IMC for Analysis of the Impact of the Recent Heartbleed Vulnerability

A team of computer scientists including Prof. J. Alex Halderman, CSE graduate student and lead co-author Zakir Durumeric, and CSE graduate students James Kasten and David Adrian, has won a Best Paper Award at the 2014 ACM Internet Measurement Conference for their comprehensive, measurement-based analysis of the impact of the recent Heartbleed vulnerability, and the server operator community's response to it. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Networks and Networking  Security (Computing)  Software Lab  Software Systems  

Yelin Kim Wins Best Student Paper Award at ACM Multimedia 2014 for Research in Facial Emotion Recognition

Yelin Kim has won the Best Student Paper Award at the 22nd ACM International Conference on Multimedia (ACM MM 2014) for her research in facial emotion recognition. The paper, "Say Cheese vs. Smile: Reducing Speech-Related Variability for Facial Emotion Recognition," was co-authored by her advisor, Prof. Emily Mower Provost. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Systems  Mower Provost, Emily  Signal and Image Processing   

Michigan and Prof. Forrest awarded photovoltaics R&D award from the U.S. Dept. of Energy SunShot Initiative

U-M was selected as part of the U.S. Dept. of Energy SunShot's "Next Generation Photovoltaics 3" program and was the only project awarded for organic photovoltaic ("OPV") research and development. Prof. Stephen Forrest said he very pleased to be able to continue his work on the SunShot Initiative. Forrest has achieved significant results in the area of organic photovoltaics, and believes they have the potential to redefine the cost structure of the solar industry and introduce solar power to untapped applications." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Energy  Forrest, Stephen  Solar Cell Technology  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Sustainability  

Yang Liu Receives Best Applications Paper Award for Cyber Security Research in Phishing

Yang Liu, Ph.D Candidate in Electrical Engineering:Systems, earned a Best Applications Paper Award from the ACM/IEEE International Conference on Data Science and Advanced Analytics (DSAA2014) for his recent research on phishing. His paper detailed his use of big data analysis to solve a major problem of cyber security [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Big Data  Communications  Graduate Students  Liu, Mingyan  Security (Computing)  

John P. Hayes Recognized with SIGDA Pioneering Achievement Award

John P. Hayes, Claude E. Shannon Professor of Engineering Science, has been recognized with the 2014 SIGDA Pioneering Achievement Award "for his pioneering contributions to logic design, fault tolerant computing, and testing." The award was given at ICCAD on Nov. 3 in San Jose. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Hayes, John  

Prof. Robert Dick to Apply Cyber Information to Air Quality Management

Prof. Robert Dick, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and specialist in embedded systems, received a CyberSEES grant to to study the impact of weather and human activity on production of, and exposure to, ozone and other air pollutants. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Dick, Robert  Embedded Computing and Systems  Environment  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  

Prof. Johanna Mathieu Working to Bring Power from Sustainable Sources to Your Home

ECE Prof. Johanna Mathieu received a grant under the NSF Cyber-Innovation for Sustainability Science and Engineering program to pursue "Data-driven approaches to managing uncertain load control in sustainable power systems." She is working on the problem of how best to integrate wind and solar power into the nation's established electrical grid system. The research may one day impact the nation's energy policy as it attempts to balance the cost of energy with the environmental impact of generating that energy. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grid  Mathieu, Johanna  Power & Energy  Wind Technology  

Prof. Becky Peterson Awarded DARPA Young Faculty Award to Investigate New Materials for Power Semiconductor Devices

Becky Peterson, assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, was recently awarded a 2014 DARPA Young Faculty Award for her research project, "Amorphous Oxide Thin Film Transistors for Switched-Mode Power Supplies." Such power supplies could potentially be used in a wide variety of wireless sensing and actuation systems, including those that deal with security and monitoring of the environment and medical conditions. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Peterson, Becky (R. L.)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Prof. Necmiye Ozay Awarded DARPA Young Faculty Award for Research in Cyber and Physical Systems

Necmiye Ozay, assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, has received a 2014 DARPA Young Faculty Award for her research project, Dynamics-based information extraction: a hybrid systems approach." Her research will impact the safety and security of cyber and physical systems. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Control Systems  Cyber-physical systems  Diversity and Outreach  Ozay, Necmiye  

Mapping the brain with lasers

Individual parts of the brain can be activated and de-activated by shining light on the neurons, and researchers are using this ability to chart how different areas of the brain function. To zoom in on individual neuron circuits within the brain, more precise light sources are needed. ECE professor Euisik Yoon is leading a team that will design and build these new light sources with a variety of lasers. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Brain  Health  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Yoon, Euisik  

Blue LED breakthrough for efficient electronics

In a step that could lead to longer battery life in smartphones and lower power consumption for large-screen televisions, Prof. Stephen Forrest and his team have extended the lifetime of blue organic light emitting diodes by a factor of 10. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Electronic devices  Forrest, Stephen  LEDs  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Fighting lung cancer with faster image processing

A new $1.9 million research program led by Prof. Jeff Fessler seeks to make low-dose computed tomography scans a viable screening technique by speeding up the image reconstruction from half an hour or more to just five minutes.The advance could be particularly important for fighting lung cancers, as symptoms often appear too late for effective treatment. Prof. Thomas Wenisch is collaborating on the project. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Medical Imaging  Medical diagnosis  Signal and Image Processing   Wenisch, Thomas  

Jia Deng Wins Best Paper Award at ECCV

Prof. Jia Deng and his collaborators have won the Best Paper Award at ECCV for "Large-Scale Object Classification using Label Relation Graphs." It addresses a computer's ability to accurately classify objects in images, which is a fundamental challenge in computer vision research and an important building block for tasks such as localization, detection, and scene parsing. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Deng, Jia  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Kyu-Tae Lee Wins Best Poster Award for Colorful Solar Cells

ECE graduate student Kyu-Tae Lee received a Best Poster Award at the 40th Annual Michigan AVS Symposium. His poster described the creation of solar cell device structures that enable attractive multi-colored solar cells that can be used on windows and other interior and exterior surfaces. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Guo, L. Jay  Solar Cell Technology  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Shared Memory in Mobile Operating Systems Provides Ingress Point for Hackers

Computer science researchers have exposed a shared memory weakness believed to exist in Android, Windows, and iOS operating systems that could be used to obtain personal information from unsuspecting users. The research team has demonstrated how passwords, photos, and other personal information can be stolen while users use popular mainstream apps. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Security (Computing)  

Researchers Expose Security Flaws in Backscatter X-ray Scanners

A team of security researchers including Prof. J. Alex Halderman and graduate student Eric Wustrow have discovered several security vulnerabilities in the full-body backscatter X-ray scanners that were deployed to U.S. airports between 2009 and 2013. The researchers were able to slip knives, guns, and other contraband past the systems. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Sensors in the Soil (video)

Soil moisture information is just as important to NASA engineers as it is to local farmers. For example, this data is used to monitor climate patterns and predict landslides. Prof. Mingyan Liu is working on a system that will make collecting and analyzing this data more accurate. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Communications  Environment  Liu, Mingyan  Sensors  

Researchers Demo Hack to Seize Control of Municipal Traffic Signal Systems

Computer science researchers working with Prof. J. Alex Halderman have demonstrated that a number of security flaws exist in commonly-deployed networked traffic signal systems that leave the systems vulnerable to attack or manipulation. They presented their findings at the 8th USENIX Workshop on Offensive Technologies. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Solving the Big Data Dilemma

Prof. Laura Balzano talks about how to get the best results from big collections of data. Science, healthcare, economics, infrastructure and government could be completely changed by effectively using big data. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Balzano, Laura  Big Data  Environment  Health  Information Technology  Signal and Image Processing   

Can Our Computers Continue to Get Smaller and More Powerful?

In an article in this week's issue of the journal Nature, Prof. Igor Markov reviews limiting factors in the development of computing systems to help determine what is achievable, identifying "loose" limits and viable opportunities for advancements through the use of emerging technologies. His research for this project was funded by the National Science Foundation, the Semiconductor Research Corporation, and the Air Force Research Laboratory. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Markov, Igor  

Vulnerabilities Demonstrated in Traffic Signal Controls

Students in Prof. J. Alex Halderman's recent EECS 588 course, including graduate student Brandon Ghena, have demonstrated vulnerabilities that would allow hackers to take control of municipal traffic light systems. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

New graphene sensor technology for personal and environmental health

A new wearable vapor sensor could one day offer continuous disease monitoring for patients with diabetes, high blood pressure, anemia or lung disease. The new sensor, which can detect airborne chemicals either exhaled or released through the skin, would likely be the first wearable to pick up a broad array of chemical, rather than physical, attributes. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Environment  Medical diagnosis  Sensors  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Wearable electronics  Zhong, Zhaohui  

Optoelectronics: A practical polariton laser

In this article, the author describes the importance of Prof. Bhattacharya's room-temperature, eletrically injected polariton laser, stating that it, "represents an important step towards the practical implementation of polaritonic light sources. In many ways, the first report of a semiconductor laser device based on BoseEinstein condensation that is pumped electrically at room temperature opens a new era in optoelectronics. It may not be long before polaritonic devices start to claim their share of the optoelectronics market, just as double heterostructure devices did 40 years ago." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  Optoelectronics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Shrinking the size of optical systems, exponentially

ECE researchers have developed a way to exponentially shrink the size of a system typically needed to control the polarization of light, while maintaining the high level of performance needed for numerous optical applications such as color displays, microscopy and photography. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Graduate Students  Grbic, Anthony  Guo, L. Jay  LNF  Metamaterials  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Gurkan Gok Receives Paper Award for Making Better Antenna Beams

Gurkan Gok (PhD, EE 2014, exp) won Third Place in the Student Paper Competition at the 2014 IEEE Int. Symposium on Antennas and Propagation for his paper that describes an antenna beam former that he developed using metamaterials. The design strategy provides new opportunities in smart antenna development. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Antennas  Applied Electromagnetics  Graduate Students  Grbic, Anthony  

Jiangfeng Wu Receives Best Paper Award for Research in Safe Fracking

Jiangfeng Wu, graduate student in electrical engineering, received the Mikio Takagi Student Prize for his research in designing and building an antenna that can better determine the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. The Mikio Takagi Student Prize is given to the best of the top three Student Prize Paper Awards granted at the IEEE Int. Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics  Environment  Graduate Students  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Barzan Mozafari and Collaborators Chosen for Best Demo at ACM SIGMOD

Prof. Barzan Mozafari and his collaborators have received the Best Demo Award at the 2014 ACM SIGMOD/PODS Conference. The demo was of their Analytical Bootstrap (ABS) System, which enables complex exploratory data analysis on large volumes of data. ABS is described in their paper, ABS: a System for Scalable Approximate Queries with Accuracy Guarantees. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Big Data  Mozafari, Barzan  

Jeremy Gibson Authors Book on Game Design, Prototyping, and Programming

Independent game designer and CSE Lecturer Jeremy Gibson has authored a new book entitled Introduction to Game Design, Prototyping, and Development, which for the first time brings these three disciplines together in a single volume. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Game Design and Development  Gibson, Jeremy  

Audio Story: Dissecting Voices to Find the Hidden Call For Help

This New Tech City Audio Story on wNYC describes work that Prof. Emily Mower Provost is doing in conjunction with psychiatrist Melvin McInnis to use smartphones in detecting the mood swings of patients with bipolar disorder as they talk on smartphones. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Medical diagnosis  Mower Provost, Emily  

Wakefield and Kieras Win Best Paper Award at ICAD 2014

Profs. Gregory Wakefield and David Kieras, along with three coauthors from the Air Force Research Laboratory at the Wright Patterson Air Force Base, received the Best Paper Award at the 20th International Conference on Auditory Display for EPIC Modeling of a Two-Talker CRM Listening Task. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Acoustic Processing  Kieras, David  Wakefield, Gregory H.  

Thomas Frost Receives Best Paper Award for Achieving a HQ QD Red Laser

Thomas Frost received a Best Paper Award for achieving a high quality quantum dot red laser using novel materials. Lasers emitting in the 600nm wavelength range have important applications in medicine, optical information processing, plastic fiber communication systems, optical storage, and full color laser displays and laser projectors. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  Graduate Students  LNF  Lasers  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

David Kieras Wins a Best Paper Award at CHI 2014

Prof. David Kieras has coauthored Towards Accurate and Practical Predictive Models of Active-Vision-Based Visual Search, which has been selected for a SIGCHI Best of CHI Best Paper Award at the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Kieras, David  Lab-Interactive Systems  

Grant Schoenebeck Selected for Facebook Faculty Award

Prof. Grant Schoenebeck has been selected as the recipient of a Facebook Faculty Award for his work in theoretical computer science and its potential for impact in the area of social networking. He is currently working on better understanding "complex" contagions, which, unlike diseases and rumors, typically require more than one neighbor for infection. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Schoenebeck, Grant  Theory  

Metal particles in memristors do not stay put

In work that unmasks some of the magic behind memristors and RRAM, cutting-edge computer components that combine logic and memory functions, researchers have shown that the metal particles in memristors don't stay put as previously thought. The findings have broad implications for the semiconductor industry and beyond. They show, for the first time, exactly how some memristors remember. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lu, Wei  Memristor  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

New Research Program to Investigate Optical Energy Conversion

ECE is home to a new major research program that aims to provide a better understanding of phenomena driven by the magnetic field component of light. A key long-term goal of this five-year, $7.5M MURI, called the Center for Dynamic Magneto-Optics (DYNAMO), is to investigate the prospects for direct conversion of light to electricity without the thermodynamic losses typical of photovoltaic (solar cell) technology. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Energy  Optics and Photonics  Rand, Stephen  

A better light bulb

Already a key lighting material for smart phones, a new approach to building phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) will make them useful even for general lighting. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Energy  Forrest, Stephen  LEDs  Lighting  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

MEMS Research by Muzhi Wang Recognized at IMS 2014

ECE graduate student Muzhi Wang received a best student paper award, honorable mention, at the 2014 IEEE International Microwave Symposium (IMS2014) for his research in RF MEMS switches for high-power RF applications. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Graduate Students  MEMS and Microsystems  Rais-Zadeh, Mina  

Designing robots that assemble and adapt

What happens when you send a rolling robot out for a mission, and it turns out to need legs instead? In this video, Shai Revzen, assistant professor of ECE, describes how his team is working to create "self-assembling" robots that can build themselves into any form required. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Control Systems  Revzen, Shai  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Computer Scientists Author Book on Hardware Prefetching

Professor Thomas F. Wenisch and his collaborator Prof. Babak Falsafi of EPFL Switzerland have authored a new book entitled A Primer on Hardware Prefetching, which has been published by Morgan & Claypool as one of their Synthesis Lectures on Computer Architecture. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Wenisch, Thomas  

A new way to make laser-like beams using 250x less power

With precarious particles called polaritons that straddle the worlds of light and matter, ECE researchers have demonstrated a new, practical and potentially more efficient way to make a coherent laser-like beam. They have made what's believed to be the first room-temperature polariton laser that is fueled by electrical current as opposed to light. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Bhattacharya, Pallab  CPHOM  LNF  Lasers  Optics and Photonics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Robotics Researchers Ready for Automated Vehicle Test Facility

CoE robotics researchers Prof. Edwin Olson of CSE and Prof. Ryan Eustice of NAME will be amongst the first users of the Mobility Transformation Facility, the automated vehicle test facility being built on North Campus. The two will initially use the facility to run tests related to the development of sensing and mapping technology. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  Robotics and Computer Vision  Transportation  

Making Smartphones Smarter: HiJack Adopted for Use in Commercial Product

HiJack, the hardware/software platform for use in creating cubic-inch sensor peripherals for smartphones, has been adopted for use in a product offering by NXP Semiconductors. HiJack was developed under the direction of Prof. Prabal Dutta, and allows for the integration of sensors to a smartphone through the phone's audio jack, making it a universal, low cost interface. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Dutta, Prabal  Mobile Computing  

Small, Simple Terahertz Detector Converts The Pulses To Sound

"Terahertz waves, which are non-ionizing and can penetrate fabrics and body tissue, could be used to reveal hidden weapons and spot skin cancer and tooth decay. But they are notoriously difficult to detect. Engineers at the University of Michigan have invented a simple new way to sense them." [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  Norris, Theodore B.  Optics and Photonics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Terahertz Technology  

T-ray converts light to sound for weapons detection, medical imaging

A research team led by Profs. Jay Guo and Ted Norris created a device that turns terahertz waves (T-rays) into ultrasound, which can then be detected by a highly sensitive acoustic sensor. Applications for T-rays include weapons detection, medical imaging, and astronomy. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  CPHOM  Guo, L. Jay  Medical Imaging  Norris, Theodore B.  Optics and Photonics  Optoelectronics  Security (national and personal safety)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Terahertz Technology  

Researchers Identify Security Risks in Estonian Online Voting System

Ahead of European Parliamentary elections on May 25, an international team of independent experts, including Prof. J. Alex Halderman and CSE graduate students Travis Finkenauer and Drew Springall, has identified major risks in the security of Estonia's Internet voting system and recommended its immediate withdrawal. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Security (Computing)  

Research in Machine Learning earns Notable Paper Award at AISTATS 2014

Prof. Clay Scott received a Notable Paper Award at the 2014 Int. Conf. on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics for his research in the area of machine learning. The theoretical research has applications in big data problems such as crowd sourcing, topic modeling, and nuclear particle classification. [Full Story]
Related Topics:  Big Data  Machine Learning  Scott, Clayton D.  Signal and Image Processing