Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Research News

Walter Lasecki and Collaborators Win Best Paper at W4A

A team of four researchers including Prof. Walter Lasecki has won a Best Paper Award at the Web for All (W4A) Conference for "The Effects of Automatic Speech Recognition Quality on Human Transcription Latency," which explores how automated speech recognition and crowd-sourced human correction and generation of transcripts can be traded off to improve accuracy and latency. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Accessibility  Big Data  Interactive Systems  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Interactive Systems  Lab-Software Systems  Lasecki, Walter  

GridWatch Named Finalist in Vodafone's Eighth Annual Wireless Innovation Competition

GridWatch, a system for monitoring the state of the power grid using smartphones, has been selected as a finalist in the Vodafone Americas Foundation's Wireless Innovation Project competition. GridWatch is a collaboration between researchers at UM and UC Berkeley; the Michigan researchers include Prof. Prabal Dutta and graduate students Noah Klugman, Pat Pannuto, and William Huang. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dutta, Prabal  Energy  Graduate Students  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Sensors  

Dropping USB Drives Is the Easiest Trick Hackers Can Use - And You're Probably a Sucker

Researchers including CSE graduate student Zakir Durumeric have discovered a highly effective security hack to gain access to others' computing systems - leaving USB flash drives with malicious payloads laying on the ground. In their study, they found there is a nearly 50% chance that someone will pick up a given drive, plug it into their computer, and start clicking. This presents the opportunity for malware to be activated. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Jacob Abernethy: Machine Learning and the Wisdom of the Crowd

The National Science Foundation reports on the work of Prof. Jacob Abernethy, who is investigating the relationship between machine learning algorithms and market economy dynamics to develop socially beneficial forecasts. His work in this area is supported by a CAREER Award from NSF. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Economic Systems  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  

University Collaborates with Toyota on Autonomous Vehicle Hub

Toyota and Michigan have announced a new research collaboration that will involve a new Toyota facility, Mcity, and two faculty with appointments in CSE: Profs. Edwin Olson and Ryan Eustice. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

With Hospital Ransomware Infections, the Patients Are at Risk

The article in MIT Technology Review quotes Prof. Kevin Fu on the recent string of ransomware attacks against hospitals. Prof. Fu's research is in the area of security for medical equipment, from implanted devices through bedside monitoring equipment, medical diagnostic equipment, and medical IT systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Malware Attacks On Hospitals Put Patients At Risk

The article at NPR describes recent cases in which hospitals became the victims of ransomware attacks. Prof. Kevin Fu, an expert on the security vulnerabilities of medical equipment, is quoted. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Fundamental science will play a key role in finding cancer cure

Prof. David Blaauw is part of a team that NSF recently funded to develop millimeter-sized, ultra-low-power electronic biosensors for implantation in tumors to determine chemotherapy impacts. Monitoring of tumor micro-environments during therapy could inform chemotherapy duration, result in more successful chemotherapy and advance the science of implantable biosensors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Cancer  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  Wentzloff, David  

U-M Researchers Launch Fight Against C. difficile with $9.2M Grant from NIH

CSE Prof. Jenna Wiens is a part of the U-M research team that has launched a $9.2 million effort to prevent and treat C. difficile infections. The team was awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health, which is part of the U.S. governments $1.2 billion effort for a multi-agency attack on antibiotic-resistant bacteria. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Wiens, Jenna  

Machine Learning Proves Useful for Analyzing NBA Ball Screen Defense

A research team including Avery McIntyre (December 2015 alumnus of the undergraduate CS program at Michigan) and Prof. Jenna Wiens has used machine learning to extract information from NBA sports data for automatically recognizing common defense strategies to ball screens. They shared their findings at the 10th MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference in Boston. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Wiens, Jenna  

MEMS research to assist in treatment of glaucoma selected as a featured article

The paper, Resonant magnetoelastic microstructures for wireless actuation of liquid flow on 3D surfaces and use in glaucoma drainage implants, by Venkatram Pepakayala, Joshua Stein and Prof. Yogesh Gianchandani, was selected as a Featured Article in the journal, Microsystems & Nanoengineering. The researchers created wireless MEMS actuators that facilitate the flow of fluids on the surface of implantable glaucoma drainage devices that help lower eye pressure.
Related Topics:  Gianchandani, Yogesh  MEMS and Microsystems  WIMS/WIMS2  

MEMS Fabrication Research Highlighted by the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering

The paper, A Fabrication Process for the Monolithic Integration of Magnetoelastic Actuators and Silicon Sensors, by Jun Tang, Dr. Scott Green, and Prof. Yogesh Gianchandani has been selected as one of the 2015 Highlights of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. The researchers achieved a microfabrication process that can be used for specific types of MEMS motors used in wireless sensing systems on a silicon substrate.
Related Topics:  Gianchandani, Yogesh  MEMS and Microsystems  WIMS/WIMS2  

A better 3D camera with clear, graphene light detectors

A camera that can record 3D images and video is under development, with $1.2 million in funding from the W.M. Keck Foundation. The new technology makes use of the special characteristics of graphene, and is anticipated to have dramatic applications in artificial bionic eyes, industrial imaging, robotic vision, and medical imaging. Leading the research are professors Ted Norris, Zhaohui Zhong, and Jeff Fessler. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Graphene  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Lab-Systems  Medical Imaging  Norris, Theodore B.  Optics and Photonics  Signal and Image Processing   Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Zhong, Zhaohui  

Do kids learn more when they trade in composition books for iPads?

Prof. Elliot Soloway is quotes in this Washington Post article that examines the role of technology, specifically mobile devices, in learning and education. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Interactive Systems  Soloway, Elliot  Technology for Education  

Honglak Lee Selected for Sloan Research Fellowship

Assistant Professor Honglak Lee has been selected for a 2016 Sloan Research Fellowship by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation for his work in deep learning and representation learning. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lee, Honglak  

Michael J. Cafarella Selected for Sloan Research Fellowship

Assistant Professor Michael J. Cafarella has been selected for a 2016 Sloan Research Fellowship by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation for his work in mining and processing large and distributed datasets. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cafarella, Michael  Lab-Software Systems  

Mosharaf Chowdhury Receives Google Faculty Research Award to Develop Improved Analytics for Geo-Distributed Datasets

Prof. Mosharaf Chowdhury has been awarded a 2016 Google Faculty Research Award for his work in network-aware analytics of geo-distributed datasets, with a goal of improved application-level performance. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Chowdhury, Mosharaf  Data Centers  Lab-Software Systems  Networks and Networking  

Power Harvesting Sensor Patch Uses Your Body As a Battery

IEEE Spectrum reported on a sensor patch that can power itself by using thermoelectric materials to turn the temperature difference between your body and the surrounding air into electricity. The project, based at North Caroline State University's Center for Advanced Self-Powered Systems of Integrated Sensors (ASSIST), involves Prof. David Wentzloff, who specializes in integrated circuit design for adaptable wireless communication systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sensors  Wentzloff, David  

Injectable Radios to Broadcast From Inside the Body

IEEE Spectrum reported on medical devices being developed at Michigan that may one day be small enough to go through a syringe. Professors David Blaauw and David Wentzloff are collaborating with researchers at the U-M medical school to come up with the first test application. These devices will be able to monitor oxygen, glucose, and other biometrics, or follow disease progression in tumors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Health  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sensors  Wentzloff, David  

Necmiye Ozay Receives CAREER Award for Research in Cyber-Physical Systems

Prof. Necmiye Ozay, assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, was awarded an NSF CAREER award for her research project, "A Compositional Approach to Modular Cyber-Physical Control System Design." This research is applicable to a wide variety of safety-critical and autonomous systems, including next generation air vehicles, automotive systems, robotics and smart manufacturing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cyber-physical systems  Lab-Systems  Ozay, Necmiye  

Jenna Wiens Receives NSF CAREER Award to Increase the Utility of Machine Learning in Clinical Care

Assistant Professor Jenna Wiens has been awarded an NSF CAREER grant for her research project, "CAREER: Adaptable, Intelligible, and Actionable Models: Increasing the Utility of Machine Learning in Clinical Care." Under this project, she will develop data-driven predictive models to transform large and diverse datasets into actionable knowledge for improved patient care. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Wiens, Jenna  

Barzan Mozafari Receives NSF CAREER Award to Improve Predictability of Database Systems

Assistant Professor Barzan Mozafari has been awarded an NSF CAREER grant for his research project, "CAREER: Designing a Predictable Database - An Overlooked Virtue." Under this project, Prof. Mozafari aims to restore the missing virtue of predictability in the design of database systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Databases  Lab-Software Systems  Mozafari, Barzan  

Energy researchers receive $1.4 million grant

Researchers from the University, including ECE's Prof. Ian Hiskens, have received a $1.4 million grant from the Department of Energy to help develop data on power system optimization in energy grids. The team will work to develop new test cases to formulate better software algorithms for transmission operators to run the energy grid algorithms which regulate energy amounts. These operators are largely non-profit government agencies. The need for such research stems from the ongoing energy transition from traditional, emission-heavy sources such as coal and nuclear power to cleaner, renewable sources like wind and solar. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy  Environment  Grid  Hiskens, Ian  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  

What good is Nanotechnology? NBC Learn brings us Jay Guo to find out

How could something only billionths of a meter thick defend against water, dirt, wear, and even bacteria? Working at the nanoscale, scientists and engineers, like Jay Guo are creating protective nanoscale coatings and layers. These surfaces have applications in energy, electronics, medicine, and could even be used to make a plane invisible. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Somin Lee Receives AFOSR Young Investigator Award for Research in Bioplasmonics

Prof. Somin Eunice Lee received a Young Investigator Award from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) to support research that will ultimately help our basic understanding of how tissues form distinct shapes and structure to become organs, such as lungs, salivary glands, and mammary glands. This understanding will facilitate new strategies to engineer replacement tissues. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lee, Somin E.  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

U-M, IBM Partner on Advanced Conversational Computing System

The University of Michigan and IBM have launched a $4.5 million collaboration to develop a new class of conversational technologies that will enable people to interact more naturally and effectively with computers. Under the project, the researchers will develop a cognitive system that functions as an academic advisor for undergraduate computer science and engineering majors at the university. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lasecki, Walter  Lee, Honglak  Mars, Jason  Mihalcea, Rada  Mower Provost, Emily  Radev, Dragomir  Tang, Lingjia  

Censys Enables Fast Searching of Actionable Internet Data

CSE researchers have introduced Censys, a search engine that enables researchers to ask questions about the hosts and networks that compose the Internet and get an immediate reply. Censys builds on past work at Michigan that produced the first fast Internet-wide scanner, ZMap. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Networks and Networking  Security (Computing)  

U-M, Ford are First to Address Autonomous Driving on Snow-Covered Roads

Researchers at U-M and Ford have tested new technology that allows autonomous vehicles to navigate on snow-covered streets. Their solution combines live LIDAR data with learned 3D map stores to enable the systems to compute location and to drive successfully. It is believed that this is the first test to address the challenges of snow-covered roads. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

How someday robots may run to the rescue -- literally

Prof. Jessy Grizzle Grizzle, along with a group of robotics engineers and students at U-M, is not only working to develop algorithms -- self-contained, step-by-step operations -- to be performed by walking robots, he's working to revolutionize them. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

Michigan Researchers Win the 2016 Applied Networking Research Prize

A team of researchers, including CSE graduate students Zakir Durumeric, David Adrian, James Kasten, CS student Ariana Mirian, and Prof. J. Alex Halderman have received The Applied Networking Research Prize (ANRP) for their paper, "Neither Snow Nor Rain Nor MITM... An Empirical Analysis of Email Delivery Security". The Applied Networking Research Prize (ANRP) recognizes the best new ideas in networking. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Mapping the brain: Probes with tiny LEDs shed light on neural pathways

With the help of light-emitting diodes as small as neurons, University of Michigan researchers are unlocking the secrets of neural pathways in the brain. The researchers have built and tested in mice neural probes that hold what are believed to be the smallest implantable LEDs ever made. The new probes can control and record the activity of many individual neurons, measuring how changes in the activity of a single neuron can affect its neighbors. The team anticipates that experiments using probes based on their design could lead to breakthroughs in understanding and treating neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brain  Health  Ku, Pei-Cheng (P.C.)  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Yoon, Euisik  

Smarter renewable power: six innovations

Innovations are helping renewable energy become more accessible, powerful and effective. Among these are solar cells inspired by ancient Japanese paper cutting. Using this technique allows the cells to flex and track the sun for increased effieciency. The concept was developed in part by Prof. Stephen Forrest, working with prof. Max Shtein in MSE and Matt Shlian in U-M Art and Design. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Solar Cell Technology  

2015 CSE Graduate Student Honors Competition Highlights Outstanding Research

Biruk Mammo was the winner of the 2015 CSE Graduate Student Honors Competition. The competition culminated on November 23, when four finalists presented on an area of their research, with a panel of CSE faculty and industry sponsors from Northrop Grumman ranking the presentations. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Ford, Michigan Researchers Test First Autonomous Vehicle at Mcity

Profs. Edwin Olson and Ryan Eustice, working with Ford Motor Company, have been the first to test a fully autonomous vehicle at the University's Mcity test facility. The Ford vehicle features sensing and AI technology developed at Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  Transportation  

The Promise and Perils of Predictive Policing Based on Big Data

Given our ability to sift through big data and to make predictions from it, we should not be surprised to learn that police departments are using data analysis to move toward "predictive policing." In this article, Prof. HV Jagadish comments on the potential benefits and pitfalls of such approaches. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Jagadish, HV  Lab-Software Systems  

U-M Leading International Neurotechnology 'Dream Team' for Brain Research and Education

A "dream team" of experts in sensors, electronics, data analysis and neuroscience has been awarded a $5 million grant to help unravel the mysteries of the brain and cross-train an international group of neuroscientists and engineers. The project is directed by Prof. Euisik Yoon, and includes experts and partner institutions around the world. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brain  International Prog. for the Adv. of Neurotechnology  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Sensors  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Wise, Kensall  Yoon, Euisik  

The Future of Data Science: Kicking Off U-Ms Proactive Step into an Exploding Field

Researchers from around the nation gathered at Rackham on October 6 to celebrate the official launch of Michigans $100M Data Science Initiative. Central to this program is the new Michigan Institute for Data Science (MIDAS), which aims to make sense of the massive datasets researchers in every field now have at their disposal. The symposium, titled The Future of Data Science: A Convergence of Academia, Industry, and Government, was an all-day event featuring representatives of many major industries and academic institutions. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Big Data  Data Centers  Health  Hero, Alfred  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Lab-Systems  Michielssen, Eric  

Phosphorescent OLEDs glow deep blue - almost ready for prime time

A new molecule developed by researchers at the University of Michigan and the University of Southern California shines a deep blue that is close to meeting the stringent brightness requirements of the National Television Systems Committee. "Bright, deep blue, phosphorescent emitters have been very elusive. Our work has resulted in deep, display quality blue at very high efficiency and extremely high brightness," said Stephen Forrest, the Peter A. Franken Distinguished University Professor of Engineering and Paul G. Goebel Professor of Engineering. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Displays  Forrest, Stephen  LEDs  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Getting the Light Out (of OLEDs)

Researchers at the University of Michigan have discovered a way to get 50% more light out of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), bringing them one step closer to more widespread adoption as a general lighting source, while increasing their value in displays. OLED technologies, a nearly $16B market, are already found in more than 750 million smartphone and tablet screens worldwide. The appearance of OLED technology in the world of general lighting is steadily growing, and as of 2014 can even be found in lighting fixtures sold at Home Depot. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Lighting  

Layered Graphene Beats the Heat

An international team of researchers, led by Ted Norris, Gerard A. Mourou Professor, have found that a layered form of graphene can expel heat efficiently, which is an important feature for its potential applications in building small and powerful electronics. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graphene  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Norris, Theodore B.  Optics and Photonics  

Inspired by art, lightweight solar cells track the sun

Solar cells capture up to 40 percent more energy when they can track the sun across the sky, but conventional, motorized trackers are too heavy and bulky for pitched rooftops and vehicle surfaces. Now, by borrowing from kirigami, the ancient Japanese art of paper cutting, researchers at the University of Michigan have developed solar cells that can have it both ways. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy  Environment  Forrest, Stephen  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Research  Solar Cell Technology  

Glucose Monitoring with Lasers

200 million estimated people with diabetes might one day utilize laser research going on at the University of Michigan to painlessly read their glucose levels. Professor Mohammed Islam is leading the reconstruction of super continuum lasers he designed to aid the military detect the chemical composition in camouflage nets and explosives into a non-invasive tool to measure a teaspoon of glucose in the blood system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health  Islam, Mohammed  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lasers  

U of Michigan Project Combines Modeling and Machine Learning

This article in HPC Wire highlights ConFlux, the unique new facility, funded largely by NSF, to be built at Michigan which will enable supercomputer simulations to interface with large datasets while running. Prof. Barzan Mozafari will oversee the implementation ConFlux. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Software Systems  Mozafari, Barzan  Supercomputing  

Michigan Researchers Win Best Paper Award at VLDB 2015

Prof. H.V. Jagadish, the Bernard A. Galler Collegiate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and CSE graduate student Fei Li have received the Best Paper Award at the 41st International Conference on Very Large Data Bases, which took place Aug 31st - Sept 4th in Kohala Coast, Hawaii. Their paper is entitled "Constructing an Interactive Natural Language Interface for Relational Databases". [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Jagadish, HV  Lab-Software Systems  

University of Michigan Develops Social Sensory Surfaces for Autism Therapy [Video]

This story on WDET covers the work of students from EECS and the School of Art and Architecture in creating a blend of light, music, and structure to provide highly sensory experiences for children with autism spectrum disorder. Prof. Sean Ahlquist is interviewed; Dr. David Chesney appears in the video. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chesney, David  Engineering for the Greater Good  Technology and Wellness  

Michigan Rolls a Different Kind of Car off a Different Kind of Assembly Line

This story on the Big Ten Network highlights the work of Prof. Edwin Olson, who is using 3-D printed low-speed electric vehicles provided by alternative carmaker Local Motors to develop an intelligent transportation on demand system built around autonomous vehicles. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  Transportation  

Mary Lou Dorf Wins Best Paper Award at ASEE

Dr. Mary Lou Dorf and her collaborators have received the Best Paper Award at the 122nd American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference and Exhibition (ASEE) for their paper entitled, "Student Performance Improvement using Interactive Textbooks: A Three-University Cross-Semester Analysis." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dorf, Mary Lou  Technology for Education  Women in Computing  

Researchers Employ Unsupervised Funniness Detection in the New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest

Researchers including Prof. Dragomir Radev and his former student and alumnus Rahul Jha teamed up with Bob Mankoff, Cartoon Editor for The New Yorker, to take a computational approach to understanding humor. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Radev, Dragomir  

Improving the image quality of ultra-low dose CT scans with big data

Prof. Jeffrey Fessler is collaborating with alumnus Prof. Yong Long on research that aims to provide high image quality CT scans while reducing the X-ray radiation dose to an ultra-low level. The team expects to achieve dramatically improved results by including big data analysis of existing CT images in their approach. Prof. Fessler's research in medical imaging is one of five joint projects to receive continued funding as part of the University of Michigan and Shanghai Jiao Tong University Collaborative Research Programs for Energy and Biomedical Technology. The program funds projects that have commercial potential and are likely to attract follow-on research funding from the U.S. and Chinese governments, as well as industry. [read the announcement in The University Record] [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cancer  Fessler, Jeffrey  Lab-Systems  Medical Imaging  

An Autonomous "SmartCart" Testbed is Coming to Michigan

Researchers led by EECS Prof. Edwin Olson and NAME Prof. Ryan Eustice will be using 3D printed "SmartCarts" at Mcity to develop an on-demand autonomous transit system. The focus of this particular project is not the autonomy itself, but the challenges of an intelligent transit system that include understanding passengers' preferences and expectations, coordinating the routes of a fleet of vehicles, and figuring out how to balance supply and demand. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

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