Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

EECS Research News

Jan 29, 2013
Zhaohui Zhong Receives CAREER Award for Research in Graphene-based Optoelectronics    Bookmark and Share
Prof. Zhaohui Zhong, assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, was recently awarded an NSF CAREER award for his research project, "Graphene Heterostructures Based Hot Carrier Optoelectronics."   More Info

Related Topics:  Graphene   Optics and Photonics   Optoelectronics   Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology   Zhong, Zhaohui   

Other News

Bay Area CSE Alumni and Friends are Invited to Join Us for Tech Talks

Bay Area CSE alumni and friends are invited to join us for tech talks, conversation and hors d'oeuvres including Zingerman's from Ann Arbor on May 7th. More info and registration here. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Over 600 Students Present Final Projects at EECS 183 Showcase

On Friday, April 24th, a number of students, parents, and professors attended the EECS 183 Showcase at Palmer Commons. Non-CS students from EECS 183, Elementary Programming Concepts, presented what they learned about CS this semester in a day-long showcase that featured over 150 projects made by over 600 students. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dorf, Mary Lou  Gibson, Jeremy  Undergraduate Students  

Your House Is Your Next Fit Band

This article in Discovery highlights a Wi-Fi based approach to a local area fitness monitoring system prototyped at MIT. It includes commentary by U-M Prof. Fu, who sees potential for the system, especially in cases where typical sensor placement is not viable. He does, however, have concerns about WiFi security for medical data transmission. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-ACAL  Medical Device Security  Security (Computing)  

Winter 2015 Games Showcase Brings Lively Crowd to Tishman Hall

On Friday, April 24th, Tishman Hall in the Beyster Building had a lively crowd of over 100 attendees for the 2015 Computer Games Showcase. The event showcased the final projects of computer science seniors in EECS 494, Computer Game Design and Development, which is taught by Jeremy Gibson. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Games  Gibson, Jeremy  

Prize Winning Class Team Project for Improved Image Processing

An interdisciplinary team of three graduate students earned prizes in the graduate level course, EECS 556: Image Processing, thanks to the sponsorship of Apple. The course, taught by Prof. Jeff Fessler, covers the theory and application of digital image processing, which has applications in biomedical images, time-varying imagery, robotics, and optics. [Full Story]

Students Show off Projects during Winter Semester Showcases

A number of CS students finished the semester strong by displaying their projects during the winter semester project showcases. Students, professors, and parents were able to see a combination of hard work, creativity, and skill during the ENG 100, EECS 183, EECS 373, EECS 467, and EECS 494 project showcases. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Programming  Undergraduate Students  

New Undergraduate Program in Data Science Announced

CoE students have a new major course of study to choose from, and it's a highly relevant choice in this age of "Big Data." The program in Data Science, developed in conjunction with the Statistics Department, will help to prepare a class of experts who can extract actionable data from text, audio, video, and sensor measurements. The program will be offered for the first time in the Fall of 2015. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  

Digital democracy: will 2015 be the last paper-based general election?

There is a growing call for on-line voting in the UK with Estonia's system seen by some as a model, as discussed in this article in The Telegraph. However, work by Prof. J. Alex Halderman and others, including Halderman's 2014 assessment of the Estonian systems, point to major risks in the system [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

US hospitals to treat medical device malware with AC power probes

This article in The Register highlights plans for testing in two hospitals of a system that can detect malware infections on medical equipment by monitoring AC power consumption. Former CSE postdoc Denis Foo Kune developed the technology, called WattsUpDoc, with Prof. Kevin Fu and others while at Michigan. They have commercialized it through their startup, Virta Labs. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-ACAL  Medical Device Security  

13 Of 2015s Hottest Topics In Computer Science Research

In this contributed piece on Forbes, Prof. Igor Markov presents his view of where computer science research will be focused in the near term. It's a list worth reviewing! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-ACAL  Markov, Igor  

Shift Collaborative: Providing Creative Space and Community for Tech Students with Business on the Brain

Located in a house just off U-Ms campus, Shift Collaborative is home to a student group that exists to nurture and facilitate its members fresh and creative ideas for new applications, programs, products, or startup businesses. Originally the brainchild of U-M alumnae Nancy Chow and backed by funding from former University of Michigan and NFL football player Dhani Jones, Shift Collaborative was founded in the fall of 2013. [Full Story]

At 50 Years Old, The Challenge To Keep Up With Moores Law

NPRs All Tech Considered: Fifty years ago this week, a chemist in what is now Silicon Valley published a paper that set the groundwork for the digital revolution. That man was Gordon Moore. Moores Law is all about electronic miniaturization, and the article talks about the worlds smallest computer, the Michigan Micro Mote, currently on display at the Computer History Museum. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Dutta, Prabal  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-ACAL  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  Wentzloff, David  

Eta Kappa Nu Awards Professors of the Year at St. Georges Day Feast

In an afternoon of food and fun, the annual department St. George's Day Feast provided a welcome break for students in their last week of class. As part of the event, two professors were chosen as 2014-2015 HKN Professors of the year by U-M Eta Kappa Nu, the local chapter of the national honor society for electrical and computer engineers. Prof. David Wentzloff, Associate Professor in ECE, and David Paoletti, lecturer in CSE, were chosen based on student input. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Undergraduate Students  

Advancing Computation: 4th U-M Alum Wins Turing Award

With the recent announcement of Michigan alumnus Michael Stonebraker as the 2014 Turing recipient, we'd like to recognize Stonebraker and three other Michigan alumni Frances Allen, Edgar Codd, and Stephen Cook who are recipients of this honor, extending a legacy of impact by Michigan alumni on the field of computing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Future Scientists Tour CSE

On Friday, April 10th, CSE Professors Valeria Bertacco and Todd Austin hosted a CSE visit for the preschoolers of U-Ms Towsley Childrens House. The event was a way for the children to experience computer science in a fun and engaging way. The day started with a meet and greet from Prof. Edwin Olson through his TeleRobot. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Bertacco, Valeria  

Thomas Chen Earns NSF Fellowship for Research in Artificial Neural Networks for Computer Vision

Thomas Chen has been awarded an NSF Fellowship to pursue his research in the design of efficient artificial neural networks for computer vision. Thomas and his group were able to design custom hardware architectures for efficient and high-performance implementations of a sparse coding algorithm called the sparse and independent local network (SAILnet). [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Vision  Graduate Students  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Zhang, Zhengya  

ECE Welcomes New Engineering Robotics Center

A $54M robotics center is coming to North Campus. It will offer state-of-the-art facilities in a brand-new, 3-story, 100,000 square foot building. ECE faculty are excited at the promise the new space offers for increased collaboration and synergy of effort. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Corso, Jason  Cyber-physical systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Software Systems  Lafortune, Stephane  Ozay, Necmiye  Revzen, Shai  Robotics and Computer Vision  Teneketzis, Demosthenis  

CS Students Sweep Awards at 2015 Mobile Apps Challenge

Computer science students dominated the awards for the 2015 U-M Mobile Apps Challenge, which is open to students, faculty, and staff campus-wide. First place went to freshman Janum Trivedi, who will be declaring in CS soon. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Mobile Computing  Undergraduate Students  

Elaine Wah Receives CoE Marian Sarah Parker Prize

Elaine Wah, a CSE PhD candidate, has been awarded a CoE Marian Sarah Parker Prize. The award is given to an outstanding woman graduate student who has demonstrated academic excellence, leadership qualities and outstanding contributions to the University and/or community. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Women in Computing  

The Crazy-Tiny Next Generation of Computers

This article in Medium describes Prof. Prabal Dutta's interest in Smart Dust - a network of tiny, sensor-enabled autonomous computers - and its ability to to measure everyday data to solve issues of critical sustainability. It traces how he began collaborating with Profs. David Blaauw and Dennis Sylvester on the development of the Michigan Micro Mote (M3), which is now the world's smallest and first millimeter scale computer. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Dutta, Prabal  Internet of Things  Lab-ACAL  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  

Duo Security Raises $30 Million To Protect Enterprises Against Data Breaches

Ann Arbor-based Duo Security, the two-factor authentication startup founded by CS alums Dug Song and Jon Oberheide, wants to do more to help protect companies from hackers trying to gain access to their networks. With that goal in mind, its launching a new product to secure their networks and announcing $30 million in new funding led by Redpoint Ventures. More in this article on Techcrunch. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Security (Computing)  

Creativity in the Classroom: Gibson Puts Emphasis on Collaborative Learning and Quick Prototyping in Games MDE

Many forward thinking educators are flipping the tables on their students by diverging from the standard classroom lecture format and implementing innovative curriculum in order to enhance student experience and stimulate learning. In his EECS 494 Computer Game Design and Development course, instructor Jeremy Gibson has done just that, and the results are promising. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Games  Game Design and Development  Gibson, Jeremy  

Machine politics: Electronic voting and the persistent doubts about its integrity

Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his collaborator Dr. Vanessa Teague are interviewed on Up Close, the research talk show from the University of Melbourne, about their work in investigating the iVote system recently used in New South Wales and about the security challenges of electronic voting in general. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

OpenSource.com: A case for predictable databases

Prof. Barzan Mozafari is interviewed in this Q&A on OpenSource.com about his open source DBSeer and DBSherlock database tools, and about guaranteeing a consistent and predictable level of performance is cloud-based database systems [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Lab-Software Systems  Mozafari, Barzan  

Mobile Friendly - apps to improve life

Prof. Jasprit Singh believes mobile apps can help change lives for the better, and he's built platform technology to help make it happen. Singh and his colleague John Hinckley have consulted with a number of U-M researchers on the development of mobile apps, and by creating a general platform, they can reduce costs and turnaround time. Singh helped Prof. Daniel Eisenberg build Tinyshifts, an app that actively prompts users to answer questions about their mental health issues. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Mobile Computing  Singh, Jasprit  

Elaine Wah Receives Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship for Research on Algorithmic Trading

Elaine Wah, a CSE PhD candidate, has been awarded a Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to support her research on algorithmic trading, or the use of automated computer algorithms to submit orders to buy or sell, in financial markets. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Women in Computing  

Karl Winsor Honored with Goldwater Scholarship

Honors Mathematics and Computer Science undergraduate student Karl Winsor has been named a Goldwater Scholar for the 2015-16 academic year. This program provides scholarships to students interested in careers in science, math, and engineering, and they are considered the premier scholarships awarded to undergraduates in these fields. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Theory of Computation  Undergraduate Students  

ECEs Ideas Worth Spreading - TEDxUofM

TEDxUofM welcomed two speakers from ECE to its stage to "give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes or less." Profs. Shai Revzen and Herbert Winful spoke about their passion for their work at the sixth annual conference, themed "Constructive Interference." Prof. Winful's talk was titled "How Hidden Passions Can Connect People," and Prof. Revzen's talk was titled "Facing the Unknown, With Robots." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lab-Systems  Revzen, Shai  Winful, Herbert  

This is the worlds smallest computer

CBS News did a video and story about the Michigan Micro Mote (M3), which is the world's smallest computer and the world's first millimeter scale computer. "As the Internet of Things (IoT) gets bigger, the Michigan team is pushing to make computers ever smaller." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Internet of Things  Lab-ACAL  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  

Seattle Alumni Connect and Celebrate at ECE Networking Event

ECE Alumni of the greater Seattle area gathered for a networking dinner at the World Trade Center on March 19, 2015. The event, sponsored by ECE Alumni Babak Parviz (Amazon) and Dawson Yee (Microsoft), was the first time many alumni in the area had a chance to meet. The evening was such a success, plans are already underway for a follow-up event, in Seattle and around the country. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Why you arent voting for Chicago mayor from a smartphone

This article in the Chicago Tribune summarizes why Chicago voters won't be casting online votes in April 7's mayoral runoff election. Although other transactions can be accomplished by smartphone, "the shape of the problem is fundamentally different than things we routinely do online today," says Prof. J. Alex Halderman in the article. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

The Hackathon Fast Track, From Campus to Silicon Valley

This article in the New York Times examines the phenomenon of hackathons and how they have become a new fast track to success in the tech industry. Quoted are CS major and director of the past two MHacks, Vikram Rajagopalan, as well as David Fontenot, a former MHacks director. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

Elnaz Ansari Earns Towner Prize for Distinguished Academic Achievement

Elnaz Ansari, PhD candidate in EE, has received the Richard F. and Eleanor A. Towner Prize for Distinguished Academic Achievement. Elnaz implements large-scale analog circuits using automatic design techniques that are mostly used in digital system designs. Using these techniques, she has fabricated a high-speed, high-resolution digital to analog converter (DAC) in 65nm CMOS technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Wentzloff, David  

Students Getting Ready to Race with MHybrid

The Michigan Hybrid Racing Team (MHybrid) unveiled their new formula racecar, and students are hard at work to make the car a success at the Formula Hybrid Competition at Dartmouth on April 27. The car will be tested on its speed, design, and efficiency. The team will take a number of design improvements over previous models to the track, and the electrical group has been busy making them happen. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Worlds Largest Processor Announced; Perfect for Big Data and Other Applications

Computer architecture researchers in the Computer Science and Engineering division of the EECS Department at the University of Michigan have announced a new paradigm in the evolution of computer development: the worlds largest processor chip, designed for big data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-ACAL  

Smart Phone Apps: An Interview with Prof. Georg Essl (in German)

Prof. Georg Essl is interviewed on German public radio (WDR) on the subject of smart phone apps and their potential as musical instruments. The interview includes numerous musical examples from Essl's Michigan Mobile Phone Ensemble. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Essl, Georg  Lab-Interactive Systems  Michigan Mobile Phone Ensemble  Mobile Computing  

Our Data, Our Health. A Future Tense Event Recap.

This blog posting on Slate addresses threats to medical device security and highlights the thoughts of Prof. Kevin Fu on the matter. Prof. Fu directs the Archimedes Medical Device Research Center at Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-ACAL  Medical Device Security  Security (Computing)  

Mastering Illusions Of The Mind

Many students say they went into electrical engineering because the things that engineers do is like magic. One of our alumni, Oz Pearlman, actually became a magician. He followed his passion after spending a few years at Merrill Lynch, honing his craft on the side. He is now a a renowned mentalist who has performed across 6 continents and over 30 countries. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Probing the Whole Internet for Weak Spots

This article in MIT Technology Review profiles the work of CSE graduate student Zakir Durumeric. Durumeric led in the development of ZMap, the software capable of probing the entire public Internet in less than an hour. Through the use of ZMap, Durumeric was first person to realize the scope of the FREAK flaw. His use of ZMap was also pivotal to researchers' understanding of the recent Heartbleed flaw. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

ECE spinoff Arborlight gets $1.7M in VC funding to commercialize new lighting technology

"Arborlight wants every indoor space to be able to reap the benefits of natural -- or as close to natural -- sunlight, and thanks to a $1.7 million venture capital investment, the company is one step closer to that goal." Arborlight is co-founded by Prof. P.C. Ku. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Ku, Pei-Cheng (P.C.)  Technology Transfer  

Jason Davis: Ph.D. candidate confident yet cautious of future

Crain's Business Detroit sat down with Millennial and ECE staff member Jason Davis to hear how things were going in his life and career. Jason is working as the Alumni Relations Coordinator while pursuing his doctorate in higher education. His passion is issues of diversity and inclusion, something he brings to his work. He is also a regular volunteer for a variety of organizations. [Full Story]

ECE Students Earn CoE Distinguished Leadership Awards

Three ECE students have been awarded the CoE Distinguished Leadership Award. This award recognizes students who have demonstrated outstanding leadership and service to the College, University, and community. Cheng Zhang and Elizabeth Dreyer are both Ph.D. students in electrical engineering, and Lauren Bilbo is an undergraduate senior majoring in electrical engineering. All three are actively involved in student organizations and leadership positions. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Guo, L. Jay  Rand, Stephen  Undergraduate Students  

Stephen Forrest Receives 2015 Distinguished University Innovator Award

Stephen Forrest, Paul G. Goebel Professor of Engineering, has been awarded the 2015 U-M Distinguished University Innovator Award. Prof. Forrest is widely acknowledged as one of the most successful academic inventors and entrepreneurs today. He has participated in the founding of 5 companies which have generated more than 1,000 jobs, holds 271 patents, and published more than 540 papers which have received more than 85,000 citations in Google Scholar. During his tenure as U-M's Vice President for Research, he was responsible for several key initiatives that helped make Michigan a leader in tech transfer. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

U-M Develops Controls for Bipedal Robots with Model-Based Design

Developing a two-legged robot capable of walking and running like a human is a key goal for robotics researchers. In 2011, Professor Jessy Grizzle and a small team of Ph.D. students advanced toward that goal with MABEL, a bipedal robot that could run a nine-minute mile and regain its balance after negotiating an eight-inch step. When MABEL's successor, MARLO, needed new coding, the researchers moved away from hand-coding, and used Model-Based Design with MATLAB and Simulink to speed up the development of real-time control systems for MARLO and other bipedal robots. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Michael Stonebraker Receives ACM Turing Award

Michael Stonebraker (MS EE '66, PhD CICE '71) has been named the recipient of the 2014 ACM A.M. Turing Award for fundamental contributions to the concepts and practices underlying modern database systems. The ACM Turing Award, widely considered the Nobel Prize of Computing, carries a $1 million prize with financial support provided by Google, Inc. It is named for Alan M. Turing, the British mathematician who articulated the mathematical foundation and limits of computing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Voice Control Will Force an Overhaul of the Whole Internet

This article in Wired reports on Sirius, the open-source personal digital assistant released by Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang and graduate student Johann Hauswald. It focused in in the projects underlying thrust: that the data centers of today are not built to accommodate the voice-based data loads of tomorrow. Sirius is a tool that will help researchers to understand the needs of next-generation data centers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Computer Architecture  Data Centers  Lab-ACAL  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Cheng Zhang Awarded Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship for Research on Nanophotonic Materials and Devices

Cheng Zhang, a 5th year Ph.D. student in Electrical Engineering, has been awarded a Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to support his doctoral research in new optical materials and device concepts for future optoelectronic devices. Key to one facet of Cheng's research is his investigation of a new kind of silver film, aluminum-doped silver (Al-doped Ag), for device fabrication. In addition, Cheng is investigating nano-size metamaterials for use in optical spectrum filtering and polarization/direction control. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Grbic, Anthony  Guo, L. Jay  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Norris, Theodore B.  Optics and Photonics  Optoelectronics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Thousands of NSW iVotes open to FREAK flaw

This article in The Australian covers the discovery of a security flaw in the the online voting system used in New South Wales during the current election. The researchers included Prof. J. Alex Halderman and Dr. Vanessa Teague of the University of Melbourne. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Critical iVote security flaws expose risk of online voting fraud

This article in CNet covers the discovery of a security flaw in the the online voting system used in New South Wales during the current election. The researchers included Prof. J. Alex Halderman and Dr. Vanessa Teague of the University of Melbourne. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy