Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

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Clever Tool Shields Your Car From Hacks by Watching its Internal Clocks

In a paper they plan to present at the Usenix security conference next month, researchers led by Kang G. Shin, the Kevin and Nancy O'Connor Professor of Computer Science, describe an easy-to-assemble tool they call the Clock-based Intrusion Detection System, or CIDS. CIDS characterizes the clock inaccuracies of all of the processors in a car in order to spot the malicious messages that hackers use to take control of vehicle components like brakes and transmission. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Automotive industry  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Shin, Kang G.  

Tracking and Mitigating Tail Latency in Data Centers

Computer science researchers have developed a modular load tester platform for data centers which is designed to help measure and mitigate tail latency. Called Treadmill, it is described in their paper, "Treadmill: Attributing the Source of Tail Latency through Precise Load Testing and Statistical Inference." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Artificial Intelligence  Big Data  Computer Architecture  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Two Michigan Papers Win Top Awards at IEEE Security and Privacy Symposium

Two papers authored by EECS researchers were selected for top honors at the 37th IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy. One of the papers, describing and demonstrating a malicious hardware backdoor, received the Distinguished Paper Award. The second, which demonstrated security failings in a commercial smart home platform, received the Distinguished Practical Paper Award. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Computer Architecture  Graduate Students  Hicks, Matt  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Prakash, Atul  Security (Computing)  Sylvester, Dennis  

This "Demonically Clever" Backdoor Hides in a Tiny Slice of a Computer Chip

This article in Wired describes work by Michigan researchers that demonstrates how a hacker could hide a malicious backdoor in silicon and trigger it to gain access to a computing system. Google engineer Yonatan Zunger is quoted as saying "This is the most demonically clever computer security attack Ive seen in years." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Blaauw, David  Computer Architecture  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Undetectable proof-of-concept chip poisoning uses analog circuits to escalate privilege

In this article, Cory Doctorow describes work by Michigan researchers that demonstrates a "novel, frightening attack on the integrity of microprocessors." The paper describes the attack, which is nearly undetectable, and how it can lead to full control of a computing system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Blaauw, David  Computer Architecture  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Two Papers by Michigan Researchers Chosen as IEEE Micro Top Picks

Two papers authored by EECS researchers have been selected for IEEE Micro's Top Picks from the 2015 Computer Architecture Conferences. The two papers from Michigan introduced the Sirius personal digital assistant and the MBus bus for modular microcomputing systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Computer Architecture  Dreslinski, Ron  Dutta, Prabal  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Mudge, Trevor  Tang, Lingjia