Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

CSE News

Michael Stonebraker Receives ACM Turing Award

Michael Stonebraker (MS EE '66, PhD CICE '71) has been named the recipient of the 2014 ACM A.M. Turing Award for fundamental contributions to the concepts and practices underlying modern database systems. The ACM Turing Award, widely considered the Nobel Prize of Computing, carries a $1 million prize with financial support provided by Google, Inc. It is named for Alan M. Turing, the British mathematician who articulated the mathematical foundation and limits of computing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Voice Control Will Force an Overhaul of the Whole Internet

This article in Wired reports on Sirius, the open-source personal digital assistant released by Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang and graduate student Johann Hauswald. It focused in in the projects underlying thrust: that the data centers of today are not built to accommodate the voice-based data loads of tomorrow. Sirius is a tool that will help researchers to understand the needs of next-generation data centers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Computer Architecture  Data Centers  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Thousands of NSW iVotes open to FREAK flaw

This article in The Australian covers the discovery of a security flaw in the the online voting system used in New South Wales during the current election. The researchers included Prof. J. Alex Halderman and Dr. Vanessa Teague of the University of Melbourne. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Critical iVote security flaws expose risk of online voting fraud

This article in CNet covers the discovery of a security flaw in the the online voting system used in New South Wales during the current election. The researchers included Prof. J. Alex Halderman and Dr. Vanessa Teague of the University of Melbourne. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  

Australian online voting system may have FREAK bug

This article in The Register covers the discovery of a security flaw in the the online voting system used in New South Wales during the current election. The researchers included Prof. J. Alex Halderman and Dr. Vanessa Teague of the University of Melbourne. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

NSW election result could be challenged over iVote security flaw

This article in The Guardian covers the discovery of a security flaw in the the online voting system used in New South Wales during the current election. The researchers included Prof. J. Alex Halderman and Dr. Vanessa Teague of the University of Melbourne. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Security Flaw in New South Wales Puts Thousands of Online Votes at Risk

A security flaw detected by Prof. J. Alex Halderman and Dr. Vanessa Teague of the University of Melborne may have exposed thousands of votes to manipulation during a six-day period of online voting in New South Wales, Australia. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Fall 2015: EECS 498: Control of Manufacturing Systems

Course No.: EECS 498-001
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Semyon Meerkov
Prerequisites: Elementary probability theory

Course Description:
Manufacturing is a major source of national wealth. Losing manufacturing, a country is losing its wealth. Until recently, methods of design and control of manufacturing systems has been based on "weak" engineering - experience, common sense, and, in some cases, simulations. Efficient manufacturing requires more: rigorous analytical methods. Such methods have emerged during the last 25 years. The results obtained, with emphasis on control and management, will be discussed in the course.

The course is directed towards undergraduate students from all CoE departments interested in careers involving design/manufacturing of products, e.g. automobiles, aircraft, semiconductors, computer/communication devices, etc. The skill acquired should make the students knowledgable in various facets of manufacturing and marketable as engineering managers of manufacturing operations. [More Info]

Edwin Olson: Driverless Cars (radio interview)

In this radio interview on Newstalk ZB in New Zealand, Prof. Edwin Olson discusses the future of autonomous vehicles, how autonomy might be introduced into the marketplace, and M City, the automated test track for autonomous vehicle research and testing at Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Michigan Micro Mote (M3) Makes History

Michigan Micro Mote (M3), the worlds smallest computer, is taking its place among other revolutionary accomplishments in the history of computing at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA. Measuring in at less than a half a centimeter, it is a fully autonomous computing system that acts as a smart sensing system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Dutta, Prabal  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sensors  Sylvester, Dennis  Wentzloff, David  

2015 CoE Towner Prize for Outstanding Graduate Student Instructors

Each year the College of Engineering awards the Towner Prize for Outstanding Graduate Student Instructors (GSIs) to the top graduate student instructors throughout the College of Engineering. In 2015, three of the four awards went to students in EECS. The winners are Jonathan Beaumont, Michael Benson, and Mai Le. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

EECS Undergraduate Student Awards

Students, parents, and faculty gathered on Friday, March 13, 2015 to celebrate the achievements of EECS students who earned special awards for academic achievement, research, service, or entrepreneurial activities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

Researchers just built a free, open-source version of Siri

This article in VentureBeat reports on Sirius, the open-source intelligent personal assistant software introduced by CSE Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang, along with graduate student Johann Hauswald. It focuses on the open-source nature of Sirius and quotes the researchers regarding its possibilities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Computer Architecture  Data Centers  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Engineers Bring A New Open-Source Siri To Life

This article in readwrite reports on Sirius, the open-source intelligent personal assistant software introduced by CSE Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang, along with graduate student Johann Hauswald. It focuses in part on the open-source nature of Sirius and the potential that creates for anyone to create a customized personal assistant. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Computer Architecture  Data Centers  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Free Sirius One-Ups Siri

This article in EE Times reports on Sirius, the open-source intelligent personal assistant software introduced by CSE Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang, along with graduate student Johann Hauswald. The article focuses in part on Sirius's ability to process photos. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Computer Architecture  Data Centers  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

What You Tweet Might Tell Janet Yellen Its Time to Raise Rates

Economists at the Fed are looking into whether non-traditional data could improve the accuracy and timeliness of the forecasts they put before monetary-policy decision makers about every six weeks. This could include Prof. Mike Cafarella's social media tool that monitors tweets to create an index of initial claims for unemployment. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Cafarella, Michael  Lab-Software Systems  Social Media  

Scott Mahlke Receives Micro Test of Time Award

CSE Associate Chair Scott Mahlke has been recognized with a Micro Test of Time Award for his groundbreaking 1992 paper on the hyperblock, a structure for improving the efficiency of code execution on superscalar and related processors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Mahlke, Scott  

Sirius Is the Google-Backed Open Source Siri

This article in Motherboard discusses Sirius, the open-source digital assistant developed by CSE researchers, its ability to process images, its open-source roots, and ultimately reflects on its utility versus a past attempt in this realm. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Computer Architecture  Data Centers  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Build Your Own Siri: An Open-Source Digital Assistant

CSE researchers have introduced Sirius, an open-source computing system designed to spark a new generation of intelligent personal assistants for wearables and other devices. Core functionalities include speech recognition, image matching, natural language processing, and a Q&A system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Computer Architecture  Data Centers  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Emily Mower Provost Receives Oscar Stern Award for Research in Emotion Expression and Perception

Assistant Professor Emily Mower Provost has been awarded the 2015 Oscar Stern Award for Depression Research. The award will support her research into how variation in mood affects variation in emotion perception using stimuli developed at UM. The intent of the award is to promote high impact, innovative ideas leading to strategic interventions to prevent or manage mood disorders. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Interactive Systems  Mower Provost, Emily  Women in Computing  

Chappie ponders future of humans in a world run on artificial intelligence

Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja is quoted in this article in The Washington Times on the emergence of artificial intelligence and the need for controls to be established before AI can operate independently of human oversight. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Security Concerns Raised Regarding Clinton Offices Use of Private Email

Prof. J. Alex Halderman is quoted regarding security concerns in this Al Jazeera America article on Hillary Clinton's use of a private email service while in office as Secretary of State. Prof. Halderman has previously demonstrated vulnerabilities in the security of a number of trusted systems, including airport body scanners and electronic voting systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Outdated Encryption Keys Leave Phones Vulnerable to Hackers

Prof. J. Alex Halderman and CSE graduate student Zakir Durumeric have used their ZMap scanning software to determine that of the 14 million web sites worldwide that offer encryption, more than 5 million remain vulnerable to the FREAK encryption flaw as of March 4. Prof. Halderman is quoted on the danger of weak crypto and "back doors" in this New York Times article on the subject. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Researchers Map Extent of FREAK Security Flaw

Prof. J. Alex Halderman and CSE graduate student Zakir Durumeric have used their ZMap scanning software to determine that of the 14 million web sites worldwide that offer encryption, more than 5 million remain vulnerable to the FREAK encryption flaw as of March 4. The U-M researchers are part of a broad effort that has demonstrated the dangers inherent in the older 512-bit encryption code that is still in use. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Alumnus Erin Teague Listed Among 25 Women to Know in 2015

Erin Teague (BSE CE '04) was listed in Rolling Out Magazine as one of the top 25 woman we should know in 2015. Erin is the director of product management at Yahoo! The article, part of a celebration of International Women's History Month, describes the barriers she's broken in the industry. Previously, she was named among the 100 Coolest People in Tech by Business Insider. (Check out a previous Q&A with Erin for more in-depth info here.) [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Diversity and Outreach  

Z. Morley Mao Receives Google Faculty Research Award

Associate Professor Z. Morley Mao has been awarded a 2015 Google Faculty Research Award for her work entitled, "Enabling Cross-layer Visibility for Mobile Apps: Performance and Energy Efficiency Diagnosis". Mao's goal was to create a diagnosis tool to achieve responsive and energy-efficient mobile apps that work well in diverse network conditions. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Women in Computing  

Dutta and Halderman Named Morris Wellman Faculty Development Professors

Prabal Dutta and J. Alex Halderman, assistant professors in Computer Science and Engineering, have been named Morris Wellman Faculty Development Professors. The professorship is awarded to junior faculty members in recognition of outstanding contributions to teaching and research. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dutta, Prabal  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Lab-Software Systems  

Prabal Dutta Selected for Sloan Research Fellowship

Professor Prabal Dutta has been selected for a Sloan Research Fellowship for his work in developing energy-scavenging sensors and wireless communications, mobile-sensor-interfaces, and "Smart Dust" system architecture. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Dutta, Prabal  Internet of Things  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Sensors  

J. Alex Halderman Selected for Sloan Research Fellowship

Professor J. Alex Halderman has been selected for a Sloan Research Fellowship for his work in the science of computer and network security with an emphasis on problems that broadly impact society and public policy. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cryptography  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

HiJack Enables a Smartphone Dongle for Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases

HiJack, the hardware/software platform that was developed by Prof. Prabal Dutta and his students five years ago, has opened the door to new technology. Recently, a team of researchers from Columbia University developed an HIV and syphilis point of care test that detects the diseases within 15 minutes after a fingerprick of blood. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Dutta, Prabal  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Mobile Computing  Sensors  

Jacob Abernethy Receives NSF CAREER Award

Prof. Jacob Abernethy has received an NSF CAREER Award for his research project, "CAREER: Machine Learning through the Lens of Economics (And Vice Versa)," to investigate the relationship between machine learning and microeconomic theory. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Abernethy, Jake  Artificial Intelligence  Economic Systems  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  

Grant Schoenebeck Receives NSF CAREER Award

Prof. Grant Schoenebeck has received an NSF CAREER Award for his research project, "CAREER: Social Networks Processes, Structures, and Algorithms," to develop a rigorous theoretical understanding of complex networks. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Theory of Computation  Schoenebeck, Grant  Social Media  Theory  

Jason Corso Receives Google Faculty Research Award

Prof. Jason Corso received a 2015 Google Faculty Research Award to further his research in computational learning from instructional video content. His goal is to develop a consistent and reliable method for producing a visual and textual summary of any video that describes a process - from simple sandwich how-to's to more elaborate technical processes. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Computer Vision  Corso, Jason  Lab-Systems  Machine Learning  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Jia Deng Receives Google Faculty Research Award

Assistant Professor Jia Deng has been awarded a 2015 Google Faculty Research Award for his work in large-scale image understanding. The Google Faculty Research Awards program is a competitive worldwide program intended to facilitate more interaction between Google and academia. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Deng, Jia  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Robotics and Computer Vision  

CSE Sponsors Michigan Celebration of Women in Computing Conference to be Hosted by U-M

The University of Michigan will host the 5th biennial Michigan Celebration of Women in Computing conference. The conference, which is also sponsored by CSE, will take place at the Duderstadt Center March 20-21st, 2015 and registration is now open. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Women in Computing  

Careers in Robotics: Spotlight on the University of Michigan

This article in Robotics Business Review takes a look at robotics research at Michigan, in particular the work in perception and autonomy that is being conducted by Profs. Edwin Olson and Ryan Eustice. It also examines how that research is a key ingredient in the work to be done on autonomous vehicles at Michigan's new Mobility Transportation Center. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  Robotics and Computer Vision  

Former CSE Chair Farnam Jahanian Named Provost at Carnegie Mellon University

Farnam Jahanian, former chair of CSE and most recently vice president of research at Carnegie Mellon University, has been appointed as CMU's provost. Jahanian was on the faculty at the U-M from 1993 to 2014 and served as chair for CSE at U-M from 2007 to 2011. [Full Story]

Two Faculty Open Door for Collaboration with Ethiopian Institute

Profs. Todd Austin and Valeria Bertacco visited Addis Ababa Institute of Technology in Ethiopia in 2009 to talk about Michigan Engineering. They found great enthusiasm but scant resources. By 2011, they were donating equipment for labs and in 2012 built curriculum and taught during sabbatical. A broader initiative between U-M and AAIT now exists, and Austin and Bertacco were part of a recent U-M delegation to AAIT. That trip, and a look at Ethiopia, is the subject of this Digital Multimedia Experience. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Bertacco, Valeria  Diversity and Outreach  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  

Prof. Emerita Lynn Conway to Advise Open-Access CS Journal

Lynn Conway, Prof. Emerita of EECS, will serve on the advisory board for a new open-access journal by PeerJ, called PeerJ Computer Science. (What is an open-access journal? Watch this comic video) The peer-reviewed web journal previously considered articles in the biological and medial sciences, making this its first expansion into a new field since its founding in 2012. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Conway, Lynn  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  

HKN Students Crowned Mr. and Ms. Engineer at the The Engineering Games

This years Engineering Games, hosted by SWE (Society of Women Engineers), pitted teams from six engineering student organizations in a clash of talent, skill, and problem solving. Representing HKN (Eta Kappa Nu), the international honor society for Electrical and Computer Engineers, ECE graduate student David Hiskens and CS senior Alyssa Kornylo took home the Mr. and Ms. Engineering crowns. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Undergraduate Students  

Cooking robot may offer artificial culinary intelligence

Prof. Jason Corso was asked to comment on research that involved the use of artificial intelligence to provide robots with the ability to recognize objects and learn actions by watching humans. In this case, the robot was watching a video. He said it is possible to reconstruct the 3D environment (2D space plus time) that is being shown in the video. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Corso, Jason  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Coding For Kids: Teaching Girls, Minorities To Program Important For A Diverse Tech Workforce

This story on the International Business Times website speaks about creating a new generation of programmers by reaching out to demographics that historically haven't considered coding as a profession. In it, Prof. Elliot Soloway says, "Coding is about giving kids the new pencil and paper, it's giving them the new typewriter, the new tool to say things that they couldn't say before." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Interactive Systems  Programming  Soloway, Elliot  

MHacks Continues to Impress with Over 1200 Participants at Hackathon

Since its inception in February 2013, MHacks, the university's semi-annual event that helped spark the nation's college hackathon movement, has grown from a just-for-fun challenge to a sophisticated operation that draws big sponsors and students from a variety of backgrounds. Hacks have gone from short-term creations to impressive longer-term ventures. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hacks  

Helen Hagos, CSE Masters Student, Selected for Dow Sustainability Fellowship

Helen Hagos has been selected for a Dow Sustainability Fellowship for her work in the design of embedded systems for use in differentiated waste collection and management. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Sustainability  Women in Computing  

CSE Graduate Student Develops Lower-Cost Self-Driving Car Navigation System

CSE graduate student Ryan Wolcott has developed a navigation system for autonomous vehicles that leverages game technology and which could eliminate the need for expensive laser-scanning sensor systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles   Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Four CSE Faculty Selected for College of Engineering Awards

Four CSE faculty have been selected for 2014-15 College of Engineering Awards in recognition of their outstanding contributions to research and education: Todd Austin, Ronald Dreslinski, J. Alex Halderman, and Edwin Olson. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Dreslinski, Ron  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Advanced Computer Architecture  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Three Faculty Selected for 2015 EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards

The EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards are presented annually to faculty members for their outstanding accomplishments in teaching, research, and service. The recipients of the 2015 EECS Outstanding Achievement Award are Benjamin Kuipers, Stephen Rand, and David Wentzloff. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kuipers, Benjamin  Rand, Stephen  Wentzloff, David  

Career Center Report Shows Computer Scientists Highly Sought, Best Compensated

The Engineering Career Resource Center has issued its Annual Report, which includes reported placement and salary survey data for College of Engineering students. By most measures, CS students and grads are the most sought and best compensated. [Full Story]

Despite Cold Weather, CSE Community Turns Out For Science on Screen Movie & Lecture

The event took place at downtown Ann Arbor's Michigan Theater on the evening of January 8, 2015. It featured a screening of the movie, The Imitation Game, followed Prof. Kevin Compton's lecture on WWII cryptography and the life of Alan Turing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Compton, Kevin  Cryptography  Lab-Theory of Computation  

Researchers Gather at CSE for Midwest Theory Day

Computer scientists and mathematicians from across the greater midwest region gathered at CSE on December 6, 2014 for the 66th Midwest Theory Day. The event provided an opportunity for the theory community to meet up, share research findings, and initiate collaborations. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Theory of Computation  Theory  

All CSE News for 2015