Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

CSE News

Valeria Bertacco Receives U-M Sarah Goddard Power Award

Prof. Valeria Bertacco has been selected to receive a 2016 Sarah Goddard Power Award. The award is given to a University of Michigan faculty member who demonstrates an unwavering commitment to the betterment of women and who have demonstrated a clear record of success and significant achievement in research and scholarship, distinguished leadership, and mentoring women. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Jenna Wiens Receives NSF CAREER Award to Increase the Utility of Machine Learning in Clinical Care

Assistant Professor Jenna Wiens has been awarded an NSF CAREER grant for her research project, "CAREER: Adaptable, Intelligible, and Actionable Models: Increasing the Utility of Machine Learning in Clinical Care." Under this project, she will develop data-driven predictive models to transform large and diverse datasets into actionable knowledge for improved patient care. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Wiens, Jenna  

Hackers Tackle Assistive Technology

Dr. David Chesney and current computer science students are once again contributing to the development of assistive technology. On Thursday, January 28th, Chesney and his team launched Hacking for the Greater Good, a 6-hour hackathon that allowed students to work on projects that centered on assistive technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chesney, David  Hacks  Undergraduate Students  

Karl Winsor Named Churchill Scholar

Honors Mathematics and Computer Science undergraduate student Karl Winsor has been named a 2016-17 Churchill Scholar by the Winston Churchill Foundation of the United States. The award provides funding for a year of Master's study in science, mathematics, and engineering at the University of Cambridge, based at Churchill College. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

Barzan Mozafari Receives NSF CAREER Award to Improve Predictability of Database Systems

Assistant Professor Barzan Mozafari has been awarded an NSF CAREER grant for his research project, "CAREER: Designing a Predictable Database - An Overlooked Virtue." Under this project, Prof. Mozafari aims to restore the missing virtue of predictability in the design of database systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Databases  Lab-Software Systems  Mozafari, Barzan  

President Obama Announces Computer Science for All

President Obama has announced a new Computer Science for All initiative to empower all American students from kindergarten through high school to learn CS and be equipped with the computational thinking skills they need to be creators in the digital economy, not just consumers, and to be active citizens in our technology-driven world. [Full Story]

2016 EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards

The EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards are presented annually to faculty members for their outstanding accomplishments in teaching, research, and service. The recipients of the 2016 EECS Outstanding Achievement Award are Prof. Anthony Grbic, Dr. David Paoletti, Prof. Mina Rais-Zadeh, and Prof. Thomas F. Wenisch. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grbic, Anthony  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Rais-Zadeh, Mina  Wenisch, Thomas  

Internet voting is just too hackable, say security experts

This article revisits the question of Internet voting, and reviews the reasons why these systems have been proven unreliable in the past. Prof. J. Alex Halderman, a prominent researcher in this area who has demonstrated vulnerabilities in many types of electronic voting systems, is quoted: "Imagine the incentives of a rival country to come in and change the outcome of a vote for national leadership. Elections require correct outcomes and true ballot secrecy." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Driverless cars work great in sunny California. But how about in a blizzard?

This article quotes Prof. Edwin Olson regarding the research he is doing in conjunction with Ford on autonomous vehicles and their use in conditions that include snow-covered roads. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Three Michigan Universities Receive Pacesetters Awards to Attract More Women to Computer Science

The University of Michigan, Michigan Technological University, and Michigan State University have been selected for the National Center of Women and Information Technology Pacesetters program. Pacesetters is a 2-year program under which participating institutions develop aggressive and measurable goals for increasing the number of women in the US computing and technology workforce. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Dorf, Mary Lou  Women in Computing  

Jason Mars Receives NSF CAREER Award to Advance System Architectures for Artificially Intelligent Services and Applications

Assistant Professor Jason Mars has been awarded an NSF CAREER grant for his project, CAREER: Advancing the Frontier in System Architectures for Artificially Intelligent Services and Applications. The award will enable Prof. Mars to understand how future cloud and mobile systems should be designed to support increasing demand from users of intelligent assistants. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  

Secure Your Website Now: Let's Encrypt Enters Public Beta

Lets Encrypt, the free certificate authority created by Prof. J. Alex Halderman and CSE graduate student James Kasten, recently entered Public Beta, which allows anyone to request a certificate without needing an invitation. The service was created to provide an easy way for converting webservers from HTTP to HTTPS. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  

Two CSE Faculty Selected for 2015-16 College of Engineering Awards

Two CSE faculty have been recognized by the College of Engineering for their extraordinary contributions: Prof. Valeria Bertacco for service and Dr. Mary Lou Dorf for teaching. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Dorf, Mary Lou  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Lees Make Gift to Empower CSE Student Activities

Dr. Peter Lee (BS MS PhD CCS 82, 82, 87) and Susan Lee have made a $25,000 discretionary gift for student activities to CSE. With their gift, the Lees aim to provide the opportunity to support CSE students to do and achieve more. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

EECS Alumnus Leads $10M NSF Expeditions Project for Synthetic Biology

Douglas Densmore (BSE CE 01), Associate Prof. of ECE at Boston University, will lead the Living Computing Project, an effort to create a toolbox of catalogued biological parts that can be used to engineer organisms with predictable results. These parts will allow the entire field to understand better what computing principles can be applied repeatedly and reliably to synthetic biology. The project is funded under a $10 million National Science Foundation (NSF) "Expeditions in Computing" grant. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Nadkarni Gift Invests in Student Entrepreneurs

Shirish Nadkarni (BSE EE 82) and his wife Manisha Nadkarni, of Medina, Washington, have made an expendable gift to be used at the discretion of the chair of the CSE Division. Its purpose is to support student teams in junior/senior-level project-oriented courses in CSE in which students develop software and hardware prototypes, many of which have commercial potential. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Even your academic advisor might one day be a robot

This article in Engadget highlights the new research collaboration between Michigan and IBM, which is aimed at building a conversationally-driven, artificially intelligent academic advisor that guides undergraduate students through their course options [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

U-M, IBM Partner on Advanced Conversational Computing System

The University of Michigan and IBM have launched a $4.5 million collaboration to develop a new class of conversational technologies that will enable people to interact more naturally and effectively with computers. Under the project, the researchers will develop a cognitive system that functions as an academic advisor for undergraduate computer science and engineering majors at the university. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lasecki, Walter  Lee, Honglak  Mars, Jason  Mihalcea, Rada  Mower Provost, Emily  Radev, Dragomir  Tang, Lingjia  

Cafarella and Lee Named Morris Wellman Faculty Development Professors

Michael Cafarella and Honglak Lee, assistant professors in Computer Science and Engineering, have been named Morris Wellman Faculty Development Professors. The professorship is awarded to junior faculty members in recognition of outstanding contributions to teaching and research. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cafarella, Michael  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Software Systems  Lee, Honglak  

Kevin Fu Named a Top Influencer in Health Information Security

Prof. Kevin Fu has been named to the 2016 list of Top Influencers in Healthcare Information Security by HealthcareInfoSecurity. This list recognizes leaders who are playing significant roles in shaping the way healthcare organizations approach information security and privacy. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Software Systems  Medical Device Security  Security (Computing)  

Censys Enables Fast Searching of Actionable Internet Data

CSE researchers have introduced Censys, a search engine that enables researchers to ask questions about the hosts and networks that compose the Internet and get an immediate reply. Censys builds on past work at Michigan that produced the first fast Internet-wide scanner, ZMap. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Networks and Networking  Security (Computing)  

The Story of a Digital Teddy Bear Shows How College Learning Is Changing

This story highlights the changing nature of education, driven in part by computationally-enabled entrepreneurship. Hackathons such as MHacks at U-M and other "outside the classroom" activities have created new opportunities for students to manage their own educations. The digital teddy bears highlighted in the story came to life as a project at MHacks 6. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Entrepreneurship  

A Journey from the Ibn Sina School to Graduate School at U-M

Sherin Hazboun has had many obstacles in her life, but that has not deterred her from moving abroard to pursue her degree in computer science. She was in the first cohort of students that Prof. Karem Sakallah taught at the Ibn Sina School for Computer Science, an institution in Palestine that was launched in 2012. Since then he has been her mentor, leading her to the University of Michigan, where she is currently pursuing her masters degree in CSE. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Sakallah, Karem  

Researchers make progress on holy grail of autonomous vehicles: driving in snow

This story by Michigan Radio talks about testing autonomous cars on snow covered roads. The new research was done by Profs. Edwin Olson and Ryan Eustice in collaboration with Ford. The new research shows it's possible for a self-driving car to get around using highly detailed 3D maps of everything that surrounds the vehicle. The news was also featured in their top of the hour news summary, please click here to listen. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Fairy doors appear on University of Michigan's North Campus

San Francisco's SF Gate has noted the appearance of Fairy Doors on North Campus, including the first -- discovered by Prof. Rada Mihalcea, her daughter, and research fellow Carmen Banea -- which was found in CSE's Beyster Building. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hacks  Mihalcea, Rada  

Ford tests driverless cars in snow at U-M's Mcity

This article in MLive covers work done by Profs. Edwin Olson and Ryan Eustice in collaboration with Ford at Mcity, in which the researchers have tested new technology that allows autonomous vehicles to navigate on snow-covered streets. Their solution combines live LIDAR data with learned 3D map stores to enable the systems to compute location and to drive successfully. It is believed that this is the first test to address the challenges of snow-covered roads. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

U-M, Ford are First to Address Autonomous Driving on Snow-Covered Roads

Researchers at U-M and Ford have tested new technology that allows autonomous vehicles to navigate on snow-covered streets. Their solution combines live LIDAR data with learned 3D map stores to enable the systems to compute location and to drive successfully. It is believed that this is the first test to address the challenges of snow-covered roads. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Fairy doors appearing on U-M's North Campus

This story in MLive reports on the recent appearances of Fairy Doors on North Campus. The first, discovered by Prof. Rada Mihalcea, her daughter, and research fellow Carmen Banea, was found in CSE's Beyster Building. Since then, the story reports, two more have been found in the Chrysler Center. We're glad the fairies have come to stay! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hacks  Mihalcea, Rada  

Elementary Programming Class Introduces Students to Coding

This story in The Michigan Daily highlights EECS 183, the introductory CS course taught by Dr. Mary Lou Dorf, who designed the class to be experiential and to provide the support for students to become both familiar with computing concepts and more confident in their ability to learn to code. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dorf, Mary Lou  

Fall 2015 Computer Games Showcase Highlights Over 20 New Games

On Friday, December 18th, Tishman Hall in the Beyster Building had a large crowd of over 100 attendees for the Fall 2015 Computer Games Showcase. The event showcased the final projects of computer science seniors in EECS 494, Computer Game Design and Development, which is taught by Jeremy Gibson. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Games  Gibson, Jeremy  Undergraduate Students  

The 'skyscraper chip' that could boost the power of computers by a THOUSAND

This arrticle highlights the called Nano-Engineered Computing Systems Technology (N3XT) project, a carbon nanotube transistor based stacked mricochip architecture under development by researchers at Stanford, Michigan, CMU, and UC Berkeley, including Prof. Igor Markov. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Markov, Igor  

Michigan Researchers Win the 2016 Applied Networking Research Prize

A team of researchers, including CSE graduate students Zakir Durumeric, David Adrian, James Kasten, CS student Ariana Mirian, and Prof. J. Alex Halderman have received The Applied Networking Research Prize (ANRP) for their paper, "Neither Snow Nor Rain Nor MITM... An Empirical Analysis of Email Delivery Security". The Applied Networking Research Prize (ANRP) recognizes the best new ideas in networking. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

How computers are getting better at detecting liars

This article highlights the lie-detecting software that was created by Prof. Rada Mihalcea. Using videos from high-stakes court cases, the researchers have built a lie-detecting software database that uses a persons words and gestures to detect behavioral patterns that may be out of the norm. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

New Lie-Detecting Software from U-M uses Real Court Case Data

By studying videos from high-stakes court cases, Prof. Rada Mihalcea and Prof. Mihai Burzo (UM Flint) are building unique lie-detecting software based on real-world data. Their prototype considers both the speaker's words and gestures, and unlike a polygraph, it doesn't need to touch the subject in order to work. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

New software analyses words, gestures to detect lies

This Economic Times article highlights Prof. Rada Mihalceas research. She is developing a unique lie-detecting software that considers both the speaker's words and gestures, and unlike a polygraph, does not need to touch the subject in order to work. By studying videos from high-stakes court cases she is building the lie-detecting software based on real-world data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

Dragomir Radev Named ACM Fellow for Contributions to Natural Language Processing and Computational Linguistics

Prof. Dragomir Radev has been elected a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) for contributions to natural language processing and computational linguistics. Prof. Radev is a leader in the field of computational linguistics, which leverages techniques from computer science and linguistics and is concerned with the computational aspects of the human language faculty. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Radev, Dragomir  

A Search Engine for the Internets Dirty Secrets

This MIT Technology Review article highlights a new search engine called Censys, which aims to help security researchers find specific hosts and create aggregate reports by tracking all the devices hooked up to it. Data is harvested through the software ZMap and the researchers are trying to maintain a complete database of everything on the Internet. The open-sourced project is led by CSE graduate student Zakir Durumeric. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Alumnus Nam Sung Kim Elected IEEE Fellow for Contributions to Circuits and Architectures for Power-Efficient Microprocessors

Nam Sung Kim (PhD CSE 04), an associate professor at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, has been named an IEEE Fellow, Class of 2016, for contributions to circuits and architectures for power-efficient microprocessors," which is a high honor for an associate professor. While at the University of Michigan, Kim was advised by Prof. Trevor Mudge. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Mudge, Trevor  

Why medical devices are so hard to secure

In this article, Prof. Kevin Fu addresses the security of medical devices. Many of the aging medical devices still in wide use in hospitals across the U.S. were built without much consideration for security controls. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Medical device security? Forget hackers, think 'hand-washing'

In this article, Prof. Kevin Fu talks about the potentially dangerous faults in implants and bedside devices. Fu states, if you're using this old software, these old operating systems, you're vulnerable to all that malware that garden-variety malware that has been out in the wild for more than 10 years. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Winter 2016: Multidisciplinary Capstone Design Project - Supplemental Information

Course No.: EECS 498-006 and EECS 498-007
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Tony Grbic or Greg Wakefield
Prerequisites: See PDF

Course Description:
See attached PDF [More Info]

Could hackers break my heart via my pacemaker?

This BBC article highlights Prof. Kevin Fu's first peer-reviewed paper describing an attack on a heart device. Fu and his team made a combination pacemaker and defibrillator deliver electric shocks, a potentially fatal hack had the device been in a patient rather than a computing lab. The article addresses the publics concern about the security of pacemakers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Researchers Receive NSF/Intel Award to Develop Visual Recognition System for Wearable Devices

A team of researchers including Profs. Jia Deng (PI), Jason Mars, Kevin Pipe, Lingjia Tang, Thomas Wenisch and CSE Chair Marios Papaefthymiou have been awarded a $1.4M joint NSF and Intel grant for their research project, Large-Scale Visual Recognition: From Cloud Data Centers to Wearable Devices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Deng, Jia  Mars, Jason  Papaefthymiou, Marios  Pipe, Kevin  Tang, Lingjia  Wenisch, Thomas  

Winter 2016: Multidisciplinary Capstone (MDE) Design Pilot

Course No.: EECS 498
Credit Hours: 3 or 4 credits
Instructor: Brian Gilchrist
Prerequisites: EECS student

Course Description:
EECS students, together with ME and MSE students, work on common, interesting, significant major design experience (MDE) projects. This pilot douse is about providing students real-world, multidisciplinary design project opportunities to satisfy their MDE requirement and for ECE masters students interested in meaningful project experiences.

For WN16, we will have several projects with a biomedical focus as well as energy, sports, spaceflight, and other areas needing EECS students (e.g. sensor/electronics, embedded systems, controls, and wireless). Please contact Prof. Gilchrist with questions. [More Info]

2015 CSE Graduate Student Honors Competition Highlights Outstanding Research

Biruk Mammo was the winner of the 2015 CSE Graduate Student Honors Competition. The competition culminated on November 23, when four finalists presented on an area of their research, with a panel of CSE faculty and industry sponsors from Northrop Grumman ranking the presentations. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Creating a formula to detect lies in the face (Spanish)

This article reports on research conducted by Prof. Rada Mihalcea and her collaborators in the area of deception detection. The researchers have produced a computer algorithm that is significantly better at spotting lies in courtroom testimony than humans are. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computational Linguistics  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Mihalcea, Rada  

Fairy Door in CSE is First at U-M

Fairies have for the first time ventured onto the Michigan campus and have taken up residence in a computer located in the Bob and Betty Beyster Building, which is home to CSE. Next time you're here, look for them in the first-floor atrium. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hacks  Mihalcea, Rada  

Winter 2016: Information Retrieval and Web Search

Course No.: EECS 498-001
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Rada Mihalcea
Prerequisites: EECS 281

Course Description:
This course will cover traditional material, as well as recent advances in Information Retrieval (IR), the study of indexing, processing, querying, and classifying data. Basic retrieval models, algorithms, and IR system implementations will be covered. [More Info]

Winter 2016: Introduction to Autonomous Robotics

Course No.: EECS 398-002
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Chad Jenkins
Prerequisites: Linear algebra (MATH 214, 217, 417, 419) and data structures (EECS 281 or equivalent)

Course Description:
This course will cover the essentials of robot modeling and autonomy. See flyer website for more details. [More Info]

Winter 2016: Social Computing Systems

Course No.: EECS 498-008
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Walter Lasecki
Prerequisites: EECS 493 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
Computation rarely exists in isolation. From social media, to collaboration and coordination tools, to crowdsourcing and collective intelligence, technology has risen from use as an individual tool for focused domains to play a role in or even mediate a majority of social interactions today. Social Computing is the study of this interplay between social processes and the computation that supports and augments them. This course will cover topics including social media, systems for supporting collective action, data mining and analysis, crowdsourcing, human computation, and peer production. [More Info]

All CSE News for 2016