Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

CSE News

Computing CARES: A Plan to Boost the Retention of Women in Computing

The field of computing is one in which women have been historically underrepresented. A few faculty in the CSE Division have recently begun in a new quest to boost the participation and retention of women in computing courses and degree majors. These expanded opportunities will be accomplished through a U-M's Third Century grant. Prof. Valeria Bertacco and Mary Lou Dorf spearheaded this effort through a proposal that they submitted this past summer to the Third Century Initiative. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Dorf, Mary Lou  Olson, Edwin  Ringenberg, Jeff  Wellman, Michael  Women in Computing  

Prof. Jason Flinn Receives U-M's Faculty Recognition Award

Prof. Jason Flinn has been selected to receive a Faculty Recognition Award by the Rackham Graduate School at the University of Michigan for his remarkable contributions to the University through achievements in scholarly research and excellence as a teacher, advisor and mentor. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Flinn, Jason  Lab-Software Systems  

From search to distributed computing to large-scale information extraction

Prof. Michael Cafarella was interviewed for the O'Reilly Daily Show Podcast, and excerpts from that conversation are published here. In the interview, he talks about the origins of Nutch, Hadoop (HDFS, MapReduce), HBase, and his decision to pursue an academic career and step away from these projects. They also discussed ClearCutAnalytics, his startup to commercialize a highly regarded academic project for structured data extraction. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Cafarella, Michael  Lab-Software Systems  

Prof. Kevin Fu Addresses Technical Debt of Medical Device Security at NAE Symposium

Prof. Kevin Fu was selected to speak at the 2015 US Frontiers of Engineering Symposium, which was hosted by the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). The event took place September 9-11 at the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center in Irvine, California. He was one of only 15 speakers who presented at the symposium. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Brad Campbell and Pat Pannuto Organize Robo Cafe Demo at DARPA Tech Conference

CSE graduate students Brad Campbell and Pat Pannuto participated in the Wait, What? A Future Technology Forum that took place September 9-11th in St. Louis, Missouri. The forum was hosted by DARPA and focused on future technologies in conjunction with national security. Campbell organized a demonstration from the TerraSwarm team that integrated technologies from five universities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Security (national and personal safety)  

Brilliant 10: Alex Halderman Strengthens Democracy Using Software

For the 14th year, Popular Science honors the brightest young minds in science and engineering. Prof. J. Alex Halderman has been named one of their Brilliant 10 for exposing the vulnerabilities in electronic-voting systems and working with governments to make them more secure. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

J. Alex Halderman Named One of Popular Science's Brilliant Ten

Associate Professor J. Alex Halderman has been named one of Popular Science's 2015 Brilliant 10 for his work in computer security and privacy. From exposing the vulnerabilities in e-voting systems to making voting more secure, he is the epitome of a bright young mind that Popular Science selects for their annual list. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Eleven New Faculty Join CSE

CSE is delighted to welcome eleven outstanding new faculty members to Michigan. From contributions in big data and computer architecture to robotics and cryptography, they'll help to lead and teach us as we enter a world increasingly shaped by computer science and engineering. [Full Story]

Silicon Valley, Seeking Diversity, Focuses on Blacks

This article in the New York Times reports on the diversity gap in Silicon Valley and describes some of the new efforts being undertaken to help black students to bridge the opportunity gap. EECS alumnus Erin Teague, director of product management at Yahoo, is quoted on her experience. "I didnt know what to dream for." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Diversity and Outreach  

Honglak Lee Receives CAREER Award for Research in Advanced Deep Learning Techniques

Assistant Professor Honglak Lee has been awarded an NSF CAREER grant for his project, "CAREER: New Directions in Deep Representation Learning from Complex Multimodal Data."Prof. Lee will develop advanced deep learning techniques to learn a robust representation that allows for holistic understanding and high-level reasoning (such as, analogy making, hypothetical reasoning and temporal prediction, and question answering) from complex, multimodal data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lee, Honglak  

MHacks 6 Showcased Another Round of Creative Projects

Student hackers from around the country have completed MHacks 6, which took place September 11th-13th, 2015 on University of Michigans North Campus. Over 1,300 students were represented at this 36 straight hour event to produce creative and impactful projects. The grand prize winner was Relay, an application that allows you to easily and securely access all of your accounts. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hacks  Undergraduate Students  

$3.46M to Combine Machine Learning on Big Data with Physical Simulations

Prof. Barzan Mozafari is co-PI of the new Center for Data-Driven Computational Physics. The center will build and manage a new computing resource, called ConFlux, which is designed to enable supercomputer simulations to interface with large datasets while running. The National Science Foundation is providing $2.42 million to develop the facility and the university is providing an additional $1.04 million. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Software Systems  Mozafari, Barzan  Supercomputing  

U of Michigan Project Combines Modeling and Machine Learning

This article in HPC Wire highlights ConFlux, the unique new facility, funded largely by NSF, to be built at Michigan which will enable supercomputer simulations to interface with large datasets while running. Prof. Barzan Mozafari will oversee the implementation ConFlux. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Software Systems  Mozafari, Barzan  Supercomputing  

Online security braces for quantum revolution

This article in Nature examines the security ramifications of quantum computers, which are expected to be a reality in the next 5 to 30 years. The article references work in the area of lattice based cryptography done by Prof. Chris Peikert and his collaborators. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cryptography  Lab-Theory of Computation  Peikert, Chris  

A Tricky Path to Quantum-Safe Encryption

This article in Quanta Magazine examines the security ramifications of quantum computers, which are expected to be a reality in the next 5 to 30 years. The article references work in the area of lattice based cryptography done by Prof. Chris Peikert and his collaborators. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cryptography  Lab-Theory of Computation  Peikert, Chris  

Michigan Researchers Win Best Paper Award at VLDB 2015

Prof. H.V. Jagadish, the Bernard A. Galler Collegiate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and CSE graduate student Fei Li have received the Best Paper Award at the 41st International Conference on Very Large Data Bases, which took place Aug 31st - Sept 4th in Kohala Coast, Hawaii. Their paper is entitled "Constructing an Interactive Natural Language Interface for Relational Databases". [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Jagadish, HV  Lab-Software Systems  

MHacks Adds New Workshops and Events for 6th Hackathon

Since the first MHacks in February 2013, Michigan students have built the bi-annual event into a sophisticated operation that draws speakers, participative sponsors, and student participants with a variety of technical and non-technical backgrounds. With each new MHacks comes new projects that showcase what students are capable of creating. There will be an emphasis on learning and diversity at this coming hackathon with their new workshops and events. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hacks  Undergraduate Students  

Fall 2015: Randomness and Computation

Course No.: EECS 598-04
Credit Hours: 4
Instructor: Grant Schoenebeck
Prerequisites: EECS 376

Course Description:
Randomness and the tools of probability theory have proven central in many areas of modern science, including, perhaps surprisingly, the design and analysis of algorithms. This course will be organized around the main tools and techniques (linearity of expectation, the second moment method, Chernoff bounds, martingales, Lovasz-Local Lemma, Monte Carlo Markov Chain, etc) used in probabilistic analysis of algorithms. Along the way, students will be exposed to a large variety of classic theoretical computer science works resulting from the applications of these same tools to both randomized algorithms and the analysis of random combinatorial objects (e.g. graphs, Boolean formulae) and deterministic algorithms applied to random inputs drawn from some distribution.

Advanced applications covered may include the Talagrands inequality; social networks; streaming algorithms; distributed algorithms; quantum computation; approximation algorithms; semidefinite programs; cryptographic protocols, and more. Specific advanced topics included will depend on the interests of the students.

If you are interested in theoretical computer science (TCS) or tools of probabilistic analysis, it should be a fun course. It will assume basic theory understanding (at the level of 376) and basic probability theory, and the methodology will be that of formal mathematical proofs. The course will be targeted as an introductory course for CSE graduate students studying theory (very broadly speaking)though others should benefit as well, including advanced undergraduates and graduate students from other areas. This course will count for a theory breadth requirement CSE masters and PhD students and for a depth requirement for PhD students. See course website for more information. [Full Story]

Relationship with Addis Ababa Institute of Technology Grows with Research Exchange Program

Profs. Todd Austin and Valeria Bertacco have started a research exchange program between UM and AAiT. During the pilot program, which took place this year, three U-M CSE graduate students, William Arthur, Salessawi Ferede, and Biruk Mammo, traveled to Ethiopia for one month to bootstrap research projects with current AAiT students. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Bertacco, Valeria  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Michigan Researchers create virtual reality 'Matrix' with unreal engine

Popular Science magazine gives a glimpse of U-M's 3D Lab, which focuses on research into virtual reality, 3D modeling/printing, motion capture, and other emerging technologies. The Michigan Immersive Digital Experience Nexus has been recently upgraded with an 'unreal graphics engine,' and improved tracking system. PS calls the results "nothing short of breathtaking." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Virtual Reality  

Don't like Siri? Build your own!

In this CBC radio interview, Prof. Jason Mars speaks about the rise of intelligent personal assistants and the computational load that is associated this trend. He and Prof. Lingjia Tang led the research project that resulted in Sirius, an open-source IPA that anyone can download and use. Sirius was used to model future workloads in order to determine requirements for future data centers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Machine Learning  Mars, Jason  

Fall 2015: Graph Mining and Exploration at Scale: Methods and Applications

Course No.: EECS 598-012
Credit Hours: 4 Credits
Instructor: Danai Koutra
Prerequisites: Prerequisites for Lec 012: Basic knowledge of Linear Algebra, Probability Theory/Statistics, and Programming (e.g., Python, JAVA, Matlab, R) or Permission of Instructor

Course Description:
Graphs naturally represent information ranging from links between webpages to friendships in social networks, to connections between neurons in our brains. These graphs often span billions of nodes and interactions between them. Within this deluge of interconnected data, how can we extract useful knowledge, understand the underlying processes, and make interesting discoveries?

This course will cover recent models and algorithms for exploring and making sense of large graphs, as well as applications in various domains (e.g., web, social science, computer networks, neuroscience). The focus will be on scalable, practical, but also principled methods, and students will have the chance to analyze large-scale datasets. The topics that we will cover include ranking, label propagation, clustering and community detection, summarization, similarity, and anomaly detection.

Fall 2015: Human Computation and Crowdsourcing Systems

Course No.: 598-011
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Walter Lasecki
Prerequisites: Programming fluency; senior undergraduate or graduate standing in either EECS, or Permission of Instructor

Course Description:
Using human intelligence to solve computational tasks -- also called human computation -- has enabled the creation of software systems that go well beyond the current boundaries of artificial intelligence (AI). Making open recruitment calls to large, often heterogeneous, groups of people (crowdsourcing) has allowed human computation to be scaled to provide on-demand services and even real-time responses. This course will cover the core work in human computation and crowdsourcing, with a focus on techniques for creating interactive intelligent systems that are powered by a combination of human and machine intelligence. We will also touch on the theory underlying many of the current approaches (e.g., game theory, voting theory, and machine learning), and potential ethical concerns raised by these systems (e.g., ensuring fair wages, and end-user privacy)."

Puzzling out which Ann Arborites construct crosswords for The New York Times

This MLive article highlights four Ann Arborites who contribute crossword puzzles to The New York Times. Among them is Prof. Jason Flinn, who began solving crossword puzzles while recovering from an illness. He became hooked an began constructing his own puzzles, the first of which was published in the Times on October 9, 2013 and the most recent on June 18, 2015. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Flinn, Jason  

John Holland (1929-2015): In Memoriam

John Henry Holland, University of Michigan professor of psychology, computer science, and complex systems, passed away on Aug. 9 at the age of 86. Holland was the first U-M Ph.D. in computer science (1959). He soon became one of the first professors in the U-M Department of Computer and Communication Science. [Full Story]

Making a Middle Class: Can Engineering Education Lift Ethiopia?

For the past six years, Profs. Todd Austin and Valeria Bertacco have been going to Ethiopia to visit the Addis Ababa Institute of Technology. In 2009, they went to talk about Michigan Engineering, in 2011, they established a 25-station computer lab, and in 2012, they spent a sabbatical teaching at AAIT. Recently, the professors attended a symposium in Addis Ababa where more than 30 U-M professors met with a range of Ethiopian professors and government officials to map the future of U-Ms role in the country. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Bertacco, Valeria  Diversity and Outreach  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

IBMs Rodent Brain Chip Could Make Our Phones Hyper-Smart

In this MSN article, Prof. Jason Mars comments on TrueNorth, a chip created by IBM that has the same number of neurons as a small rodent brain. This chip can run deep learning algorithms in smaller spaces with considerably less electrical power, which will allow more AI onto phones and other tiny devices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  

Zakir Durumeric Named MIT Technology Review Innovator Under 35

MIT Technology Review has named CSE graduate student Zakir Durumeric one of this years Innovators Under 35. Each year since 1999, MIT Technology Review selects exceptionally talented young innovators whose work they believe has the greatest potential to transform the world. His work focuses on developing quantitative, measurement-based approaches to combat threats against hosts and networks on the Internet. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

CSE Researchers Win at Texas Instruments Innovation Challenge

CSE graduate student researchers Sam DeBruin and Branden Ghena, together with their advisor Prof. Prabal Dutta and postdoctoral researcher Ye-Sheng Kuo received the "Best Environmental Impact" award and placed in the top ten at the Texas Instruments Innovation Design Challenge for their PowerBlade project. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dutta, Prabal  Embedded Computing and Systems  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Fall 2015: Data Science for Medicine

Course No.: EECS 498-005
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Zeeshan Syed
Prerequisites: EECS281 or equivalent

Course Description:
With increasing amounts of medical data becoming available there is an opportunity to significantly reduce the burden imposed by major diseases in a data-driven manner. This course provides students with a hands-on introduction to computational advances offering significant improvements in our ability to understand, diagnose, and treat major healthcare conditions. During the semester we will explore several foundational topics in data science for medicine, including data representation, data manipulation, data analysis, and data visualization with a review of organ system physiology and common medical data elements. Students will be introduced to these topics during lectures, with the class focusing on breadth instead of a focus on any single topic in depth to provide an opportunity to sample and apply data science techniques. The course also focuses on providing students with a significant opportunity to investigate the application of these ideas to real-world clinical challenges. Students will be expected to supplement theory in data science for medicine with a semester long project on actual medical data. Students will be encouraged to think creatively about traditionally hard problems and required to perform group research exposing them to designing practical data science systems for medical care. Students will also be exposed to research and potential entrepreneurship opportunities beyond the class.

University of Michigan Develops Social Sensory Surfaces for Autism Therapy [Video]

This story on WDET covers the work of students from EECS and the School of Art and Architecture in creating a blend of light, music, and structure to provide highly sensory experiences for children with autism spectrum disorder. Prof. Sean Ahlquist is interviewed; Dr. David Chesney appears in the video. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chesney, David  Engineering for the Greater Good  Technology and Wellness  

Virta Labs Introduces PowerGuard

Virta Labs recently introduced their flagship product called PowerGuard. While it looks like an everyday power outlet, its embedded intelligence detects when an infected device is plugged into the outlet by analyzing subtle power consumption patterns. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Michigan Rolls a Different Kind of Car off a Different Kind of Assembly Line

This story on the Big Ten Network highlights the work of Prof. Edwin Olson, who is using 3-D printed low-speed electric vehicles provided by alternative carmaker Local Motors to develop an intelligent transportation on demand system built around autonomous vehicles. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  Transportation  

Mary Lou Dorf Wins Best Paper Award at ASEE

Dr. Mary Lou Dorf and her collaborators have received the Best Paper Award at the 122nd American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference and Exhibition (ASEE) for their paper entitled, "Student Performance Improvement using Interactive Textbooks: A Three-University Cross-Semester Analysis." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dorf, Mary Lou  Technology for Education  Women in Computing  

Can hackers take over Ann Arbor's traffic signals? U-M researcher discusses

In this MLive article about the security of municipal traffic signal systems, the work of CSE graduate student Branden Ghena is highlighted. Ghena received permission to hack the traffic lights at an unnamed Michigan municipality in 2014, where he quickly demonstrated how signals could be taken under the control of a hacker. Ann Arbor's system, he notes, is hardwired and would require a direct connection, rather than a wireless connection, to hack. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Can hackers take over traffic lights?

In this Washingtion Post article about the security of municipal traffic signal systems, the work of CSE graduate student Branden Ghena is highlighted. Ghena received permission to hack the traffic lights at an unnamed Michigan municipality in 2014, where he quickly demonstrated how signals could be taken under the control of a hacker. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

An Eye for Detail Brings Unique Rewards

Prof. Igor Markov has received two Knuth reward checks in exchange for suggesting improvements to publications authored by Prof. Donald Knuth of Stanford. According to MIT Technology Review, "Knuths reward checks are among computerdom's most prized trophies." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Markov, Igor  

Lynn Conway Receives 2015 IEEE/RSE James Clerk Maxwell Medal

Lynn Conway, Professor Emerita of EECS, received the 2015 IEEE/RSE James Clerk Maxwell Medal, for contributions to and leadership in design methodology and pedagogy enabling rapid advances and dissemination of VLSI design tools and systems. The James Clerk Maxwell Medal is one of the highest awards presented by IEEE. [Watch her acceptance speech.] [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Conway, Lynn  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Women in Computing  

The Conversation: Big Data analyses depend on starting with clean data points

Join The Conversation about big data, where Prof. HV Jagadish has written about the need to avoid inaccuracies in large data sets and how an emphasis on clean data should motivate data collection and processing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Jagadish, HV  Lab-Software Systems  

Dragomir Radev Coaches US Linguistics Team to Multiple Wins at IOL

Dragomir Radev, Professor in Computer Science and Engineering, the School of Information, and in the Department of Linguistics, has coached North American high school students to successful competition at the 13th International Linguistics Olympiad (IOL), which was held in Blagoevgrad, Bulgaria from from July 20-24, 2015. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computational Linguistics  Diversity and Outreach  Radev, Dragomir  

Two sentences explaining why your self-driving car wont have a steering wheel

Prof. Edwin Olson comments on why, once an autonomous vehicles is operating, it is actually difficult for a human occupant to take control in an emergency. Prof. Olson is working on projects related to autonomous vehicles and transportation systems at the newly-opened Mcity test facility. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Scientists warn against Artificial Intelligence weapons

Prof. Michael Wellman confirms that the potential for danger from automated weapons systems should be taken seriously in this story that appeared on Detroit ABC affiliate WXYZ. Prof. Wellman was one of over a thousand AI researchers who recently signed a letter to the UN urging them to ban robotic weapons. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

The race is on to figure out what self-driving cars should look like

In this Washington Post article, Prof. Edwin Olson notes that we don't know what autonomous vehicles might look like in the future, since autonomy will change many factors in the way transportation is scheduled and executed. Prof. Olson has just launched a project to study a transportation on demand system built around autonomous vehicles. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

EECS Students Make Career Connections at NSBE Conference

The 41st National Convention of the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) brought together over 3,600 members to Anaheim, California for career fairs, competitions, professional workshops, networking events, and elections. 55 U-M engineers attended the convention, themed Reimagining Your Future, and developed vital connections in their field. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Building Better RoboBoats: UM::Autonomy Takes Third at International Competition

Autonomous vehicles are in hot demand right now, and thats just as true at sea. UM::Autonomy designs, programs, and builds their own autonomous boat every year for the annual RobotBoat competition. This year the team took third prize. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Researchers Employ Unsupervised Funniness Detection in the New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest

Researchers including Prof. Dragomir Radev and his former student and alumnus Rahul Jha teamed up with Bob Mankoff, Cartoon Editor for The New Yorker, to take a computational approach to understanding humor. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Radev, Dragomir  

Over 140 Students attend 2015 MiBytes Computer Camps

MiBytes, a series of summer computer camps hosted by CSE, was even bigger and better for summer 2015. There was a 5-day Tinkering With Mobile Apps camp and a 2-week-long Hacking in a Digital World camp, both led by Dr. Jeff Ringenberg, as well as a 5-day Game Design & Development camp led by Dr. Jeremy Gibson. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Gibson, Jeremy  Ringenberg, Jeff  

Why Are Computers So Bad At Jokes?

What is funniness? Can it possibly be quantitative? And why is it so difficult to define -- for, say, a mechanical reproduction of it? These are questions that have plagued scientists for decades. And its the central question that brought together an incredibly diverse group of authors on a new paper looking for an answer, including Prof. Dragomir Radev; The New Yorker's Cartoon Editor, Bob Mankoff; and scientists from Yahoo! and Columbia. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Radev, Dragomir  

3-D Printed Cars Emerging; Early Units will Serve as Testbed for On-Demand System at Michigan

Prof. Edwin Olson will be using 3-D printed low-speed electric vehicles provided by alternative carmaker Local Motors to develop a transportation on demand system built around autonomous vehicles. He is quotes in the article about Local Motors' plans. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Four EECS companies make Crain's list of most innovative companies, and one tops the list

Four EECS faculty and alumni companies specializing in the life sciences and computer security made the list of the top 25 most innovative companies in SE Michigan, according to Crains. Topping the list is Omni MedSci, Inc., a medical device company founded by Prof. Mohammed Islam. At #3 is NeuroNexus Technologies, Inc., specializing in neural probes; at #11 is Integrated Sensing Systems, Inc., a company working on microelectronic implants for monitoring heart functions; and at #14, Duo Security, a computer security company. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Islam, Mohammed  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Lab-Systems  

All CSE News for 2015