Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

CSE News

Fall 2015: Graph Mining and Exploration at Scale: Methods and Applications

Course No.: EECS 598-012
Credit Hours: 4 Credits
Instructor: Danai Koutra
Prerequisites: Machine learning, basic knowledge of Linear Algebra and Programming (e.g., Python, JAVA, Matlab, R) or Permission of Instructor

Course Description:
Graphs naturally represent information ranging from links between webpages to friendships in social networks, to connections between neurons in our brains. These graphs often span billions of nodes and interactions between them. Within this deluge of interconnected data, how can we extract useful knowledge, understand the underlying processes, and make interesting discoveries?

This course will cover recent models and algorithms for exploring and making sense of large graphs, as well as applications in various domains (e.g., web, social science, computer networks, neuroscience). The focus will be on scalable, practical, but also principled methods, and students will have the chance to analyze large-scale datasets. The topics that we will cover include ranking, label propagation, clustering and community detection, summarization, similarity, and anomaly detection.

Fall 2015: Human Computation and Crowdsourcing Systems

Course No.: 598-011
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Walter Lasecki
Prerequisites: Programming fluency; senior undergraduate or graduate standing in either EECS, or Permission of Instructor

Course Description:
Using human intelligence to solve computational tasks -- also called human computation -- has enabled the creation of software systems that go well beyond the current boundaries of artificial intelligence (AI). Making open recruitment calls to large, often heterogeneous, groups of people (crowdsourcing) has allowed human computation to be scaled to provide on-demand services and even real-time responses. This course will cover the core work in human computation and crowdsourcing, with a focus on techniques for creating interactive intelligent systems that are powered by a combination of human and machine intelligence. We will also touch on the theory underlying many of the current approaches (e.g., game theory, voting theory, and machine learning), and potential ethical concerns raised by these systems (e.g., ensuring fair wages, and end-user privacy)."

Puzzling out which Ann Arborites construct crosswords for The New York Times

This MLive article highlights four Ann Arborites who contribute crossword puzzles to The New York Times. Among them is Prof. Jason Flinn, who began solving crossword puzzles while recovering from an illness. He became hooked an began constructing his own puzzles, the first of which was published in the Times on October 9, 2013 and the most recent on June 18, 2015. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Flinn, Jason  

John Holland (1929-2015): In Memoriam

John Henry Holland, University of Michigan professor of psychology, computer science, and complex systems, passed away on Aug. 9 at the age of 86. Holland was the first U-M Ph.D. in computer science (1959). He soon became one of the first professors in the U-M Department of Computer and Communication Science. [Full Story]

Making a Middle Class: Can Engineering Education Lift Ethiopia?

For the past six years, Profs. Todd Austin and Valeria Bertacco have been going to Ethiopia to visit the Addis Ababa Institute of Technology. In 2009, they went to talk about Michigan Engineering, in 2011, they established a 25-station computer lab, and in 2012, they spent a sabbatical teaching at AAIT. Recently, the professors attended a symposium in Addis Ababa where more than 30 U-M professors met with a range of Ethiopian professors and government officials to map the future of U-Ms role in the country. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Bertacco, Valeria  Diversity and Outreach  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

IBMs Rodent Brain Chip Could Make Our Phones Hyper-Smart

In this MSN article, Prof. Jason Mars comments on TrueNorth, a chip created by IBM that has the same number of neurons as a small rodent brain. This chip can run deep learning algorithms in smaller spaces with considerably less electrical power, which will allow more AI onto phones and other tiny devices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  

Zakir Durumeric Named MIT Technology Review Innovator Under 35

MIT Technology Review has named CSE graduate student Zakir Durumeric one of this years Innovators Under 35. Each year since 1999, MIT Technology Review selects exceptionally talented young innovators whose work they believe has the greatest potential to transform the world. His work focuses on developing quantitative, measurement-based approaches to combat threats against hosts and networks on the Internet. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

CSE Researchers Win at Texas Instruments Innovation Challenge

CSE graduate student researchers Sam DeBruin and Branden Ghena, together with their advisor Prof. Prabal Dutta and postdoctoral researcher Ye-Sheng Kuo received the "Best Environmental Impact" award and placed in the top ten at the Texas Instruments Innovation Design Challenge for their PowerBlade project. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dutta, Prabal  Embedded Computing and Systems  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Fall 2015: Data Science for Medicine

Course No.: EECS 498-005
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Zeeshan Syed
Prerequisites: EECS281 or equivalent

Course Description:
With increasing amounts of medical data becoming available there is an opportunity to significantly reduce the burden imposed by major diseases in a data-driven manner. This course provides students with a hands-on introduction to computational advances offering significant improvements in our ability to understand, diagnose, and treat major healthcare conditions. During the semester we will explore several foundational topics in data science for medicine, including data representation, data manipulation, data analysis, and data visualization with a review of organ system physiology and common medical data elements. Students will be introduced to these topics during lectures, with the class focusing on breadth instead of a focus on any single topic in depth to provide an opportunity to sample and apply data science techniques. The course also focuses on providing students with a significant opportunity to investigate the application of these ideas to real-world clinical challenges. Students will be expected to supplement theory in data science for medicine with a semester long project on actual medical data. Students will be encouraged to think creatively about traditionally hard problems and required to perform group research exposing them to designing practical data science systems for medical care. Students will also be exposed to research and potential entrepreneurship opportunities beyond the class.

University of Michigan Develops Social Sensory Surfaces for Autism Therapy [Video]

This story on WDET covers the work of students from EECS and the School of Art and Architecture in creating a blend of light, music, and structure to provide highly sensory experiences for children with autism spectrum disorder. Prof. Sean Ahlquist is interviewed; Dr. David Chesney appears in the video. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chesney, David  Engineering for the Greater Good  Technology and Wellness  

Virta Labs Introduces PowerGuard

Virta Labs recently introduced their flagship product called PowerGuard. While it looks like an everyday power outlet, its embedded intelligence detects when an infected device is plugged into the outlet by analyzing subtle power consumption patterns. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Michigan Rolls a Different Kind of Car off a Different Kind of Assembly Line

This story on the Big Ten Network highlights the work of Prof. Edwin Olson, who is using 3-D printed low-speed electric vehicles provided by alternative carmaker Local Motors to develop an intelligent transportation on demand system built around autonomous vehicles. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  Transportation  

Mary Lou Dorf Wins Best Paper Award at ASEE

Dr. Mary Lou Dorf and her collaborators have received the Best Paper Award at the 122nd American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference and Exhibition (ASEE) for their paper entitled, "Student Performance Improvement using Interactive Textbooks: A Three-University Cross-Semester Analysis." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dorf, Mary Lou  Technology for Education  

Can hackers take over Ann Arbor's traffic signals? U-M researcher discusses

In this MLive article about the security of municipal traffic signal systems, the work of CSE graduate student Branden Ghena is highlighted. Ghena received permission to hack the traffic lights at an unnamed Michigan municipality in 2014, where he quickly demonstrated how signals could be taken under the control of a hacker. Ann Arbor's system, he notes, is hardwired and would require a direct connection, rather than a wireless connection, to hack. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Can hackers take over traffic lights?

In this Washingtion Post article about the security of municipal traffic signal systems, the work of CSE graduate student Branden Ghena is highlighted. Ghena received permission to hack the traffic lights at an unnamed Michigan municipality in 2014, where he quickly demonstrated how signals could be taken under the control of a hacker. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

An Eye for Detail Brings Unique Rewards

Prof. Igor Markov has received two Knuth reward checks in exchange for suggesting improvements to publications authored by Prof. Donald Knuth of Stanford. According to MIT Technology Review, "Knuths reward checks are among computerdom's most prized trophies." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Markov, Igor  

Lynn Conway Receives 2015 IEEE/RSE James Clerk Maxwell Medal

Lynn Conway, Professor Emerita of EECS, received the 2015 IEEE/RSE James Clerk Maxwell Medal, for contributions to and leadership in design methodology and pedagogy enabling rapid advances and dissemination of VLSI design tools and systems. The James Clerk Maxwell Medal is one of the highest awards presented by IEEE. [Watch her acceptance speech.] [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Conway, Lynn  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  

The Conversation: Big Data analyses depend on starting with clean data points

Join The Conversation about big data, where Prof. HV Jagadish has written about the need to avoid inaccuracies in large data sets and how an emphasis on clean data should motivate data collection and processing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Jagadish, HV  Lab-Software Systems  

Dragomir Radev Coaches US Linguistics Team to Multiple Wins at IOL

Dragomir Radev, Professor in Computer Science and Engineering, the School of Information, and in the Department of Linguistics, has coached North American high school students to successful competition at the 13th International Linguistics Olympiad (IOL), which was held in Blagoevgrad, Bulgaria from from July 20-24, 2015. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computational Linguistics  Diversity and Outreach  Radev, Dragomir  

Two sentences explaining why your self-driving car wont have a steering wheel

Prof. Edwin Olson comments on why, once an autonomous vehicles is operating, it is actually difficult for a human occupant to take control in an emergency. Prof. Olson is working on projects related to autonomous vehicles and transportation systems at the newly-opened Mcity test facility. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Scientists warn against Artificial Intelligence weapons

Prof. Michael Wellman confirms that the potential for danger from automated weapons systems should be taken seriously in this story that appeared on Detroit ABC affiliate WXYZ. Prof. Wellman was one of over a thousand AI researchers who recently signed a letter to the UN urging them to ban robotic weapons. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

The race is on to figure out what self-driving cars should look like

In this Washington Post article, Prof. Edwin Olson notes that we don't know what autonomous vehicles might look like in the future, since autonomy will change many factors in the way transportation is scheduled and executed. Prof. Olson has just launched a project to study a transportation on demand system built around autonomous vehicles. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

EECS Students Make Career Connections at NSBE Conference

The 41st National Convention of the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) brought together over 3,600 members to Anaheim, California for career fairs, competitions, professional workshops, networking events, and elections. 55 U-M engineers attended the convention, themed Reimagining Your Future, and developed vital connections in their field. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Building Better RoboBoats: UM::Autonomy Takes Third at International Competition

Autonomous vehicles are in hot demand right now, and thats just as true at sea. UM::Autonomy designs, programs, and builds their own autonomous boat every year for the annual RobotBoat competition. This year the team took third prize. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Researchers Employ Unsupervised Funniness Detection in the New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest

Researchers including Prof. Dragomir Radev and his former student and alumnus Rahul Jha teamed up with Bob Mankoff, Cartoon Editor for The New Yorker, to take a computational approach to understanding humor. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Radev, Dragomir  

Over 140 Students attend 2015 MiBytes Computer Camps

MiBytes, a series of summer computer camps hosted by CSE, was even bigger and better for summer 2015. There was a 5-day Tinkering With Mobile Apps camp and a 2-week-long Hacking in a Digital World camp, both led by Dr. Jeff Ringenberg, as well as a 5-day Game Design & Development camp led by Dr. Jeremy Gibson. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Gibson, Jeremy  Ringenberg, Jeff  

Why Are Computers So Bad At Jokes?

What is funniness? Can it possibly be quantitative? And why is it so difficult to define -- for, say, a mechanical reproduction of it? These are questions that have plagued scientists for decades. And its the central question that brought together an incredibly diverse group of authors on a new paper looking for an answer, including Prof. Dragomir Radev; The New Yorker's Cartoon Editor, Bob Mankoff; and scientists from Yahoo! and Columbia. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Radev, Dragomir  

3-D Printed Cars Emerging; Early Units will Serve as Testbed for On-Demand System at Michigan

Prof. Edwin Olson will be using 3-D printed low-speed electric vehicles provided by alternative carmaker Local Motors to develop a transportation on demand system built around autonomous vehicles. He is quotes in the article about Local Motors' plans. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Four EECS companies make Crain's list of most innovative companies, and one tops the list

Four EECS faculty and alumni companies specializing in the life sciences and computer security made the list of the top 25 most innovative companies in SE Michigan, according to Crains. Topping the list is Omni MedSci, Inc., a medical device company founded by Prof. Mohammed Islam. At #3 is NeuroNexus Technologies, Inc., specializing in neural probes; at #11 is Integrated Sensing Systems, Inc., a company working on microelectronic implants for monitoring heart functions; and at #14, Duo Security, a computer security company. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Islam, Mohammed  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Lab-Systems  

U-M to Test Driverless 3-D Printed Carts

in this article, the Detroit News reports on the University of Michigan's plans to test low-speed, 3-D printed driverless carts within the year and eventually deploy them on its North Campus. Researches led b Prof. Edwin Olson will use the carts to develop an automated on-demand transportation system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

An Autonomous "SmartCart" Testbed is Coming to Michigan

Researchers led by EECS Prof. Edwin Olson and NAME Prof. Ryan Eustice will be using 3D printed "SmartCarts" at Mcity to develop an on-demand autonomous transit system. The focus of this particular project is not the autonomy itself, but the challenges of an intelligent transit system that include understanding passengers' preferences and expectations, coordinating the routes of a fleet of vehicles, and figuring out how to balance supply and demand. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles   Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Worlds smallest computer can fit on the edge of a nickel

David Blaauw, Dennis Sylvester, David Wentzloff, and Prabal Dutta, as well as several graduate students, have developed tiny computing units (on a millimeter scale) that are capable of harvesting solar power to utilize wireless communication, pressure and temperature sensors, and even still image and video processing. Ready for production now, the M3 is expected to see use in the medical field for monitoring human body processes, as well as conducting EKGs and detecting and monitoring tumor growth. Harkening back to scenes from the 1966 film Fantastic Voyage or 1987s Innerspace, the M3 can actually be injected into the body to perform some of these functions. [Full Story]

Miss Wayne County Inspires Young Girls to Pursue Computer Science

CS student Anna Dai is redefining the stereotype of women in computing. She is this year's Miss Wayne County, which she achieved through passion, talent, and hard work, and she is combining her pageant win with her love of computer science. She decided to run for Miss Wayne County to inspire thousands of little girls across the country as Miss Wayne County, and hopefully Miss Michigan and Miss America in the future. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  Women in Computing  

Prof. Kevin Fu Testifies on the IRS Data Breach for Senate Committee

As reported on the Computing Community Consortium blog, Prof. Kevin Fu was one of the five witnesses to testify to the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security & Governmental Affairs at a hearing on "The IRS Data Break: Steps to Protect Americans Personal Information." Video from the hearing is available here; Prof. Fu speaks at about 13:00. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  Security (national and personal safety)  

Ron Dreslinski Selected for IEEE TCCA Young Computer Architect Award

Dr. Ron Dreslinski has been selected to receive the Young Computer Architect Award from the IEEE Computer Society's Technical Committee on Computer Architecture (TCCA). The award recognizes an early career individual who has made an outstanding, innovative research contribution or contributions to Computer Architecture. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Dreslinski, Ron  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Steven Parkison Earns NSF Fellowship to Design Tools for the Future of Autonomous Cars

Steven Parkison, Ph.D. student in Electrical and Computer Engineering, has received an NSF Fellowship to support his research on machine learning for autonomous vehicles. He is working with Prof. Ryan Eustice as part of the Next Generation Vehicle (NGV) project, a partnership between Ford Motor Company and researchers at the University of Michigan and State Farm Insurance to develop the autonomous vehicles of the future. Michigans principal investigators, Profs. Eustice and Edwin Olson, are taking a leading role on sensing and decision-making. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Automotive industry  Autonomous Vehicles   Graduate Students  Olson, Edwin  

Massive Clinton-era Internet bug shows pitfalls of Obama's 'backdoor' proposal

In this CNN Money article, Prof. J. Alex Halderman is quoted regarding the FBI's request for security backdoors in technology products. "It's a bad idea," he says. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Duc Le Selected for Mary A. Rackham Institute Graduate Student Research Assistantship

CSE PhD student Duc Le has been selected by the Mary A. Rackham Institute for a Graduate Student Research Assistantship. The Institute's GSRA positions are offered to encourage outstanding doctoral students to pursue research careers in areas pertinent to the Institute's mission of promoting the well-being of individuals who are struggling with mental health, learning, and communication difficulties. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Interactive Systems  Mower Provost, Emily  

Introducing the Ensemble of CSE Ladies

The Ensemble of CSE Ladies is a group to support graduate women students in CSE at the University of Michigan. The group aims to foster a sense of community among graduate women, support members' academic and career development, help incoming graduate students adapt and thrive in CSE, and generally enable a great graduate experience for their members. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Graduate Students  Women in Computing  

Mark Brehob Named U-M Collegiate Lecturer

In recognition of his outstanding contributions to instruction, Dr. Mark Brehob has been selected for distinction through the U-M Collegiate Lecturer Program. His appointment as Collegiate Lecturer this year is a title he will retain throughout his career at the University. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brehob, Mark  

Michigan Researchers Win Both Best Paper Awards at AAMAS 2015

Michigan researchers won both best paper awards at the International Conference on Autonomous Agents & Multiagent Systems 2015, which took place May 4-8 in Istanbul, Turkey. The two winning papers were selected from a field of 127 full paper submissions in the main technical track. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

Michigan Researchers Win Best Poster Award at MobiSys 2015

CSE graduate student researchers Shichang Xu, Ashkan Nikravesh, Hongyi Yao (University of Michigan), David R. Choffnes (Northwestern University) with advisor Prof. Z. Morley Mao have won the Best Poster Award at MobiSys 2015. The poster describes their work in measuring important network phenomena for debugging problems at the edge of a cellular network. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile Computing  Wireless Communications  

Rumor-detector software IDs disputed claims on Twitter

Prof. Qiaozhu Mei and a team of researchers have developed software to help society identify and correct erroneous claims on Twitter. They introduced the software recently at the International World Wide Web Conference in Florence, Italy. Later this summer, they hope to put it in practice at a website they're developing called Rumor Lens. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Mei, Qiaozhu  

New data science major aligns with growing corporate needs

The Michigan Daily reports on the new data science major, which will be subsumed under the Computer Science and Engineering division and the Statistics Department. The new major will be available in Fall 2015 to both LSA and Engineering students. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Prakash, Atul  

Two Michigan Papers Share the Best Paper Award at MobiSys 2015

Two papers with authors from Michigan shared the best paper award at the 13th International Conference on Mobile Systems, Applications, and Services (MobiSys 2015). The first, "Accelerating Mobile Applications through Flip-Flop Replication," was an all-Michgan paper, and the second, "Outatime: Using Speculation to Enable Low-Latency Continuous Interaction for Mobile Cloud Gaming," was a collaboration from amongst Michigan, Microsoft Research, and other authors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chen, Peter  Flinn, Jason  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Mahlke, Scott  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  Mobile Computing  

2015 Faculty Promotions

Congratulations to the following faculty who received promotions this year: Prabal Dutta, J. Alex Halderman, Rada Mihalcea, Sandeep Pradhan, and Zhengya Zhang. Keep up the great work! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dutta, Prabal  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Mihalcea, Rada  Pradhan, S. Sandeep  Zhang, Zhengya  

Kevin Fu Named to CRA Computing Community Consortium Council

Prof. Kevin Fu has been appointed as one of five new members on the Computing Community Consortium (CCC) Council. CCC conducts activities that strengthen the computing research community, articulate compelling research visions, and align those visions with pressing national and global challenges. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

HTTPS-crippling attack threatens tens of thousands of Web and mail servers

ARS Technica reports on the Logjam vulnerability in detail and quotes Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who says, "Logjam shows us once again why it's a terrible idea to deliberately weaken cryptography, as the FBI and some in law enforcement are now calling for. That's exactly what the US did in the 1990s with crypto export restrictions, and today that backdoor is wide open, threatening the security of a large part of the Web." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

New Computer Bug Exposes Broad Security Flaws

The Wall Street Journal reports on the newly-discovered Logjam bug, which could allow an attacker to read or alter communications that claim to be secure and may have been exploited by the National Security Agency to spy on virtual private networks, or VPNs. The vulnerability could also be exploited by hackers. CSE Graduate student Zakir Durumeric, one of the researchers working on the bug, is quoted in the article. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Health and Fitness Company Founded by CS Alum Gets Acquired by Practo

Dhruv Gupta (BSE CS ༿) co-founded FitHo, a web and mobile based weight management program that provides customized diet plans and exercises, in 2011. FitHo has recently been acquired by Practo, an Indian health care startup that helps patients find doctors and book appointments online. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

All CSE News for 2015