Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

CSE News

Kevin Fu Named to CRA Computing Community Consortium Council

Prof. Kevin Fu has been appointed as one of five new members on the Computing Community Consortium (CCC) Council. CCC conducts activities that strengthen the computing research community, articulate compelling research visions, and align those visions with pressing national and global challenges. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

HTTPS-crippling attack threatens tens of thousands of Web and mail servers

ARS Technica reports on the Logjam vulnerability in detail and quotes Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who says, "Logjam shows us once again why it's a terrible idea to deliberately weaken cryptography, as the FBI and some in law enforcement are now calling for. That's exactly what the US did in the 1990s with crypto export restrictions, and today that backdoor is wide open, threatening the security of a large part of the Web." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

New Computer Bug Exposes Broad Security Flaws

The Wall Street Journal reports on the newly-discovered Logjam bug, which could allow an attacker to read or alter communications that claim to be secure and may have been exploited by the National Security Agency to spy on virtual private networks, or VPNs. The vulnerability could also be exploited by hackers. CSE Graduate student Zakir Durumeric, one of the researchers working on the bug, is quoted in the article. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Health and Fitness Company Founded by CS Alum Gets Acquired by Practo

Dhruv Gupta (BSE CS '03) co-founded FitHo, a web and mobile based weight management program that provides customized diet plans and exercises, in 2011. FitHo has recently been acquired by Practo, an Indian health care startup that helps patients find doctors and book appointments online. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Medical Education meets Google Glass

Google Glass is being adopted in anatomy labs at U-M as an avenue for hands-free and immediate access to information. The inventor of Glass, ECE alumnus Babak Parviz (MSE PhD EE; MSE Physics), anticipated these types of applications and has described how the Glass technology is changing what it means to know something when answers can be nearly instantaneous. Also mentioned in the article about Glass and medical education are alumni Larry Page (BSE CE), Founder of Google, and Tony Fadell (BSE CE), who is currently leading the team exploring the future of Google Glass. [Read more about Dr. Parviz and the development of Google Glass] [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Michigan Mobile Phone Ensemble Stretches, Challenges Performers and Audience

Creativity and tech were blended as the Michigan Mobile Phone Ensemble, under the direction of Prof. Georg Essl, performed 12 original works at its Final Class Concert in April. This story includes video of each of these unique performances. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Essl, Georg  Lab-Interactive Systems  Michigan Mobile Phone Ensemble  Undergraduate Students  

Computer Engineering Research Lab Explores the Bounds of Computer Integration

The new Computer Engineering Lab at U-M is the successor to the 30-year-old ACAL Lab and is home to researchers who are looking to stretch the definition of how computational systems are designed and employed. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

CE Alum Jon Fraleigh Named New Vorstack Executive

Jon Fraleigh (BSE CE '82) has been named senior VP of worldwide sales at Vorstack, a leading Threat Intelligence Platform provider for automation, curation, and sharing of threat intelligence to fight cyber threats. He was most recently senior VP of worldwide sales at Q1 Labs/IBM Security Systems Division, where he grew revenue from $10 million to $200 million over six years, and expanded sales into more than 90 countries. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Designing Machines - Can we create machines who learn like we do?

Technology certainly seems smart now - phones listen and talk, computers interpret images and video - but in spite of that, the field of artificial intelligence might best be described as a hot mess: an assortment of intriguing pieces that have yet to be integrated into a truly intelligent system. This article in looks at some of those pieces and how they might fit together. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Laird, John  Lee, Honglak  Lu, Wei  Memristor  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Hospitals are testing a way to detect malware by analyzing the flow of electricity to connected devices

One of the biggest reasons why health professionals are reticent to connect their devices is a concern over security for health tech, attacking a device can mean attacking a person. Prof. Fu talks about WattsUpDoc, a program that uses power and electricity as a means to detect if a malware has been introduced into a network. Hospitals are now slowly beginning to sign up and try out this new malware detection system.

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  Security (national and personal safety)  

Eric M. Aupperle (1935 - 2015): An Internet Pioneer Leaves a Remarkable Legacy

Eric Max Aupperle (BSE EE and Math '57; MSE NERS '58; Instm.E. '64), renowned president of Merit Network and Research Scientist Emeritus, passed away Thursday, April 30, 2015, at the age of 80. As director and president of the computer research network called Merit, Eric Aupperle had a strong influence on the current form of the Internet. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

EECS Graduate Student Instructors Earn Awards for Teaching Excellence

The EECS Department held its annual Graduate Student Instructor (GSI) / Instructional Aide (IA) Awards Ceremony on April 30 to honor top student instructors and aides for their remarkable service and excellence in teaching. ECE and CSE Associate Chairs Dave Neuhoff and Scott Mahlke hosted the event and introduced the awardees. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Mahlke, Scott  Neuhoff, David L.  

Bay Area CSE Alumni and Friends are Invited to Join Us for Tech Talks

Bay Area CSE alumni and friends are invited to join us for tech talks, conversation and hors d'oeuvres including Zingerman's from Ann Arbor on May 7th. More info and registration here. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Over 600 Students Present Final Projects at EECS 183 Showcase

On Friday, April 24th, a number of students, parents, and professors attended the EECS 183 Showcase at Palmer Commons. Non-CS students from EECS 183, Elementary Programming Concepts, presented what they learned about CS this semester in a day-long showcase that featured over 150 projects made by over 600 students. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Dorf, Mary Lou  Gibson, Jeremy  Undergraduate Students  

Your House Is Your Next Fit Band

This article in Discovery highlights a Wi-Fi based approach to a local area fitness monitoring system prototyped at MIT. It includes commentary by U-M Prof. Fu, who sees potential for the system, especially in cases where typical sensor placement is not viable. He does, however, have concerns about WiFi security for medical data transmission. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  Security (Computing)  

Winter 2015 Games Showcase Brings Lively Crowd to Tishman Hall

On Friday, April 24th, Tishman Hall in the Beyster Building had a lively crowd of over 100 attendees for the 2015 Computer Games Showcase. The event showcased the final projects of computer science seniors in EECS 494, Computer Game Design and Development, which is taught by Jeremy Gibson. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Games  Gibson, Jeremy  

Students Show off Projects during Winter Semester Showcases

A number of CS students finished the semester strong by displaying their projects during the winter semester project showcases. Students, professors, and parents were able to see a combination of hard work, creativity, and skill during the ENG 100, EECS 183, EECS 373, EECS 467, and EECS 494 project showcases. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Programming  Undergraduate Students  

New Undergraduate Program in Data Science Announced

CoE students have a new major course of study to choose from, and it's a highly relevant choice in this age of "Big Data." The program in Data Science, developed in conjunction with the Statistics Department, will help to prepare a class of experts who can extract actionable data from text, audio, video, and sensor measurements. The program will be offered for the first time in the Fall of 2015. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  

Digital democracy: will 2015 be the last paper-based general election?

There is a growing call for on-line voting in the UK with Estonia's system seen by some as a model, as discussed in this article in The Telegraph. However, work by Prof. J. Alex Halderman and others, including Halderman's 2014 assessment of the Estonian systems, point to major risks in the system [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

US hospitals to treat medical device malware with AC power probes

This article in The Register highlights plans for testing in two hospitals of a system that can detect malware infections on medical equipment by monitoring AC power consumption. Former CSE postdoc Denis Foo Kune developed the technology, called WattsUpDoc, with Prof. Kevin Fu and others while at Michigan. They have commercialized it through their startup, Virta Labs. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  

13 Of 2015s Hottest Topics In Computer Science Research

In this contributed piece on Forbes, Prof. Igor Markov presents his view of where computer science research will be focused in the near term. It's a list worth reviewing! [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Markov, Igor  

Shift Collaborative: Providing Creative Space and Community for Tech Students with Business on the Brain

Located in a house just off U-Ms campus, Shift Collaborative is home to a student group that exists to nurture and facilitate its members fresh and creative ideas for new applications, programs, products, or startup businesses. Originally the brainchild of U-M alumnae Nancy Chow and backed by funding from former University of Michigan and NFL football player Dhani Jones, Shift Collaborative was founded in the fall of 2013. [Full Story]

At 50 Years Old, The Challenge To Keep Up With Moores Law

NPRs All Tech Considered: Fifty years ago this week, a chemist in what is now Silicon Valley published a paper that set the groundwork for the digital revolution. That man was Gordon Moore. Moores Law is all about electronic miniaturization, and the article talks about the worlds smallest computer, the Michigan Micro Mote, currently on display at the Computer History Museum. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Dutta, Prabal  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  Wentzloff, David  

Eta Kappa Nu Awards Professors of the Year at St. Georges Day Feast

In an afternoon of food and fun, the annual department St. George's Day Feast provided a welcome break for students in their last week of class. As part of the event, two professors were chosen as 2014-2015 HKN Professors of the year by U-M Eta Kappa Nu, the local chapter of the national honor society for electrical and computer engineers. Prof. David Wentzloff, Associate Professor in ECE, and David Paoletti, lecturer in CSE, were chosen based on student input. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Undergraduate Students  

Advancing Computation: 4th U-M Alum Wins Turing Award

With the recent announcement of Michigan alumnus Michael Stonebraker as the 2014 Turing recipient, we'd like to recognize Stonebraker and three other Michigan alumni Frances Allen, Edgar Codd, and Stephen Cook who are recipients of this honor, extending a legacy of impact by Michigan alumni on the field of computing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Future Scientists Tour CSE

On Friday, April 10th, CSE Professors Valeria Bertacco and Todd Austin hosted a CSE visit for the preschoolers of U-Ms Towsley Childrens House. The event was a way for the children to experience computer science in a fun and engaging way. The day started with a meet and greet from Prof. Edwin Olson through his TeleRobot. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Bertacco, Valeria  

CS Students Sweep Awards at 2015 Mobile Apps Challenge

Computer science students dominated the awards for the 2015 U-M Mobile Apps Challenge, which is open to students, faculty, and staff campus-wide. First place went to freshman Janum Trivedi, who will be declaring in CS soon. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Mobile Computing  Undergraduate Students  

Elaine Wah Receives CoE Marian Sarah Parker Prize

Elaine Wah, a CSE PhD candidate, has been awarded a CoE Marian Sarah Parker Prize. The award is given to an outstanding woman graduate student who has demonstrated academic excellence, leadership qualities and outstanding contributions to the University and/or community. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Women in Computing  

The Crazy-Tiny Next Generation of Computers

This article in Medium describes Prof. Prabal Dutta's interest in Smart Dust - a network of tiny, sensor-enabled autonomous computers - and its ability to to measure everyday data to solve issues of critical sustainability. It traces how he began collaborating with Profs. David Blaauw and Dennis Sylvester on the development of the Michigan Micro Mote (M3), which is now the world's smallest and first millimeter scale computer. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Dutta, Prabal  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  

Duo Security Raises $30 Million To Protect Enterprises Against Data Breaches

Ann Arbor-based Duo Security, the two-factor authentication startup founded by CS alums Dug Song and Jon Oberheide, wants to do more to help protect companies from hackers trying to gain access to their networks. With that goal in mind, its launching a new product to secure their networks and announcing $30 million in new funding led by Redpoint Ventures. More in this article on Techcrunch. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Security (Computing)  

Creativity in the Classroom: Gibson Puts Emphasis on Collaborative Learning and Quick Prototyping in Games MDE

Many forward thinking educators are flipping the tables on their students by diverging from the standard classroom lecture format and implementing innovative curriculum in order to enhance student experience and stimulate learning. In his EECS 494 Computer Game Design and Development course, instructor Jeremy Gibson has done just that, and the results are promising. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Games  Game Design and Development  Gibson, Jeremy  

Machine politics: Electronic voting and the persistent doubts about its integrity

Prof. J. Alex Halderman and his collaborator Dr. Vanessa Teague are interviewed on Up Close, the research talk show from the University of Melbourne, about their work in investigating the iVote system recently used in New South Wales and about the security challenges of electronic voting in general. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

OpenSource.com: A case for predictable databases

Prof. Barzan Mozafari is interviewed in this Q&A on OpenSource.com about his open source DBSeer and DBSherlock database tools, and about guaranteeing a consistent and predictable level of performance is cloud-based database systems [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Lab-Software Systems  Mozafari, Barzan  

Elaine Wah Receives Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship for Research on Algorithmic Trading

Elaine Wah, a CSE PhD candidate, has been awarded a Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to support her research on algorithmic trading, or the use of automated computer algorithms to submit orders to buy or sell, in financial markets. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Women in Computing  

Karl Winsor Honored with Goldwater Scholarship

Honors Mathematics and Computer Science undergraduate student Karl Winsor has been named a Goldwater Scholar for the 2015-16 academic year. This program provides scholarships to students interested in careers in science, math, and engineering, and they are considered the premier scholarships awarded to undergraduates in these fields. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Theory of Computation  Undergraduate Students  

This is the worlds smallest computer

CBS News did a video and story about the Michigan Micro Mote (M3), which is the world's smallest computer and the world's first millimeter scale computer. "As the Internet of Things (IoT) gets bigger, the Michigan team is pushing to make computers ever smaller." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  

Why you arent voting for Chicago mayor from a smartphone

This article in the Chicago Tribune summarizes why Chicago voters won't be casting online votes in April 7's mayoral runoff election. Although other transactions can be accomplished by smartphone, "the shape of the problem is fundamentally different than things we routinely do online today," says Prof. J. Alex Halderman in the article. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Digital Democracy  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

The Hackathon Fast Track, From Campus to Silicon Valley

This article in the New York Times examines the phenomenon of hackathons and how they have become a new fast track to success in the tech industry. Quoted are CS major and director of the past two MHacks, Vikram Rajagopalan, as well as David Fontenot, a former MHacks director. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

Fall 2015: Plasmonics

Course No.: EECS 598-007
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Somine Eunice Lee
Prerequisites: None

Course Description:
Plasmonics is the study of optical phenomena related to the electromagnetic response of conductors. The furled of plasmonics has recently been accelerated by the rapid advancements in nano fabrication. The interaction of light with nanoscale objects renders unique optical, electronic, magnetic and thermal properties useful to a wide range of areas, including electrical engineering, biomedical engineering, chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, material science, chemistry and physics. [More Info]

Fall 2015: Power System Dynamics and Control

Course No.: EECS 598-003
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Ian Hiskens
Prerequisites: EECS 463 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
This course will introduce angle and voltage stability concepts and consider control strategies for improving dynamic performance. It will provide and overview of nonlinear dynamical systems, including geometrical properties of solutions, Lyapunov methods for approximating the region of attraction, and bifurcation analysis. [More Info]

Fall 2015: Foundations of Computer Vision

Course No.: EECS 598-001
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Jason Corso
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor

Course Description:
Computer Vision seeks to extract useful information from images, video and other visual content. This course will introduce the breadth of modern computer vision through a few foundational problems that span various topic areas. Examples of possible foundational problems include image formation and projective geometry, robust model fitting, perceptual priors, matching and similarity, invariance, motion and multi view geometry. The foundational problems will be tied to specific applications such as feature extraction, segmentation, structure from motion, and action recognition. [More Info]

Fall 2015: Hybrid Systems: Specification, Verification and Control

Course No.: EECS 598-002
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Necmiye Ozay
Prerequisites: EECS 562 or EECS 560 + permission of instructor

Course Description:
Hybrid systems, dynamical systems where continuous dynamics and discrete events interact, are ubiquitous and can be found in many different contexts. Examples are as diverse as manufacturing processes, biological systems, energy systems, medical devices, robotics systems, automobiles and aircrafts. Advances in computing and communications technologies have enabled engineering such systems with a high degree of complexity. Most of these systems are safety-critical, hence their correctness must be verified before they can be deployed. This course will provide a working knowledge of several analysis and design techniques to guarantee safety, reliability and performance of such systems. [More Info]

Fall 2015: An Introduction to Social, Economic and Technological Networks

Course No.: EECS 498-002
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Vijay Subramanian
Prerequisites: EE203 and/or EECS 301 are recommended

Course Description:
Networks are everywhere. We encounter a variety of networks of different sizes and forms on a daily basis: societal networks such as the network of retweets of a certain has tag on Twitter or the friends network on Facebook; technological networks such as the Internet with the telecommunication network of computers, the links between webpages, the groupings of users generated by recommendation systems for predictions or the network of users on BitTorrent downloading a specific file; and economic networks such as trade networks or supply-chain networks. Some of these networks emerge naturally such as many societal networks, while others are planned such as the public transportation or road network. We depend on the efficient functioning of these networks to transact many of our activities.

This course serves as an introduction to the broad class of networks described above: how these networks are connected, how they form, how processes and transactions take place on them, and how they are being transferred and interconnected in the modern world. Students will learn how to develop and apply mathematical models and tools from graph theory, linear algebra, probability and game theory in order to analyze network processes such as how opinions and fads are spread on networks, how sponsored advertisements are developed, how web content is displayed, how recommendation systems work, etc. [More Info]

Worlds Largest Processor Announced; Perfect for Big Data and Other Applications

Computer architecture researchers in the Computer Science and Engineering division of the EECS Department at the University of Michigan have announced a new paradigm in the evolution of computer development: the worlds largest processor chip, designed for big data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Smart Phone Apps: An Interview with Prof. Georg Essl (in German)

Prof. Georg Essl is interviewed on German public radio (WDR) on the subject of smart phone apps and their potential as musical instruments. The interview includes numerous musical examples from Essl's Michigan Mobile Phone Ensemble. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Essl, Georg  Lab-Interactive Systems  Michigan Mobile Phone Ensemble  Mobile Computing  

Our Data, Our Health. A Future Tense Event Recap.

This blog posting on Slate addresses threats to medical device security and highlights the thoughts of Prof. Kevin Fu on the matter. Prof. Fu directs the Archimedes Medical Device Research Center at Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Medical Device Security  Security (Computing)  

Probing the Whole Internet for Weak Spots

This article in MIT Technology Review profiles the work of CSE graduate student Zakir Durumeric. Durumeric led in the development of ZMap, the software capable of probing the entire public Internet in less than an hour. Through the use of ZMap, Durumeric was first person to realize the scope of the FREAK flaw. His use of ZMap was also pivotal to researchers' understanding of the recent Heartbleed flaw. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Software Systems  Security (Computing)  

Michael Stonebraker Receives ACM Turing Award

Michael Stonebraker (MS EE '66, PhD CICE '71) has been named the recipient of the 2014 ACM A.M. Turing Award for fundamental contributions to the concepts and practices underlying modern database systems. The ACM Turing Award, widely considered the Nobel Prize of Computing, carries a $1 million prize with financial support provided by Google, Inc. It is named for Alan M. Turing, the British mathematician who articulated the mathematical foundation and limits of computing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Voice Control Will Force an Overhaul of the Whole Internet

This article in Wired reports on Sirius, the open-source personal digital assistant released by Profs. Jason Mars and Lingjia Tang and graduate student Johann Hauswald. It focused in in the projects underlying thrust: that the data centers of today are not built to accommodate the voice-based data loads of tomorrow. Sirius is a tool that will help researchers to understand the needs of next-generation data centers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cloud Computing  Computer Architecture  Data Centers  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

All CSE News for 2015