Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

CSE News Story

Graduate Student Research Supported by Intel

Three EECS graduate students, Ruba Borno, Ashlesha Joshi, and Jorge Pernillo, have been awarded the Intel Foundation PhD Fellowship Award. This is a highly competitive award, and consists of two-year fellowships to Ph.D. candidates pursuing leading-edge work in fields related to Intel's business and research interests.

Ruba Borno, a graduate student in Electrical Engineering, works with Prof. Michel Maharbiz. She stated, "My research interests lie in the development of micro and nanotechnology mechanisms to address the demands for ultra low-power remote sensor networks. Technology miniaturization and the decentralization of sensing and computation necessitate novel energy-scavenging technologies. My research is directed towards addressing this need with the development of energy-harvesting micro and nanoscale actuators. Such actuators have applications in power generation for distributed sensing and unpowered self-assembly of microcomponents. My work thus far has demonstrated the potential of extracting work from liquid surface tension for actuation. The aim of the project is to engineer actuators that deflect and/or self-assemble controllably while powered only by environmental humidity. The experimental work is coupled with the development of an accurate theoretical model, which has generalized applications in the study of nanomechanics and fluidics."

Ashlesha Joshi, a graduate student in Computer Science and Engineering, works with Prof. Peter Chen. Her research interests lie in the areas of operating systems, virtual machines, and security. She stated, "I am interested in developing ways to make software more secure and robust using techniques at the operating system and virtual machine monitor levels. My work has focused on intrusion detection using virtual machine introspection. By combining VM introspection with vulnerability-specific predicates, attacks on known vulnerabilities can be detected with perfect accuracy and without unwanted perturbations to the target software.Future directions for this work include adding predicate support for interpreted programs, enabling automatic generation of predicates, and developing uses of predicates beyond intrusion detection."

Jorge Pernillo, a graduate student in Electrical Engineering, works with Prof. Michael Flynn. Pernillo stated, "My specific research interests are in the development and demonstration of integrated circuit techniques to facilitate controlled growth and imaging of cell cultures on a micro scale. This research involves the development of circuit techniques for imaging, analog to digital conversion and control. The techniques will enable new research in cell tissue development and disease. Furthermore since these techniques are compatible with CMOS integrated circuit technology they will facilitate cheap analysis and diagnosis."