CSE
CSE
CSE CSE

CSE News for 2018

Toyota funds professorship in AI at U-Michigan

Prof. Satinder Singh Baveja is U-M's first Toyota Professor of Artificial Intelligence. A $3 million gift from Toyota Motor Corporation endows the first named professorship in artificial intelligence at the University of Michigan and provides additional funding to support AI and robotics faculty. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Graduate student honors competition highlights outstanding research

CSE held its fifteenth annual CSE Graduate Student Honors Competition on November 7, 2018. The competition is the culmination of a process that narrows a field of entrants from each of the department research areas to a handful of finalists, each of whom gives a summary presentation on an area of their research. CSE faculty and an industry sponsor from Toyota Research Institute ranked the finalists' presentations. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  

Outstanding student research on display

This year, three students working with Prof. Emily Mower Provost were recognized for outstanding projects in their areas at the Graduate Symposium. Katie Matton and Matt Perez won two of the Emerging Research categories, Engineering Innovation and Science Communication, respectively; and John Gideon earned honorable mention for the Richard and Eleanor Towner Prize for Outstanding Ph.D. Research. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Graduate Students  Health and Safety  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Mower Provost, Emily  

Here's how an AI lie detector can tell when you're fibbing

Prof. Rada Mihalcea has worked on deception detection for about a decade. Popular Science looks at how she constructed one AI deception detector, and how it works. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

Precision Health Award for measuring moods

Prof. Emily Mower Provost and collaborators on the Prechter Bipolar Research team were one of 10 recipients of the Michigan Precision Health Investigators Award. The awards includes grants of up to $300,000 each over two years, and awardees were chosen from among an initial pool of more than 100 applicants with significant research projects. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health and Safety  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mower Provost, Emily  

A look at the election security charges in Georgias governors race

An already tight governors race in Georgia devolved into new chaos Monday after the Republican candidate, who is also the states chief election official, alleged with little evidence that Democrats sought to hack a voter database that will be used in Tuesdays elections. CSE PhD student Matthew Bernhard told the AP that anyone with access to an individual voters personal information could alter that voters record in the system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

The internet security company Dug Song is betting on

UM spinoff Censys, co-founded by Prof. J. Alex Halderman, PhD candidate David Adrian, and alum Zakir Durumeric, monitors all devices connected to the internet for threats. IT staff at companies can use Censys to discover new threats and assess their possible impact. The company attracted early attention from Duo Security's Dug Song, and plans to begin raising a much larger Series A round later in 2019 or in 2020. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Parabricks finds a niche to target its computing power

Parabricks LLC, a 2015 spinoff from the University of Michigan that signed an exclusive licensing agreement with the school last year, was co-founded by Prof. Scott Mahlke. In October, Parabricks was awarded a National Science Foundation Small Business Innovation Research Phase II grant of $748,000, which came with a matching grant of $125,000 from the Michigan Emerging Technologies Fund. That followed an NSF SBIR Phase I grant of $225,000 in 2017, which had a matching state grant of $25,000. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mahlke, Scott  

Q&A | Dont kid yourself, U.S. enemies are trying to hack our elections

As a national expert on election system security, Prof. J. Alex Halderman has never shied away from explaining how Americas election systems can and have been hacked. The University of Michigan computer science professor stops short of saying vote counts have been changed, but notes Russians tapped into voter registration lists in some states in 2016, and that he and fellow election-hack experts have demonstrated how state election systems can be infiltrated. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

J. Alex Halderman on Election Systems and Vulnerabilities

C-SPAN Prof. J. Alex Halderman talked on C-SPAN about voting machine security and vulnerabilities in US election systems. He took questions from live callers and online viewers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

403 Forbidden Study reveals new data on region-specific website blocking practices

New work led by Prof. Roya Ensafi and PhD student Allison McDonald undertook the first wide-scale measurement study of server-side geographic restrictions, or geoblocking, a phenomenon in which websites block access for users in particular countries or regions, a phenomenon on the rise causing Internet balkanization. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Ensafi, Roya  Graduate Students  Information Technology  Lab-Systems  

Understanding at every level

From quantum physics to computer systems: a profile of Pinaki Mazumder, professor of electrical engineering and computer science. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Mazumder, Pinaki  

A secure future for US elections starts in the classroom

Prof. J. Alex Halderman has been at the forefront of exposing vulnerabilities in electronic voting systems around the world. This Fall, Prof. Halderman and CSE PhD student Matt Bernhard are teaching a new special topics course on election cybersecurity, providing students with a deep examination of the past, present, and future of US elections with perspectives from computer security, tech policy, human factors, and more. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  Undergraduate Students  

Ahead of important elections, U.S. voting system is still vulnerable to hacking

This CBC Radio Q&A with Prof. J. Alex Halderman focuses on vulnerabilities that exist in the US voting system, as well as telephone voting in Canada and the US. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

[Video] Art Meets Science: Tom Conrad's Journey from Apple to Pandora to Snapchat

Alumnus Tom Conrad (BSE CE 1992) recently visited campus as the 2018 CSE Alumni Merit Award recipient. Conrad, a software designer with a long career with major industry figures, delivered a lecture on finding his passion in the software world. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Should You Be Afraid of Election Hacking? Here's What Experts Say

This article examines what it means to hack an election and what vulnerabilities exist. Prof. J. Alex Halderman is quoted on where we are with respect to this challenge. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

The midterms are already hacked. You just dont know it yet.

This in-depth investigation into the US election system reveals frightening vulnerabilities at almost every level. It quotes Prof. J. Alex Halderman and CSE PhD student Matt Bernhard regarding some of vulnerabilities that exist. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Self-driving cars will have to decide who should live and who should die. Heres who humans would kill.

In this article, Prof. Benjamin Kuipers comments on a study that surveys preferences for who to spare when an autonomous vehicle must crash. Kuipers says that the focus should actually be "If we can imagine a situation where this dilemma could occur, what prior decision should I have made to avoid this?" [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles  Kuipers, Benjamin  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

David Chesney to receive 2018 James T. Neubacher Award

The University of Michigans Council for Disability Concerns has named David Chesney, a lecturer in computer science and engineering, as the 2018 recipient of the James T. Neubacher Award. The award, established in October 1990, honors Neubacher, a U-M alumnus who was a columnist for the Detroit Free Press and an advocate for equal rights and opportunities for people with disabilities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chesney, David  Health and Safety  

How hackable are American voting machines? It depends who you ask

Prof. J. Alex Halderman is on a crusade to demonstrate how vulnerable American voting machines are, and some of his arguments are quite compelling. He has rigged mock elections. He has testified to the machines vulnerabilities in Congress and in court. He has even managed to turn a commonly used voting machine into an iteration of the classic arcade game Pac-Man. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Security Seals Used to Protect Voting Machines Can Be Easily Opened With Shim Crafted from a Soda Can

Election officials say security ties and seals prevent anyone with physical access to voting machines from manipulating them. CSE PhD student Matt Bernhard has shown how he can easily defeat them with just a soda can. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Computing pioneer to receive honorary U-M doctorate

Forty years after her paradigm-shifting work in microchip design and education, Lynn Conway will receive an honorary Doctor of Science degree at Winter Commencement 2018 on the University of Michigans Ann Arbor campus. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Conway, Lynn  Women in Computing  

CSE students celebrate women in computing at Grace Hopper

8 women in CSE stood among nearly 20,000 at this years Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing, the worlds largest gathering of women technologists, which is offered by AnitaB.org and the Association for Computing Machinery. Grads and undergrads traveled to the conference for career opportunities and presentations by women who hold lead positions across academia and industry. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  Undergraduate Students  Women in Computing  

Two papers announced among 10 most influential in healthcare and infection control

Prof. Jenna Wiens group had two papers highlighted in a session on the top 10 most influential papers in healthcare epidemiology and infection control at Infectious Disease Week (IDWeek 2018). The papers were selected for their impact, the number of times they were cited in the preceding two years, and their potential effect on future research and technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health and Safety  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Wiens, Jenna  

The logic of feeling: Teaching computers to identify emotions

Using machine learning to decode the unpredictable world of human emotion might seem like an unusual choice. But in the ambiguity of human expression, U-M computer science and engineering associate professor Emily Mower Provost has discovered a rich trove of data waiting to be analyzed. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Health and Safety  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Mower Provost, Emily  

Making software failures a little less catastrophic

Prof. Baris Kasikci presented a new technique called REPT REverse debugging with Processor Trace. In the paper REPT: Reverse Debugging of Failures in Deployed Software, Kasikci and collaborators propose a method to recreate the failing program execution to better diagnose the problem at hand. This technique is now deployed on Windows systems and the Windows Debugger platform. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kasikci, Baris  Lab-Systems  Software Systems  

Todd Austin recognized for outstanding achievements

Prof. Todd Austin has been recognized with the University of Michigans Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award, which honors senior faculty who have consistently demonstrated outstanding achievements in the areas of scholarly research or creative endeavors, teaching and mentoring of students and junior faculty, and service. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Gaining a deeper understanding of how personal values are expressed in text

Content analysis of large collections of text is often a useful first step in understanding what people are talking or writing about. PhD student Steve Wilson, Prof. Rada Mihalcea, and Master student Yiting Shen have proposed a new method of performing these analyses in their paper, Building and Validating Hierarchical Lexicons with a Case Study on Personal Values. The researchers earned a Best Paper Award at the 2018 International Conference on Social Informatics (SocInfo) for their work. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Language and Text Processing  Mihalcea, Rada  Women in Computing  

The Tinder for Markets Is Run on Crypto

In this article, Lynn A. Conway Professor of CSE Michael Wellman comments on the hedge fund Numerai and its market, which crowdsources data scientists to make predictions and is based on the cryptocurrency Numeraire. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

Tyche: A new permission model to defend against smart home hacks

Prof. Atul Prakash, CSE PhD student Kevin Eykholt, and CSE alumni Amir Rahmati and Earlence Fernandes have proposed Tyche, a safer app permissions system for smart homes and the Internet of Things. Their paper on this project, Tyche: A Risk-Based Permission Model for Smart Homes, received a Best Paper Award at the IEEE Cybersecurity Development Conference. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Internet of Things  Lab-Systems  Prakash, Atul  

Michigan CS makes waves at Tapia 2018

Students in CSE got the chance to network and celebrate diversity in computing at the 2018 Richard Tapia Conference, which took place in Orlando, Florida on September 19 - 22. This years conference theme was Diversity: Roots of Innovation, acknowledging the historical role of diversity in STEM innovation and its essential role in innovating the future. CSE staff attended the conferences exhibition hall as an event sponsor, and were able to connect with a number of students regarding programs of study in computer science and engineering at Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  Jenkins, Chad  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Undergraduate Students  

A champion for women in computer science

Prof. Rada Mihalcea has been selected as the Center for the Education of Women (CEW+)s 2018 Carol Hollenshead Award recipient for her work to increase the pipeline and retention of women in engineering and computer science. Mihalcea has dedicated substantial effort to developing programs that introduce more women to the world of computing and encourage them to pursue graduate studies and research careers in the field. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  Women in Computing  

Norman Scott (1918-2018): In Memoriam

Norman Scott, professor emeritus of EECS, passed away on August 20, 2018 at the age of 100. Prof. Scott was recognized not only within U-M, but also nationally, for his work on digital computer logic and design. [Full Story]

2001: A Space Odyssey: From science fiction to science fact

Three leading researchers, including Profs. Rada Mihalcea and Ben Kuipers, explored the question of science and science fiction in a panel discussion Friday, Sept. 21 part of Michigan Engineerings celebration of the 50th anniversary of 2001: A Space Odyssey. The panel preceded a screening of the film with live orchestral and choral accompaniment. Michigan Engineering and the University Musical Society co-sponsored the screening, which was one of only three such live performances across the country this year. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Kuipers, Benjamin  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

May Mobility puts autonomous shuttles on the streets of Columbus, Ohio

May Mobility, the autonomous shuttle company founded by Prof. Edwin Olson, is training its vehicles to navigate the streets of Columbus. May has already launched their vehicles in Detroit, completed over 10,000 trips, and this is the second full implementation of the tech. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Self-driving pods are slow, boring, and weird-looking and thats a good thing

May Mobility, co-founded by Prof. Edwin Olson, celebrated its 10,000th trip in Detroit, where its fleet of autonomous, six-seater shuttles offer rides to Quicken Loans employees for free along a one-mile loop. It only took the Ann Arbor-based startup 75 days to hit that mark, a sign that slow and steady can sometimes win the self-driving race. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Michigan startup May Mobility to deploy self-driving shuttles in Columbus, Ohio

Michigan startup May Mobility, cofounded by Prof. Edwin Olson, has announced that it has been chosen by the state of Ohio to begin testing a self-driving shuttle service on the streets of Columbus. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Women Killin it in STEM Fields

Prof. Rada Mihalcea was featured as one of 10 making incredible scientific discoveries in STEM fields from around the world. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

What does Duo Security's sale mean for the Ann Arbor area and its tech industry?

This article summarizes the viewpoints of a number of people in Ann Arbor's tech scene -- including Prof. Jason Mars -- on the ramifications of the recent purchase of Ann Arbor unicorn Duo Security by Cisco. Duo was founded by CSE alumni Dug Song and Jon Oberheide; Mars is the co-founder of Ann Arbor AI startup Clinc. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Introductory EECS course designed for women, those without prior experience embarks on first semester

This article provides an early glimpse of student experiences in EECS 198: Discover Computer Science. Taught by Prof. Rada Mihalcea and doctoral student Laura Wendlandt, the course provides a supportive atmosphere for students with more curiosity than experience in CS. [Full Story]

Hackers can spy on your computer screen just by listening to your webcam's microphone, experts warn

Prof. Daniel Genkin and a team of researchers discovered how hackers can spy on remote computers. LCD displays emit high-frequency sounds that can be recorded by a microphone, including from webcam, smartphone or smart speaker up to 30 ft away. These recordings are then fed into a machine learning algorithm and analyzed to generate an estimation of what's onscreen. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Genkin, Daniel  Lab-Systems  Machine Learning  

Researchers find way to spy on remote screensthrough the webcam mic

Prof. Daniel Genkin and collaborators have investigated a potential new avenue of remote surveillance that they have dubbed "Synesthesia": a side-channel attack that can reveal the contents of a remote screen, providing access to potentially sensitive information based solely on "content-dependent acoustic leakage from LCD screens." All that is needed is audio picked up by webcam microphones. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Genkin, Daniel  Lab-Systems  Machine Learning  

To cripple AI, hackers are turning data against itself

Data has powered the artificial intelligence revolution. Now security experts are uncovering worrying ways in which AIs can be hacked to go rogue. PhD student Kevin Eykholt talks to Wired. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Graduate Students  Lab-Systems  Machine Learning  Prakash, Atul  

Kickstarting the first year for women in computer science

The third annual CS KickStart gave 22 incoming women in CS a hands-on look at the skills and careers on offer in the world of computing. CS KickStart is a free week-long summer program for incoming first-year students that aims to improve the enrollment and persistence of women in CS and give women a voice in shaping the future through technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brehob, Mark  Das, Reetuparna  Diversity and Outreach  Ensafi, Roya  Laird, John  Undergraduate Students  

Cuba's "Sonic Attack" on the U.S. Embassy Could Have Been Merely Sounds Emitted by a Listening Device

A Penn bioengineer disputes a recent New York Times report suggesting microwaves accounted for what occurred at the U.S. embassy in Havana, agrees with hypothesis by Prof. Kevin Fu that the cause could have been ultrasound spy tech.

[Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Detecting Huntington's disease with an algorithm that analyzes speech

In an advance that could one day provide new insight into the progression of neurological diseases like Huntington's disease, Alzheimers and Parkinson's, researchers including Prof. Emily Mower Provost have demonstrated the first automated system that uses speech analysis to detect Huntington's disease. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Health and Safety  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Mower Provost, Emily  

Detecting Fake News With The Help Of An Algorithm

Prof. Rada Mihalcea recently developed an algorithm that can identify fake news stories better than humans. The algorithm uses linguistic clues to differentiate between factual and inaccurate stories. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

Faster, cheaper gene sequencing to make healthcare more precise

Arun Subramaniyan, CSE PhD student, received a U-M 2018 Precision Health Scholars Award for his project, Hardware-accelerated systems for next-generation sequencing analysis. Subramaniyan is working with his advisor Prof. Reetuparna Das to make genome sequencing as affordable as a routine medical test with highly efficient computing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Das, Reetuparna  Graduate Students  Health and Safety  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Outstanding Postdoctoral Fellow Award for smart conversation tools

Jonathan Kummerfeld, postdoctoral fellow in CSE, has been recognized by U-M for his excellence in research, teaching, mentoring, service, and leadership. The Outstanding Postdoctoral Fellowship Award is given to 10 fellows each year. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Interactive Systems  Language and Text Processing  

Algorithm outperforms humans at spotting fake news

An artificial intelligence system that can tell the difference between real and fake news often with better success rates than its human counterparts has been developed by Prof. Rada Mihalcea. Such a system may hep social media platforms, search engines, and news aggregators filter out articles meant to misinform. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

Alumnus Rick Mario Riolo: In Memoriam

Rick Riolo, Research Professor Emeritus of the University of Michigan Center for the Study of Complex Systems, has been one of the most visible and influential researchers, mentors, and instructors in the interdisciplinary field of complex adaptive systems for four decades. The author of more than 80 papers, Riolo made substantial methodological and applied contributions. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Alumnus Garlin Gilchrist named as running mate for Michigan Governor race

Garlin Gilchrist (BSE CE CS 2005) was named as running mate by Gretchen Whitmer in her bid for the Michigan Governorship. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

CSE welcomes 9 new faculty

Models of human behavior, scene understanding, cryptography, convolutional neural networks, IoT sensors and systems, and a commitment to innovating in the practice of education. With nine new faculty hires in 2018, Michigan is expanding and strengthening the scope of its research activities in computer science and engineering while simultaneously broadening participation in the field through a focus on innovation and inclusiveness in education. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Interactive Systems  Lab-Systems  Lab-Theory of Computation  

Google award to introduce women to computer science research

Prof. Rada Mihalcea and PhD student Laura Wendlandt have been awarded a Google grant to develop a workshop that will give undergraduate women in computer science valuable hands-on research experience. The workshop theyve proposed, spread over an entire semester, would engage around 70 undergraduate women in computing research through a series of hands-on activities and mentorship from research faculty. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  Women in Computing  

Kids at hacking conference show how easily US elections could be sabotaged

In this article, Prof. J. Alex Halderman is quoted on the problems that continue to exist with electronic voting, and why paper ballots should be used. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Fake news detector algorithm works better than a human

An algorithm-based system that identifies telltale linguistic cues in fake news stories could provide news aggregator and social media sites like Google News with a new weapon in the fight against misinformation. Led by Prof. Rada Mihalcea, the researchers have demonstrated that its comparable to and sometimes better than humans at correctly identifying fake news stories. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Big Data  Communications  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

Making online communication smarter with Trove Video

Trove is an Ann-Arbor based artificial intelligence startup built on the vision of improving communication using artificial intelligence. Profs. Danai Koutra and Walter Lasecki are collaborating with the company to develop novel methods and tools that will help make intelligent online communication smarter. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Communications  Koutra, Danai  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lasecki, Walter  

Two-wheeled teacher

Levi Weintraub (BSE CS 06) has lived on two wheels for close to two years now, putting his incredibly accomplished tech career on hold for an epic trans-African journey thats stoking his passion for travel and educating a cohort of aspiring African tech professionals. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Education  

Intel's SGX blown wide open by, you guessed it, a speculative execution attack

ARS Technica reports on the security work done by Michigan CSE researchers and their collaborators on a flaw in what was supposed to be a secure enclave in Intel chips. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Genkin, Daniel  Graduate Students  Kasikci, Baris  Lab-Systems  Wenisch, Thomas  

Spectre-Like Flaw Undermines Intel Processors' Most Secure Element

Wired reports on the security work done by Michigan CSE researchers and their collaborators on a flaw in what was supposed to be a secure enclave in Intel chips. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Genkin, Daniel  Graduate Students  Kasikci, Baris  Lab-Systems  Wenisch, Thomas  

Intel processor vulnerability could put millions of PCs at risk

A newly discovered processor vulnerability could potentially put secure information at risk in any Intel-based PC manufactured since 2008. It could affect users who rely on a digital lockbox feature known as Intel Software Guard Extensions, or SGX, as well as those who utilize common cloud-based services. CSE researchers contributed to the discovery of the security hole, called Foreshadow. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Genkin, Daniel  Graduate Students  Kasikci, Baris  Lab-Systems  Wenisch, Thomas  

Hackers are out to jeopardize your vote

Cyberattacks on the 2016 US election caused states to bolster the defenses of their voting systems. Prof. J Alex Halderman explains why this hasn't been enough in this Q&A piece. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Is Blockchain Technology the Future of Voting?

West Virginia is experimenting with voting via a blockchain network using smartphones. Prof. J. Alex Halderman cautions that such an approach is not yet truly viable, and that mobile voting using blockchain doesn't address core security problems that are unique to mobile voting. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Heartland Tech Weekly: How Duo Security built a $2.35 billion company in Ann Arbor

Venture Beat reports on Ann Arbor unicorn Duo Security's sale to Cisco. It quotes company cofounder Dug Son (CS BS 1997) on why he and cofounder Jon Oberheide (CSE PhD 2011) made the sale, the future for Duo, and the impact expected for the Ann Arbor tech scene. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Sounding the Alarm on the Dangers of Electronic Voting

Prof. J. Alex Halderman explains the dangers inherent with electronic voting machines, especially those without paperbackup, in the BloombergTV interview with Emily Chang. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Michigan Data Science Team wrangles big data

The Michigan Data Science Team brings together students from many fields to get their hands dirty with real data science problems and tools. The team gives members a place to learn from experts, form groups to tackle data science challenges, and do research that matches their interests. In the 2018-19 school year, Computer Science and Data Science undergrad Wesley Tian will be leading the organization as president, with plans to focus the groups activities and provide a better learning experience for new members. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Graduate Students  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Cisco is buying Duo Security for $2.35B in cash

Cisco today announced its intention to buy Ann Arbor, MI-based security firm, Duo Security. Under the terms of the agreement, Cisco is paying $2.35 billion in cash and assumed equity awards for Duo. Duo Security was founded in 2010 by Dug Song (BS CS ) and Jonathan Oberheide (BS, MS, PhD CSE , , ) and went on to raise $121.M through several rounds of funding. The company has 700 employees with offices throughout the United States and in London, though the company has remained headquartered in Ann Arbor. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Cybersecurity  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  

Voting systems in Wisconsin, a key swing state, can be hacked, security experts warn

This article at WisconsinWatch.org reports in detail on potential vulnerabilities in Wisconsin's voting system, including risks from Russian hacking. It reviews the response of Wisconsin politicians to this prospect as well as the viewpoints of computer scientists. Prof. J. Alex Halderman, an expert in computer, network, and election security, is highlighted in the story. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

People are bad at spotting fake news. Can computer programs do better?

This article is a survey of the many projects dedicated to using computing power to identify fake news. It includes a description of work being done at Michigan by Veronica Perez-Rosas and her colleagues on the use of language in the posts regarding fake news. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Perez-Rosas, Veronica  

Using software to beat Moore's Law: $9.5M to design the reconfigurable computer

In search of a new way to overcome the limitations of silicon, Prof. Ron Dreslinski is leading a project with a $9.5million DARPA grant to develop a hardware architecture and software ecosystem that together can approach the power of ASICs with the flexibility of a CPU. Called Transmuter, this software-defined hardware can change how programs use the hardware available to them in real time, effectively acting as a reconfigurable computer. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Dreslinski, Ron  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  

Enabling anyone to design hardware with a new open-source tool

In a $6.5 million U-M-led project that could revolutionize and democratize designing hardware devices, Professors Wentzloff, Blaauw, Dreslinski, and Sylvester will work to create an open-source hardware compiler that aims to reduce the six month process of hand-designing analog circuits to a dramatically faster and automated 24-hour routine. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Dreslinski, Ron  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sylvester, Dennis  Wentzloff, David  

Michigan chips will be first to test next-generation hardware design tools

Professors Sylvester, Blaauw, and Dreslinski will test tools and provide feedback in a national program that aims to build free, open-source electronic design automation tools. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Dreslinski, Ron  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sylvester, Dennis  

Making education accessible in rural India

CS student Divyansh Sharma is working to help combat the disadvantages of poverty in rural India with his non-profit startup EduTech Academy. Through EduTech, he and his team of ten developers are working to deliver free video courses directly to people in need of basic education. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Education  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Undergraduate Students  

Student org brings investors to Michigan

A new student org at the University of Michigan wants to build new connections for the startups in southeast Michigan and give undergrads a look into the world of venture capital along the way. Called UpRound VC and co-founded by CS undergrad Jonah Erlich, the group works with national and local firms to accelerate the entrepreneurial ecosystem of the region. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

The 5 States Most Vulnerable to a 2018 Election Hack

13 states are still using some electronic voting systems without paper backup. Five states rely upon them exclusively. According to Prof. J. Alex Halderman, "If a sophisticated nation state wants to cause chaos on Election Day, theyre probably already in our systems." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

University of Michigan to launch new website to help people navigate social media

EECS alumnus Garlin Gilchrist, executive director of the UM Center for Social Media Responsibility, says "it's time to reclaim your space." This is the message behind the center's new Social Integrity website, which is intended to help people to better navigate social media platforms. The site launched June 30. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Michigan's first Science Olympiad invitational for students, by students

This year, the University of Michigan offered the state's first Science Olympiad invitational competition run by Olympiad alumni. Conceived of and organized in part by CS freshman Omar Al-Ejel, the inaugural U-M Science Olympiad gave 45 high school student teams a place to hone their craft and prep for the core competition. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Rick Bergman sees that Synaptics stays in touch

ECE alumnus Rick Bergman, CEO of Synaptics, talked to The Mercury News about Synaptics and its evolution into other areas beyond physical touchpads. "At the end of the day, what we like to do is make devices easier to use," said Bergman. Synaptics products are used by Apple, HP, Lenovo, and Samsung, among others. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Tool for structuring data creates efficiency for data scientists

Transforming messy data into a usable state turns out to be labor-intensive and tedious. Traditionally, domain experts handwrite task-specific scripts to transform unstructured data. Enter Foofah, a project developed by CSE graduate students Zhongjun Jin and Michael Anderson, Prof. Michael Cafarella, and Bernard A. Galler Collegiate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science H.V. Jagadish that can help to minimize the effort and required background knowledge needed to clean up data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Cafarella, Michael  Data and Computing  Graduate Students  Jagadish, HV  

Exploring the source of social stereotypes

Incoming CSE PhD student Wilka Carvalho has been selected for the GEM Fellowship under the sponsorship of Adobe. Carvalho plans to work with Profs. Satinder Singh Baveja, Honglak Lee, and Richard Lewis (Psychology) to pursue research at the intersection of reinforcement learning, machine learning, and computational cognitive science. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Brain  Graduate Students  Lee, Honglak  Machine Learning  

Mars Rover Team tackles major redesign, places in top 10 at competition

The U-M Mars Rover Team brought a new remote astronaut assistant to the University Rover Challenge in the desert of southern Utah, pulling off a 9th place finish out of 36 competing international teams and 3rd out of the US teams. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

M-Fly's season ends with top-10 finishes, new autonomous plane

The M-Fly student aircraft design team provides undergraduates the opportunity to design, build, present, and test real-world aerospace projects. This year was extremely productive, with the team building more planes than ever, including its first autonomous craft. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Party for the people: UpNext app lets users shape the playlist

Tired of yelling song requests at the DJ until youre hoarse, and then getting shut down anyway? Turns out a lot of people are, so three U-M students are working to empower party-goers and democratize the dancefloor with their app, UpNext. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Mobile Computing  Undergraduate Students  

Finding meaning in varied data

CSE grad student Jie Song earned the runner up Best Paper Award at the 2018 Extending Database Technology conference for her paper GeoAlign: Interpolating Aggregates over Unaligned Partitions. Song devised a method to combine summarized datasets that group information by incompatible units. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Graduate Students  Jagadish, HV  Koutra, Danai  

New one-credit course allows those without experience to discover computer science

Interested in Computer Science? Heard about programming but not really sure how it works? A new 1 credit course, EECS 198, will take on these questions and more beginning Fall 2018. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Mihalcea, Rada  Undergraduate Students  

May Mobility Is Deploying Self-Driving Vehicles Now, Starting In Detroit

May Mobility, the autonomous shuttle service co-founded by Prof. Edwin Olson, is deploying low speed autonomous electric shuttles on the streets of downtown Detroit. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Undocumented immigrants' privacy at risk online, on phones

Every day, undocumented immigrants in the U.S. face discrimination, surveillance, deportation, and other dangers. When it comes to their smartphones, immigrants struggle to apply instinctive caution, according to a study by a team of University of Michigan researchers that included CSE PhD student Allison McDonald. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  

Can Ultrasonic Noise Make You Sick?

Prof. Kevin Fu and his research collaborators have shown how ultrasonic signals can contribute to produce audible and potentially dangerous tones similar to the ones that overseas diplomats have described. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Eric Winsor honored with Goldwater Scholarship

Computer Engineering and Honors Mathematics student Eric Winsor has been named a Goldwater Scholar for the 2018-19 academic year. The program provides scholarships to students interested in careers in science, math, and engineering, and they are considered the premier scholarships awarded to undergraduates in these fields. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

Faculty spotlight: Rada Mihalcea

Rada Mihalcea is a rock star professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at U-M's College of Engineering and a champion for the growth and retention of women in that field. She sat down to talk with us about why she loves what she does and wants other women to love it, too. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  Women in Computing  

Cafarella Receives VLDB Test of Time Award for Structured Web Data Search

This award is given to the VLDB paper published ten years earlier that has had the most influence since its publication. In this paper, Cafarella and co-authors Alon Halevy, Zhe Daisy Wang, Eugene Wu, and Yang Zhang set out to determine how to provide search-engine-style access to huge volumes of structured web data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Cafarella, Michael  Data and Computing  

Connected cars can lie, posing a new threat to smart cities

In the article in The Conversation, PhD candidate Qi Alfred Chen and Prof. Z. Morley Mao describe how vulnerabilities in intelligent infrastructure, such as the Intelligent Traffic Signal System being tested by the US Department of Transportation, can create opportunities for hackers to create chaos. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Lab-Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  

Designing a flexible future for massive data centers

The days of bulky, expensive servers filling up data centers may be numbered: a new approach recreates the power of a large server by linking up and pooling the resources of smaller computers with fast networking technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Chowdhury, Mosharaf  Lab-Systems  Mozafari, Barzan  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  

Paper award for training computer vision systems more accurately

PhD student Jean Young Song earned a Best Student Paper Honorable Mention at the Intelligent User Interfaces (IUI 2018) conference in Tokyo. Her paper, "Two Tools are Better Than One: Tool Diversity as a Means of Improving Aggregate Crowd Performance," offers an improved solution to the problem of image segmentation in computer vision by introducing a new way to think about leveraging human effort. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Vision  Graduate Students  Lasecki, Walter  

The sonic attack in China was probably clumsy ultrasonic eavesdropping

In this Quartz article, the author talks about Prof. Kevin Fus research on why the "sonic attacks" that poisoned diplomats in Cuba may have been the accidental effect of eavesdropping. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  

CSE researchers funded to connect music and big data

Four U-M research teams, including two teams led by CSE researchers, will receive support for projects that apply data science tools like machine learning and data mining to the study of music theory, performance, social media-based music making, and the connection between words and music. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Koutra, Danai  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Systems  Lasecki, Walter  Mihalcea, Rada  

US Employee Suffers Brain Injury After Sound Incident in China, Embassy Issues Alert

Prof. Kevin Fu determined earlier this year that the sounds as described could have been created by two listening devices placed in close proximity to each other. In such a scenario, Fu and his team concluded that the question of whether this was an intentional attack remains unanswered. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  

Exoskeletons compete to boost strength of rescue workers

U-M's STARX team hosted the first Applied Collegiate Exoskeleton (ACE) Competition, where teams from five schools gathered to tune-up, learn, and demonstrate their powered mechanical suits, which augment the wearers strength and abilities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Events (Post Event Writeups)  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  Student Teams and Organizations  

Study maps careers of CS PhDs using decades of data

Of the many burning questions in the world of computing research, the one most dear to a student's heart has typically been the least investigated: what happens after a PhD in computer science? Prof. Danai Koutra and CSE PhD student Tara Safavi set out to provide the world's first data-driven answer, analyzing several decades of post-PhD computing careers using a large new dataset rich with professional information. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Data and Computing  Koutra, Danai  

Computer science and business school students team up to create "intention" skill for Alexa

Inspired by a class on managing professional relationships, five recent University of Michigan graduates are developing an app that would mesh with Alexa to help nudge people when theyre out of sync with what they want. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Interactive Systems  Soloway, Elliot  Undergraduate Students  

"Stitching" together a web user from scattered, messy data

Modern internet users submit a massive trove of personal details to the web - but they scatter their data across dozens of websites, accounts, and devices with very little continuity. Prof. Danai Koutra will work to "stitch" these personal details together into a cohesive, useful whole, making a user's time online a more pleasant, continuous experience across devices with better product and service recommendations. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Data and Computing  Koutra, Danai  

Building a security standard for a post-quantum future

Chris Peikert, with a team of eleven other researchers, has submitted a cryptographic scheme as a proposed standard to the NIST Post-Quantum Cryptography project. Called FrodoKEM, this family of encryption algorithms is designed to be a conservative and practical implementation of one of the most-studied approaches in the post-quantum cryptography field. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Peikert, Chris  Quantum Science and Technology  

Reetuparna Das earns Borg Early Career Award

Prof. Reetuparna Das has been chosen as one of two recipients of the 2018 Borg Early Career Award. This award is given annually to women in computer science or engineering who have made significant research contributions and made a positive impact on advancing women in the computing research community. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Das, Reetuparna  Diversity and Outreach  Women in Computing  

Mike Stander honored with CoE Staff Excellence Award

Mike Stander received a 2018 College of Engineering Staff Excellence Award, recognizing 33 years of exceptional service to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science as a Hardware and Electronics Technician. [Full Story]

Keki Irani (1924-2018): In Memoriam

Keki Irani, professor emeritus of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, passed away on Wednesday, May 2, at the age of 93. He was a model faculty who made important contributions to the EECS department, was always supportive of students, and who supported the department at critical times throughout the years. [Full Story]

JPMorgan's latest hire proves the bank is serious about artificial intelligence

This article on the importance of AI to banking giant JP Morgan Chase quotes Prof. Jason Mars, co-founder of the startup Clinc, which makes AI products for the banking industry. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mars, Jason  

U-M programming team competes at highest level in ACM-ICPC competition

The Victors, a U-M student programming team, competed in the prestigious 2018 ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest (ICPC) World Finals in Beijing, China, on April 15 - 20, 2018. The team was able to correctly solve four out of nine problems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Compton, Kevin  Undergraduate Students  

Arthur Shi: Blogging about CS

Computer science is known to be a rigorous area of study, and students need to put forth countless hours of work to succeed. Undergraduate student Arthur Shi communicates the highs and lows of CS via the blogging platform Medium. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

Bryan Stearns receives CoE Distinguished Leadership Award

For the past year Stearns has served as President of the Computer Science and Engineering Graduate Student Organization (CSEG), whose membership comprises the entire body of over three hundred CSE graduate students. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Laird, John  

$6.25M project will decode worlds most complex networks

A new $6.25 million project built on game theory and led by Professors Mingyan Liu and Michael Wellman will develop tools to understand and shape online and on-the-ground networks that drive human decision making. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Liu, Mingyan  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  Wellman, Michael  

Yongjoo Park is runner-up for Jim Gray dissertation award

CSE alumnus and postdoctoral researcher Yongjoo Park (CSE PhD 2017) has been selected as a runner-up for the ACM SIGMOD Jim Gray Doctoral Dissertation Award for his dissertation, "Fast Data Analytics by Learning." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Lab-Systems  

CSE researchers win Best of SELSE award

have won the the best paper award at the 14th Workshop on Silicon Errors in Logic - System Effects (SELSE) for their paper entitled "Low Cost Transient Fault Protection Using Loop Output Prediction." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Computer Architecture  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mahlke, Scott  

Bring Your Child to Work Day features robots, games, and more

CSE faculty and staff got to show their kids how we have fun in Beyster. Bring Your Child to Work Day 2018 gave kids the run of the building, on a mission to find all the exciting activities the department had to offer. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  

Andrew DeOrio voted HKN Professor of the Year for CSE

EECS students voted, and lecturer Andrew DeOrio was named the 2017-2018 HKN Professor of the Year in CSE by the Beta-Epsilon chapter of Eta Kappa Nu (HKN), the national honor society for electrical and computer engineers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  DeOrio, Andrew  Student Teams and Organizations  

Here's how hackers could cause chaos in this years US midterm elections

This article reviews areas of vulnerability in the US voting system and how these weaknesses can be addressed. Prof. J. Alex Halderman, an expert in computer, network, and election security, is highlighted in the story. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Zakaria Aldeneh selected for IBM Ph.D. Fellowship

Zakaria Aldeneh, CSE graduate student, has been selected to receive a prestigious IBM Ph.D. Fellowship. Aldeneh is working with Prof. Emily Mower Provost in the area of social signal processing. Aldeneh's research focuses on identifying the features of speech that make human interaction feel natural. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Graduate Students  Mower Provost, Emily  

Three CSE faculty selected for Google Faculty Research Award

Profs. Jia Deng, Roya Ensfari, and Manos Kapritsos have been selected to receive the Google Faculty Research Award. The Google Faculty Research Awards Program aims to recognize and support world-class, permanent faculty pursuing cutting-edge research. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Deng, Jia  Ensafi, Roya  Kapritsos, Manos  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Systems  

I hacked an election. So can the Russians.

Professor Alex Halderman and the New York Times staged a mock election to demonstrate voting machine vulnerability. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Alum startup SambaNova collects $56m in funding for AI chip research

Startup SambaNova Systems, co-founded by alumnus Kunle Olukotun (BSE EE MSE PhD CSE ), earned $56M in its series A funding round to develop a computing platform that may reimagine how we power machine learning and data analytics. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Artificial Intelligence  Computer Architecture  Mudge, Trevor  

Tara Safavi earns NSF Graduate Research Fellowship for research on data mining

CSE graduate student Tara Safavi has been awarded an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship for her research in data mining on graphs, time series, and sequences. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Data and Computing  Graduate Students  Koutra, Danai  

CSE alum earns IEEE award for pioneering work in CPU design

Alumnus Kunle Olukotun (PhD CSE ) received the IEEE Computer Society's 2018 Harry H. Goode Memorial Award for his innovative work in multi-core processor design. Olukotun is often called "the father of multi-core processors" for his early contributions to this now commonplace technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Computer Architecture  Mudge, Trevor  

Possession of ransomware is now a crime in Michigan

There were more than 1,300 reported cases of ransomware attacks in Michigan in 2017, according to FBI statistics. New legislation signed by the governor closes a loophole that hindered the pursuit of suspected cybercriminals. Professor Kang Shin weighs in on the usefulness of these laws and headaches that may arise. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Shin, Kang G.  

Xinchen Yan Selected for Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship and Google PhD Fellowship

CSE PhD candidate Xinchen Yan has been selected for a Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship and a Google PhD Fellowship to support his research in machine learning and its application in computer vision, graphics and robotics. In his thesis, Xinchen investigates the conditional generation problem that synthesizes structured sensory data from a given conditioning variable. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Alumnus Garlin Gilchrist II serves as inaugural director of U-M Center for Social Media Responsibility

To address the growing concern of fake news, U-M has formed the School of Information Center for Social Media Responsibility, and hired one of President Barack Obama's former social media managers as its director, EECS alumnus Garlin Gilchrist II (BSE CE/CS 05). Gilchrist will ensure that people are connected, informed, empowered, and free to share their ideas on the internet. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

2017-18 Undergraduate Student Awards

Students, parents, and faculty gathered on Friday, March 16, 2017 to celebrate the achievements of EECS students who earned a special award for academic achievement, research, service, or entrepreneurial activities. Dave Neuhoff, Senior Associate Chair for Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Brian Noble, Chair for Computer Science and Engineering, presented the awards. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

Preventing deadly hospital infections with machine learning

New machine learning models tailored to individual hospitals could give them a much earlier prediction of which patients are most likely to develop C. difficile, potentially helping them stave off infection before it starts. The models are detailed in a paper published today in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wiens, Jenna  

Girls Encoded hosts panel to connect students with successful women in CS

On Tuesday, March 20th, around 25 undergraduate computer science students attended Sharing Perspectives Panel: Women in Computing, an event hosted by Girls Encoded that highlighted women software engineers and researchers in industry. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Women in Computing  

Michigan researchers discover vulnerabilities in next-generation connected vehicle technology

The US Department of Transportation has started implementing I-SIG, a vehicle-to-infrastructure technology that uses real-time vehicle trajectory data to intelligently control the duration and sequence of traffic signals. With the use of this system, comes vulnerabilities, and Michigan researchers have demonstrated that even one single cyberattack can greatly manipulate the intelligent traffic control algorithm in the current I-SIG system and cause severe traffic jams. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  Mao, Zhuoqing Morley  

CSE PhD student Matt Bernhard on the Facebook data breach

In this video, CSE PhD Student Matt Bernhard weighs in on the matter Facebook data harvesting, such as that done by Cambridge Analytica. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Lab-Systems  

How May Mobility Is Spearheading Autonomous Driving In The Form Of Shuttle Services

This article describes how the startup May Mobility, cofounded by Prof. Edwin Olson, to getting to market first by focusing on autonomous shuttle service. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

Igor Markov's duplicate text detection system now integrated with conference management software

Prof. Igor Markov's duplicate text detection system, called DUDE, is now integrated with Softconf's conference management software. Softconf is an internet company dedicated to organizing conferences, workshops and other software development events. DUDE is now integrated with their signature product, START V2, which is a web-based solution for managing peer-reviewed conferences and workshops. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Markov, Igor  

Security of State Voter Rolls a Concern as Primaries Begin

This article describes steps being taken in Illinois, the lone state known to have its state election system breached in a hacking effort, regarding its election systems. It quotes Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who points out that many of the same weaknesses present in 2016 remain. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Election audits to debut in Mich. 2018 race

This article describes new measures to bolster security for Michigans 2018 midterm elections. Prof. J. Alex Halderman points out that additional progress can occur in the stat's process for auditing of paper ballots. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Hottest Major

In this article, the Ann Arbor Observer reports on the pressures that have emerged due to the exploding enrollments in computer science classes. According to CSE Chair Brian Noble, CSE is constantly recruiting in an attempt to hire more faculty to handle the load. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Noble, Brian  

Igor Markov named a top Quora writer for fifth year in a row

Prof. Igor Markov has been named a top writer for 2018 on Quora, the question-and-answer site where questions are asked, answered, edited, and organized by its community of users. This is the fifth straight year that he has been ranked as a top writer on the site. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Markov, Igor  

U of M computer scientists might have solved mystery behind Cuba 'sonic attacks'

In this local news segment, Prof. Kevin Fu explains why the "sonic attacks" that poisoned diplomats in Cuba may have been the accidental effect of eavesdropping. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Embedded Systems  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Cuba "sonic attacks" - a covert accident?

The purported "sonic attacks" that sickened U.S. and Canadian government workers in Cuba last year could have been an accidental side effect of attempted eavesdropping, says Prof. Kevin Fu, who with his colleagues reverse-engineered the attacks in a lab. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Embedded Systems  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Can sound be used as a weapon? 4 questions answered

Were foreign diplomats and tourists in Cuba attacked with a "sonic weapon" or was it something else? Prof. Kevin Fu and his collaborators demonstrate a rational, evidence-based explanation. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Embedded Systems  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

New computing system to enable deep space missions

A new radiation-hardened, multi-processor, Arm-based spacecraft processor is being developed at Michigan in a project led by Boeing and funded by NASA. Prof. Ron Dreslinski is leading the research at Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Dreslinski, Ron  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mudge, Trevor  

Comcast offers 1-gigabit service in SE Mich.

In this news report, Prof. Mosharaf Chowdhury comments on the potential impact of Comcast's forthcoming 1-gigabit residential and business service. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chowdhury, Mosharaf  Data and Computing  Lab-Systems  Networking, Operating Systems, and Distributed Systems  

BMW, Toyota invest in U-M startup May Mobility

May Mobility, the autonomous vehicle microtransit company co-founded by Prof. Edwin Olson to replace existing transportation systems with fleets of self-driving micro-shuttles, has announced that BMW i Ventures and Toyota AI Ventures have joined its investor-base. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

How Can We Trust a Robot?

This article by Prof. Benjamin Kuipers is featured in the March 2018 Communications of the ACM. Prof. Kuipers discusses how advances in artificial intelligence and robotics have raised concerns about the impact on our society of intelligent robots, unconstrained by morality or ethics. Includes a video interview with Prof. Kuipers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Kuipers, Benjamin  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

BMW and Toyota are investing in a start-up that makes self-driving shuttles

May Mobility, cofounded by Prof. Edwin Olson, has received additional funding from BMW and Toyota for their autonomous shuttle technology. May hopes to get to market quickly by deploying shuttles on campuses and in other smaller-scale environments. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Autonomous Vehicles  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

How Artificial Intelligence Is Going To Affect The Financial Industry In 2018

Prof. Jason Mars, cofounder (with Prof. Lingjia Tang and others) of the AI startup firm Clinc, is interviewed in this article on the AI-driven conversational interface Clinc has developed for the banking industry. Clinc had sales of $4.5M in 2017 and his partnering with USAA to roll out their technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mars, Jason  Tang, Lingjia  

Prof. Michael Wellman participates in Asimov Memorial Debate

Michael Wellman, the Lynn A. Conway Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, participated in the recent Issac Asimov Memorial Debate on Artificial Intelligence, which was hosted by Neil deGrasse Tyson. You can see the entire debate in this video. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wellman, Michael  

The Myth of the Hacker-Proof Voting Machine

This article describes the security holes that exist in today's electronic voting machines, including both the shortcomings of voting systems that do not provide paper backup and those of the systems that transmit electronic votes to counting centers. It quotes Prof. J. Alex Halderman, who points to flaws in the protections for vote transmission systems put forth by vendors of paperless systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

Pacemakers, defibrillators are potentially hackable

This article on the security of cardiac implants quotes Prof. Kevin Fu, who notes that limiting remote interactions would also address scenarios such as an old computer virus that unintentionally shuts down global operations of remote cardiac telemetry for hundreds of thousands of patients at once. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Electronic devices  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Prof. John Laird and CSE Alumna Shiwali Mohan receive award for research on learning in autonomous intelligent agents

Prof. John Laird and CSE alum Shiwali Mohan have received the Blue Sky Award at the 2018 Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence conference for their paper, Learning Fast and Slow: Levels of Learning in General Autonomous Intelligent Agents. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Laird, John  

Chat tool simplifies tricky online privacy policies

Kang G. Shin, the Kevin and Nancy O'Connor Professor of Computer Science, and his collaborators have created an automated chatbot that uses artificial intelligence to weed through the fine print of privacy policies so that you will know what you're agreeing to. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Shin, Kang G.  

The Training Of Dr. Robot: Data Wave Hits Medical Care

This article reports on how machine learning is revolutionizing the process of making medical diagnoses. It opens by highlighting the work of Prof. Jenna Wiens and her collaborators in predicting a hospital patient's likelihood of developing a problematic C-diff infection. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wiens, Jenna  

Jia Deng selected for Sloan Research Fellowship

Assistant Professor Jia Deng has been selected for a 2018 Sloan Research Fellowship by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation for his work in computer vision and machine learning. He directs the Michigan Vision & Learning Lab and his research seeks to enable computers to see and think like humans. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Deng, Jia  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Michigan researchers predict emotions by examining the correlation between tweets and environmental factors

Research fellow Carmen Banea, alumna Vicki Liu, and Prof. Rada Mihalcea explored the concept of grounded emotions, focusing on how external factors, ranging from weather, news exposure, social network emotion charge, timing, and mood predisposition may have a bearing on ones emotion level throughout the day. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Language and Text Processing  Mihalcea, Rada  

Risk Aware Autonomy - Moving Artificial Intelligence Forward

This short video highlights the work of CSE PhD student Dhanvin Mehta, who is working on an algorithm to help guide robots in uncertain environments with constantly changing variables, such as for autonomous vehicles driving among pedestrians who can suddenly change direction or speed without signaling. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

To Fight Fatal Infections, Hospitals May Turn to Algorithms

This article in Scientific American describes how machine learning is revolutionizing the process of making medical diagnoses. It opens by highlighting the work of Prof. Jenna Wiens and her collaborators in predicting a hospital patient's likelihood of developing a problematic C-diff infection. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Wiens, Jenna  

Transducer Sensors Suffer Security Risks Based on Physics, Not Malware

This article references the work of Prof. Kevin, Fu, who has demonstrated that physical manipulation can be used to trick transducers into reporting environmental data that is inaccurate. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fu, Kevin  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

As cell phones proliferate in K-12, schools search for smart policies

This article includes a focus on the work of Thurnau Prof. Elliot Soloway, who is a proponent for the use of mobile tech in education. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Interactive Systems  Soloway, Elliot  

Persevering through the unknown: my conversation on emotion AI and problem solving with Emily Mower Provost

Prof. Emily Mower Provost was recently interviewed by the non-profit Iridescent - a company that brings science and engineering to underserved communities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mower Provost, Emily  

Alumnus Rob Rutenbar receives Phil Kaufman Award for distinguished contributions to electronic system design

Dr. Rob A. Rutenbar (MSE, PhD CICE 1979, 1984), senior vice chancellor for Research at the University of Pittsburgh, has been honored with the Phil Kaufman Award for Distinguished Contributions to Electronic System Design. While at Michigan, we was co-advised by Profs. Daniel E. Atkins and Trevor Mudge. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Prof. Chad Jenkins Receives CoE Trudy Huebner Service Excellence Award

Chad Jenkins, associate professor in Computer Science and Engineering, received the 2017 2018 Trudy Huebner Service Excellence Award from the College of Engineering. This award recognizes his significant and consequential contributions in service to the academy and his professional communities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Jenkins, Chad  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  

Collaborative master's program in data science announced

Developed and taught collaboratively by the faculty of the CSE Division of EECS in the College of Engineering, the Department of Statistics in the College of LSA, the Department of Biostatistics in the School of Public Health, and the School of Information, the Data Science master's program is now accepting applications for Fall 2018. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Data and Computing  Education  Lab-Systems  

Michigan researchers awarded 2018 Applied Networking Research Prize for their work on speeding up the mobile web

A team of researchers, including Prof. Harsha Madhyastha and CSE graduate students Vaspol Ruamviboonsuk and Muhammed Uluyol have received the Applied Networking Research Prize (ANRP) for their paper, "Vroom: Accelerating the Mobile Web with Server-Aided Dependency Resolution. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Systems  Madhyastha, Harsha  

Ann Arbor's Duo Security announces record-breaking year

Duo Security, the Ann Arbor-based security firm founded by CSE alumni Dug Song and Jon Oberheide, has grown spectacularly. The firm not only met, but exceeded, their 2017 goals. Since 2016, Duo has tripled its staff from 200 to nearly 600. It is now considered a "unicorn" with a valuation of over $1B. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  

2018 EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards

The EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards are presented annually to faculty members for their outstanding accomplishments in teaching, research, and service. The recipients of the 2018 EECS Outstanding Achievement Award are Peter Chen, Jason Corso, Jason Flinn, and PC Ku. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Chen, Peter M.  Corso, Jason  Flinn, Jason  Ku, Pei-Cheng (P.C.)  

Internet-scanning U-M startup pioneers new approach to cybersecurity

Ann Arbor-based Censys has launched based on work done over the past 5 years in Prof. J. Alex Halderman's lab. Censys is the first commercially available internet-wide scanning tool. It helps IT experts working to secure large networks, which are composed of a constantly changing array of devices ranging from servers to smartphones and internet-of-things devices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems  

CS alum travels Africa by motorcycle, planting the seeds of programming

Levi Weintraub (BSE CS 2006) left his job at Google to travel the world. He has ended up in Tanzania, where he has set up an IT training program. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

DARPA funds six centers working on computer design alternatives

This article reports on the six centers that DARPA has funded to jumpstart the computer computer architecture development. The $32M Applications Driving Architectures center, based at U-M and led by Prof. Valeria Bertacco, is one of them. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

Raymond Fok selected as finalist for CRA UG research award; two others receive honorable mention

CS undergraduate student Raymond Fok was selected as a finalist for CRA's Outstanding Undergraduate Researcher Award. The award program recognizes undergraduate students in North American colleges and universities who show outstanding potential in an area of computing research. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Undergraduate Students  

Reimagining how computers are designed: University of Michigan leads new $32M center

The Center for Applications Driving Architectures, or ADA, at the University of Michigan will develop a transformative, "plug-and-play" ecosystem to encourage a flood of fresh ideas in computing frontiers such as autonomous control, robotics and machine-learning. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Bertacco, Valeria  Computer Architecture  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  

U-M startup May Mobility blazes toward autonomous fleet market

May Mobility, co-founded and led by Prof. Edwin Olson, has tested its autonomous vehicles on the streets of Downtown Detroit. The startup recently licensed five autonomous driving related technologies from U-M, and outside of the life sciences, is the most successful UM startup in raising first round of funding so quickly. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

CSE Researchers Funded to Enhance Online Communication

Profs. Danai Koutra and Walter Lasecki have been awarded two grants from Trove.ai, an Ann-Arbor based artificial intelligence startup, to develop novel methods and tools that will unleash the power of online communication. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Koutra, Danai  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Systems  Lasecki, Walter  

New bill could finally get rid of paperless voting machines

Prof. J. Alex Halderman is quoted on the the vulnerabilities that exist in voting machines, why paper backup is a practical solution, and the approaches that should be taken in auditing election results. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Systems