Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

ECE News

Power Harvesting Sensor Patch Uses Your Body As a Battery

IEEE Spectrum reported on a sensor patch that can power itself by using thermoelectric materials to turn the temperature difference between your body and the surrounding air into electricity. The project, based at North Caroline State University's Center for Advanced Self-Powered Systems of Integrated Sensors (ASSIST), involves Prof. David Wentzloff, who specializes in integrated circuit design for adaptable wireless communication systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sensors  Wentzloff, David  

Injectable Radios to Broadcast From Inside the Body

IEEE Spectrum reported on medical devices being developed at Michigan that may one day be small enough to go through a syringe. Professors David Blaauw and David Wentzloff are collaborating with researchers at the U-M medical school to come up with the first test application. These devices will be able to monitor oxygen, glucose, and other biometrics, or follow disease progression in tumors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Health  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sensors  Wentzloff, David  

John L. Tishman, Builder Who Shaped American Skylines, Dies at 90

John L. Tishman, a master builder of the 20th century whose Tishman Realty and Construction Company transformed the skylines of Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles and New York, died on Saturday at his home in Bedford, N.Y. He was 90. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Necmiye Ozay Receives CAREER Award for Research in Cyber-Physical Systems

Prof. Necmiye Ozay, assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, was awarded an NSF CAREER award for her research project, "A Compositional Approach to Modular Cyber-Physical Control System Design." This research is applicable to a wide variety of safety-critical and autonomous systems, including next generation air vehicles, automotive systems, robotics and smart manufacturing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cyber-physical systems  Lab-Systems  Ozay, Necmiye  

Al Hero gets a shoutout from the court

Alfred O. Hero, received the spotlight at Tuesday evening's basketball game against Indiana. He was recognized as part of a program to shine the light on the University's most distinguished faculty. Prof. Hero, an internationally recognized expert in the field of signal and image processing, is the R. Jamison and Betty Williams Professor of Engineering, and co-director of the recently launched Michigan Institute for Data Science (MIDAS). [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hero, Alfred  

Muzhi Wang Earns a Best Paper Award for a New Tunable Filter for Wireless Communication Devices

Muzhi Wang, third year PhD student in ECE, has earned a Best Paper Award at the 2016 Meeting on Silicon Monolithic Integrated Circuits in RF Systems (SiRF) for his implementation of the first tunable filter for wireless communications to use a germanium-telluride phase change switch. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  MEMS and Microsystems  Rais-Zadeh, Mina  Wireless Communications  

2016 EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards

The EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards are presented annually to faculty members for their outstanding accomplishments in teaching, research, and service. The recipients of the 2016 EECS Outstanding Achievement Award are Prof. Anthony Grbic, Dr. David Paoletti, Prof. Mina Rais-Zadeh, and Prof. Thomas F. Wenisch. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grbic, Anthony  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Rais-Zadeh, Mina  Wenisch, Thomas  

Energy researchers receive $1.4 million grant

Researchers from the University, including ECE's Prof. Ian Hiskens, have received a $1.4 million grant from the Department of Energy to help develop data on power system optimization in energy grids. The team will work to develop new test cases to formulate better software algorithms for transmission operators to run the energy grid algorithms which regulate energy amounts. These operators are largely non-profit government agencies. The need for such research stems from the ongoing energy transition from traditional, emission-heavy sources such as coal and nuclear power to cleaner, renewable sources like wind and solar. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy  Environment  Grid  Hiskens, Ian  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  

What good is Nanotechnology? NBC Learn brings us Jay Guo to find out

How could something only billionths of a meter thick defend against water, dirt, wear, and even bacteria? Working at the nanoscale, scientists and engineers, like Jay Guo are creating protective nanoscale coatings and layers. These surfaces have applications in energy, electronics, medicine, and could even be used to make a plane invisible. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Coolest gadget of CES 2016? I pick Avegant's Glyph

USA Today was wowed by the Glyph, a new virtual reality headset by ECE alum-founded Avegant. Allan Evans (MS PhD EE ) and Ed Tang (BSE EE ) lead the company that says it can provide the world's first personal theater. With this technology, theres no screen, no LCDs, no OLEDs, no emissive panels at all. Instead, the images are generated from reflected light, which mimics how we see the world around us. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Virtual Reality  

ECE Celebrates African American Engineers

In recognition of Martin Luther King Jr. Day and the Black History Month, ECE would like to draw attention to the many contributions made by its African American faculty and alumni. The impact of these gifted individuals spans many fields and industries. Included in the list is the first African American woman to earn a BS and MS in Electrical Engineering, and the first African American faculty member in the College of Engineering. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Diversity and Outreach  Graduate Students  Undergraduate Students  Winful, Herbert  

Somin Lee Receives AFOSR Young Investigator Award for Research in Bioplasmonics

Prof. Somin Eunice Lee received a Young Investigator Award from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) to support research that will ultimately help our basic understanding of how tissues form distinct shapes and structure to become organs, such as lungs, salivary glands, and mammary glands. This understanding will facilitate new strategies to engineer replacement tissues. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lee, Somin E.  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Robert J. Armantrout Establishes ECE Graduate Education Fund

Robert J. Armantrout (BSE EE 1976) of Santa Clara, CA, has established the Robert J. Armantrout Endowed Fellowship Fund. The Fund will provide merit-based support to graduate students studying Electrical and Computer Engineering. Mr. Armantrout spent much of his career on RF test and measurement for the wireless community. He is currently a consultant at RedwoodRF, specializing in the wireless and RF domains. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

EECS Alumnus Leads $10M NSF Expeditions Project for Synthetic Biology

Douglas Densmore (BSE CE 01), Associate Prof. of ECE at Boston University, will lead the Living Computing Project, an effort to create a toolbox of catalogued biological parts that can be used to engineer organisms with predictable results. These parts will allow the entire field to understand better what computing principles can be applied repeatedly and reliably to synthetic biology. The project is funded under a $10 million National Science Foundation (NSF) "Expeditions in Computing" grant. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Kamal Sarabandi Receives Stephen S. Attwood Award

Kamal Sarabandi, Rufus S. Teesdale Professor of Engineering, received the Stephen S. Attwood award, which is the highest honor awarded to a faculty member by the College of Engineering. It recognizes "extraordinary achievement in teaching, research, service, and other activities that have brought distinction to the College and University." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Cybersecurity Startup QuadMetrics Calculates Odds a Company Will be Breached

As reported by the Wall Street Journal, QuadMetrics Inc. says it can predict with greater than 90% accuracy the likelihood that a company will be breached within the next year. QuadMetrics cloud service determines the probability of a breach at a particular company by collecting from its network more than 250 different data points. The company was co-founded by Prof. Mingyan Liu. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  Liu, Mingyan  Security (Computing)  

Prof. Anthony Grbic Elected IEEE Fellow for Contributions to the Theory and Design of Electromagnetic Metamaterials

Prof. Anthony Grbic has been elected IEEE Fellow, "for contributions to the theory and design of electromagnetic metamaterials." He has created radically new antennas and optical devices based on the development of novel metamaterials and metasurfaces. His research could pave the way for flat/low profile, integrated optical devices, as well as new generations of wireless consumer electronics and mobile devices that are either smaller or more versatile. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grbic, Anthony  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Metamaterials  

Inventive thinkers at NREL reach record number, including a shutoff idea designed to keep firefighters safer from an ECE alum

Chris Deline (BSE MSE PhD EE 03 05 08), a research engineer in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's photovoltaic performance and reliability group, has designed a concept for a "PV Module-Level Remote Safety Disconnect." The idea is to keep firefighters out of harm's way when they're called to a home with rooftop solar panels, which are normally much more difficult to cut power to in emergency situations. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Solar Cell Technology  

Chevy Bolt electric car could be the first mass-market EV success

ECE alumnus Andy Farah did great things as lead designer of the Chevrolet Volt, GM's successful plug-in hybrid vehicle. Now he's unveiling the Chevy Bolt, a concept all-electric car that will be capable of traveling 200 miles between charges and that will sell in the low $30,000 range. This could transform the prospects for widespread adoption of electric cars. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Electric Vehicles and HEVs  

Googling the Physical World

David Wentzloff wants to get rid of batteries and build the Internet of Things - a "Google of the physical world." This undertaking will use trillions of tiny sensors embedded in everything you can think of, communicating wirelessly. With his company PsiKick, David hopes to provide the technology that makes it happen. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Technology Transfer  Wentzloff, David  Wireless Communications  

Stephen Forrest - The End of Moore's Law: Are We Facing the Creation or the Apocalypse?

At long last, Moores Law is inevitably reaching its end. Nothing continues in an exponential fashion forever, and the same goes for the miniaturization of transistors that has led to this computational explosion. In his distinguished faculty lecture, Stephen Forrest, Paul G. Goebel Collegiate Professor of Engineering, discusses this trend and what it means for industry and the economy. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

ECE Celebrates Diwali

ECE continued its new tradition of celebrating the different cultures of its student body with a celebration of Diwali on November 13. The event included Indian music, dance, cuisine, and other Diwali traditions. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Diversity and Outreach  

Chillin with Chewie

Are you hyped up for The Force Awakens? So is U-M Engineering to celebrate, faculty have been bringing in some familiar faces to talk Star Wars tech and get down with a holiday rap from Dean Munson. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lab-Systems  Munson Jr., David C.  Nees, John A.  

Demosthenis Teneketzis Earns George S. Axelby Outstanding Paper Award for Solution to a Class of Fundamental Control Problems

Prof. Demosthenis Teneketzis has been awarded the IEEE Control Systems Society's George S. Axelby Outstanding Paper Award for his paper Decentralized Stochastic Control with Partial History Sharing: A Common Information Approach. The paper presents a new methodology that achieves the optimal solution of a very broad class of previously unsolved stochastic control problems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Lab-Systems  Teneketzis, Demosthenis  

ECE Spinoff Xtera Communications Sets Terms for IPO

Xtera Communications, founded by Prof. Mohammed Islam, went public in November. Xtera is a leading provider of high-capacity, cost-effective optical transport solutions, supporting the high growth in global demand for bandwidth. The company sells its high-capacity optical transport solutions to telecommunications service providers, content service providers, enterprises and government entities worldwide to support their deployments of long-haul terrestrial and submarine optical cable networks. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Islam, Mohammed  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Technology Transfer  

How someday robots may run to the rescue -- literally

Prof. Jessy Grizzle Grizzle, along with a group of robotics engineers and students at U-M, is not only working to develop algorithms -- self-contained, step-by-step operations -- to be performed by walking robots, he's working to revolutionize them. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

How computers are getting better at detecting liars

This article highlights the lie-detecting software that was created by Prof. Rada Mihalcea. Using videos from high-stakes court cases, the researchers have built a lie-detecting software database that uses a persons words and gestures to detect behavioral patterns that may be out of the norm. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Mihalcea, Rada  

Mapping the brain: Probes with tiny LEDs shed light on neural pathways

With the help of light-emitting diodes as small as neurons, University of Michigan researchers are unlocking the secrets of neural pathways in the brain. The researchers have built and tested in mice neural probes that hold what are believed to be the smallest implantable LEDs ever made. The new probes can control and record the activity of many individual neurons, measuring how changes in the activity of a single neuron can affect its neighbors. The team anticipates that experiments using probes based on their design could lead to breakthroughs in understanding and treating neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brain  Health  Ku, Pei-Cheng (P.C.)  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Yoon, Euisik  

Parag Deotare: New Faculty Member with a Nanophotonics Focus

Parag Deotare is joining the department as a new faculty member January 2016. He one of four new faculty that we are excited to welcome to Michigan in the coming year. His research interest lies in light-matter interaction in nanoscale systems for the development of low energy photonic and excitonic devices, for applications in data communication and life sciences. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Avestruz, Al-Thaddeus  Deotare, Parag  Finelli, Cynthia  

Celebrating Maxwell's Equations: 150 Years

A special celebration took place on November 20 that brought over 100 attendees together to commemorate the anniversary of James Clerk Maxwell's foundational treatise on light and electromagnetism. Titled Celebrating Maxwell's Equations: 150 Years," the event brought together students, researchers, and industry experts from around the nation to enjoy keynote talks, project demonstrations, and open discussion with a panel of experts. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lasers  Lee, Somin E.  Optics and Photonics  Peterson, Becky (R. L.)  

Winter 2016: Multidisciplinary Capstone Design Project - Supplemental Information

Course No.: EECS 498-006 and EECS 498-007
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Tony Grbic or Greg Wakefield
Prerequisites: See PDF

Course Description:
See attached PDF [More Info]

Winter 2016: Multidisciplinary Capstone (MDE) Design Pilot

Course No.: EECS 498
Credit Hours: 3 or 4 credits
Instructor: Brian Gilchrist
Prerequisites: EECS student

Course Description:
EECS students, together with ME and MSE students, work on common, interesting, significant major design experience (MDE) projects. This pilot douse is about providing students real-world, multidisciplinary design project opportunities to satisfy their MDE requirement and for ECE masters students interested in meaningful project experiences.

For WN16, we will have several projects with a biomedical focus as well as energy, sports, spaceflight, and other areas needing EECS students (e.g. sensor/electronics, embedded systems, controls, and wireless). Please contact Prof. Gilchrist with questions. [More Info]

Smarter renewable power: six innovations

Innovations are helping renewable energy become more accessible, powerful and effective. Among these are solar cells inspired by ancient Japanese paper cutting. Using this technique allows the cells to flex and track the sun for increased effieciency. The concept was developed in part by Prof. Stephen Forrest, working with prof. Max Shtein in MSE and Matt Shlian in U-M Art and Design. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Forrest, Stephen  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Solar Cell Technology  

Al Hero Receives 2015 IEEE Signal Processing Society Award

Alfred Hero, R. Jamison and Betty Williams Professor of Engineering, has received the 2015 IEEE Signal Processing Society Award, for contributions to the field of statistical signal and image processing and for sustained service to the Society. This is ahe highest award given by the Signal Processing Society, and honors outstanding technical contributions in the field, as well as outstanding leadership. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Hero, Alfred  Lab-Software Systems  

Irma Wyman (1928-2015), Alumna and Pioneer of Women in Engineering, Passed Away

Irma Wyman (BSE EngMath 49) passed away on Tuesday, November 17, 2015. Irma was a pioneer in the field of computers, beginning with her work on some of the earliest programmable machines ever made. As the first female vice president at Honeywell, she knew success - but she also knew firsthand how rare she was to succeed in a field where women were scarce. She became a strong advocate for equal opportunity for women, and established the Irma M. Wyman Scholarship at the University of Michigan's Center for the Education of Women. The scholarship supports women in engineering, computer science, and related fields. Irma passed away on Tuesday, November 17, 2015. [Read more about Irma Wyman's work and experiences.] [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Alumnus Benson Yeh Earns Overall 1st Place at Reimagine Education Awards for First Chinese MOOC

Prof. Benson Yeh (PhD EE:S 05) of the National Taiwan University competed in the 2014 Wharton-QS Stars: Reimagine Education Awards, earning a 1st Place Overall Award and E-Learning Award. Yeh's group created a multi-student social gaming platform called PaGamO, the first ever MOOC made in Chinese. This platform allows thousands of students to compete on the same map by occupying territory through problem solving. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Winter 2016: Information Retrieval and Web Search

Course No.: EECS 498-001
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Rada Mihalcea
Prerequisites: EECS 281

Course Description:
This course will cover traditional material, as well as recent advances in Information Retrieval (IR), the study of indexing, processing, querying, and classifying data. Basic retrieval models, algorithms, and IR system implementations will be covered. [More Info]

Winter 2016: Introduction to Autonomous Robotics

Course No.: EECS 398-002
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Chad Jenkins
Prerequisites: Linear algebra (MATH 214, 217, 417, 419) and data structures (EECS 281 or equivalent)

Course Description:
This course will cover the essentials of robot modeling and autonomy. See flyer website for more details. [More Info]

Winter 2016: Social Computing Systems

Course No.: EECS 498-008
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Walter Lasecki
Prerequisites: EECS 493 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
Computation rarely exists in isolation. From social media, to collaboration and coordination tools, to crowdsourcing and collective intelligence, technology has risen from use as an individual tool for focused domains to play a role in or even mediate a majority of social interactions today. Social Computing is the study of this interplay between social processes and the computation that supports and augments them. This course will cover topics including social media, systems for supporting collective action, data mining and analysis, crowdsourcing, human computation, and peer production. [More Info]

Winter 2016: Computing for Computer Scientists

Course No.: EECS 398-003
Credit Hours: 1 credit
Instructor: Pat Pannuto
Prerequisites: None

Course Description:
Learn the tools that every computer scientist should know: Shells, Scripting, Makefiles, Version Control, Compilers, Text Editors, Debugging. This class is a 1 credit seminar meeting weekly on Fridays from 1:30-2:30, designed for early-career EECS students. [More Info]

Winter 2016: Power System Markets & Optimization

Course No.: EECS 598-003
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Johanna Mathieu
Prerequisites: EECS 463

Course Description:
This course covers the fundamentals of electric power system markets, and the optimization methods required to solve planning and operational problems including economic dispatch, optimal power flow, and unit commitment. The course will highlight recent advances including convex relaxations of the optimal power flow problem, and formulations/solutions to stochastic dispatch problems. Problems will be placed in the context of actual electricity markets, and new issues, such as incorporation of renewable resources and demand response into markets, will be covered. All students will conduct an individual research project. [More Info]

Winter 2016: Intelligent Interactive Systems (IIS)

Course No.: EECS 498-002
Credit Hours: 4 credits
Instructor: Emily Mower Provost
Prerequisites: EECS 280 or permission of instructor

Course Description:
Today's world is becoming increasingly automated. This includes not only explicit interactions with automated systems, but also implicit sensing that accompanies many popular technologies. Explicit interactions include speech-based question answering with Siri and Google Voice. But what can we learn implicitly? How can we take advantage of the wealth of pervasive and ubiquitous computing platforms? How can we leverage distributed sensor environments? These are the questions that increasingly underlie Intelligent Interactive Systems (IIS). The focus of this class will be on providing methods that can be used to answer these questions and a semester-long project that ties these questions together through a new interactive technology. [More Info]

Winter 2016: Learn To Be A Software Consultant By Doing Consulting!

Course No.: EECS 498-009
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Elliot Soloway
Prerequisites: Senior status in CSE

Course Description:
As part of UMichs Innovate Blue, the School of Information offers a Design Clinic (see description below) where budding entrepreneurs come with software projects and receive UI/UX consulting from SI students. However, the entrepreneurs oftentimes have questions about software design and development (questions about prototyping tools, underlying architecture, etc.).

In this 498, then, CSE students would serve two 2.5 hour/week shifts in the Design Clinic providing software design/development consulting to entrepreneurs and they would create template apps as demos; in addition, CSE students will participate in learning sessions with the other consultants. CSE students will develop consulting skills as they provide real consulting to users of the Design Clinic. [More Info]

Four Tips to Making the Most of Your Data

Too often, retailers hear, You should use big data in your retail operation, and immediately start analyzing data to figure out what lessons can be learned. Unfortunately, without a game plan in advance, this practice is more like searching for needles in haystacks. Brandon Levey (BSE MSE EE 04 06) offers tips for retailers' overall strategy to help them dive into the pool.
Related Topics:  Alumni  

Bioengineering professor featured in Top 100 list on African-American influential site

Bioengineer Todd Coleman (BSE EE CE 00), now at the University of California - San Diego, has been named one of 100 outstanding individuals for 2015 by The Root, a premier news, opinion, and culture site for African-American influencers. Coleman's research brings together electronics for medical use, machine learning and public health. His research group develops multi-functional, flexible bio-electronics and new analytics methods to help patients and medical decision makers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

NREL research honored with R&D 100 awards

A technology developed at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), led by ECE alumnus Christ Deline (BSE MSE PhD EE 03 05 08), has been honored by R&D Magazine as a winner of a coveted R&D 100 award as well as an Editor's Choice award. The team's research into using a strain of cyanobacteria to produce bioethylene won both awards in the category of Mechanical Devices/Materials. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Winter 2016: Advanced Topics and Design of Power Electronics

Course No.: EECS 598-007
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Al-Thaddeus Avestruz
Prerequisites: EECS 418 and EECS 460 or equivalents

Course Description:
This class will address some advanced topics and techniques in power electronics and the craft of design through case studies. Topics may include switched capacitor circuits, resonant power conversion, magnetics, wireless power transfer, and instrumentation, among other. Advanced methods in the analysis, manufacturing, and control of power electronics will also be discussed. [More Info]

Winter 2016: Topics in Optoexcitonic Engineering

Course No.: EECS 598-009
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Parag Deotare
Prerequisites: Introductory electromagnetics and solid state physics or permission of instructor

Course Description:
This seminar course will review recent research and developments on topics in Nanophotonics and Excitonic Engineering with potential applications in data communication and processing. Topics covered will be related to engineering interaction of light with nanoscale systems, optical interactions between nanosystems and resonance phenomenon. Students read research papers followed by a brief lecture introducing the important related concepts before the papers are open for discussion in the class. Students/teams will also spend last 4 weeks investigating a current research problem posed by a faculty member. This will entail reading and spending time in the faculty lab and will be followed by a presentation to the full class. [More Info]

Soon We Will Hunt Like Predator With This New Night-Vision Sensor

Graphene could make it possible to build ultra-thin, flexible thermal sensors for built-in night vision technology just like that lethal alien in the Predator franchise. Last year, Zhaohui Zhong created a prototype graphene-based contact lens that could image IR at room-temperature. That device is about the size of a fingernail and could be scaled down further, making it suitable for contact lenses or arrays of infrared camera sensors for wearable electronics. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graphene  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Zhong, Zhaohui  

Samsung President and CMO, WP Hong, Ph.D., to Keynote at CES 2016

The Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) announced that Dr. Won-Pyo Hong (MSE PhD EE 84 88), President and CMO of Samsung Electronics, will deliver a keynote address at the 2016 Consumer Electronics Show (CES). The keynote is scheduled for Thursday, January 7. CES is the worlds gathering place for all who thrive on the business of consumer technologies, and will run January 6-9, 2016, in Las Vegas, Nevada. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

All ECE News for 2016