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Emily Mower Provost

Emotion has intrigued researchers for generations, motivating the development of affective computational models for classification. My research focus is to provide a computational description of human emotion perception and combine this knowledge with the information gleaned from emotion classification experiments to gain new insight into emotion expression. Our goal is to use these technologies to build the next generation of affective assistive devices.

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Georg Essl

Technologies can enable new creative possibilities or enhance existing practices. My research explores how to build interactive systems which support live artistic performance, including the design of novel controllers and the development of algorithms that are capable of generating rich media content in real-time.We explore the creative potential of mobile devices and design environments that make flexible content creation, live programming, and performance both rich and easy.

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Elliot Soloway

There is no question that mobile technologies are the most transformative, disruptive technological innovation since the coming of the mainframe. With respect to education, nothing less than revolutionizing how children as well as adults learn is on offer. While the challenges for designing for small screens are sincere, the real challenge is not thinking big enough so that the inevitable march of technology doesn’t obsolete one’s research.

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David Kieras

A better approach to developing systems that are easy to use and effective is first, base the interface design on concepts and principles from human factors and cognitive psychology. Then second, analyze and predict the effectiveness of the design using simulated humans that are based on a cognitive architecture for human perception, cognition, and action. My research focuses on developing such modeling techniques both for the initial design of the system functionality, and the evaluation of specific detailed interface designs.

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Mark Ackerman

The SocialWorlds Research group focuses on social computing, collaborative technologies, and pervasive (ubiquitous) computing. We are currently working on ways to find people and share expertise; crowdsourcing; new collaborative ways of reusing informal information; user control in pervasive environments, especially using other people’s activities as guides; socially-based health support; and privacy. Past projects include systems for routing questions in e-communities and information distillation.

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Greg Wakefield

How we hear determines what we hear. My research, and that of my students, integrates what we know about hearing with what we know about sound producing objects to create and develop a variety of interactive systems. Our most recent efforts are in the areas of immersive spatial audio, vocal pedagogy, and sound quality engineering. We are also interested in exploring fundamental aspects of auditory perception and in the integration of what we learn from these studies into models of cognitive architecture.

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Eytan Adar

I work on Internet-scale systems, social network analysis, text mining, and visualization. I work on temporal informatics: the study of the change of information – and our consumption of it – over time. One example is Zoetrope, where users can look back though previous versions of Web pages and generate visualizations and extractions of the temporal data. I have also done important work on a range of other topics, including social network analysis.

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