Course Catalog Description:

Principles of designing application-specific computer systems that interact with the physical world. Covers memory-mapped I/O, interrupts, analog interfacing, microprocessors, reconfigurable hardware, sensors, and actuators. Complex hardware/software system design and implementation. Substantial student-defined team design project.
Lecture & Lab - Credits: 4

Prerequisites

Having taken the prerequisites of EECS 270 and EECS 370 implies students have also taken EECS 280. To be successful in EECS 373 students should be familiar with: (on the hardware side) Boolean algebra, gates, multiplexers, flip-flops, and finite-state machines, (on the computer architecture side) assembly language, pipelining, memory, and caching, and (on the software side) program control structures (if/then/else, while and for loops), functions, procedures, parameter passing, pointer-based data structures, and basic structured programming techniques (information hiding, modular programming, etc.).

Learning Outcomes

There are a number of educational goals for EECS 373, the primary ones are:

Grading

The following gives the grade breakdown lecture and labs components.

            Overall breakdown:
            Item                  Weight         
            ======                =========
            Class Participation    2%
            Lecture Worksheets     2%
            Homework               10%
            Labs (7)               25% 
            Exam 1                 18%
            Exam 2                 18%
            Final Project          25%

        

General Policy & Honor code

All students in the class are presumed to be decent and honorable, and all students in the class are bound by the College of Engineering Honor Code. Your primary goal should be to learn and master the material in the course so that you can be productive, effective, and knowledgeable engineers and scientists! Grades should only be a reflection of the level of knowledge you have gained not a goal until itself.

You may not seek to gain an unfair advantage over your fellow students; you may not consult, look at, or possess the unpublished work of others without their permission; and you must appropriately acknowledge your use of another’s work. Any violation of the honor policies appropriate to each piece of course work will be reported to the Honor Council.

Exams

Each student must complete the exam solely by her or his own efforts. Questions can be asked only of the course instructors. The exam must be completed within the specified time. Note: Limitations on calculator types, use of notes, books, etc. are also appropriate. Instruction on acceptable tools and notes will be give before the exam.

Homework (Limited collaboration):

You may discuss homework assignments with your fellow students at the conceptual level, but must complete all calculations and write-ups, from scrap to final form, on your own. Verbatim copying of another student’s work is forbidden. You may not consult homework solutions from a previous term unless they are made available in a publicly accessible form (no unfair advantage can be sought). If you find a direct solution to homework problems online you are to inform the instructors.

Labs & Final Project (Limited collaboration):

You may discuss the labs and the final project with fellow students outside your lab group at the conceptual level, but must complete all calculations, coding and write-up, from scratch to final form, on your own. Verbatim copying of another student’s work is forbidden. You may not consult labs and final project solutions from a previous term unless they are made available in a publicly accessible form (no unfair advantage can be sought). If you find a direct solution to labs and final projects problems online you are to inform the instructors.

The embedded systems industry and community have generated a significant amount of online example code, tutorials, and libraries to help engineering rapidly build embedded systems. You are allowed and encouraged to use these resources. However, you must explicitly credit other people's work. Clearly identify any libraries and source code you are using or referencing, and importantly draw a clear distinction between what you have done versus what others have created.

Homework (Limited collaboration):

Late Policy for Homework & Labs

Homework is to be submitted via Lecture Gradescope on the due dates indicated. Homework can be submitted up to 24 hours after the due date but will receive a 10% penalty. No homework will be accepted after the “late” deadline. Student's with extenuating circumstances should contact the instructors before the homework is due.

Lab assignments will be submitted to your Lab Section’s Gradescope on the due dates indicated. It is important that labs are completed on time to ensure students keep up with the class. Labs submitted up to 24 hours late will receive a 5% penalty. This reduced penalty in the first 24 hours is intended to accommodate minor errors and lapses that can cause students to be “a little late”. After 24 hours the late penalty is 10% per day up to a maximum of 5 days late in total. For example: an “in lab demo” that is due on Tuesday at 11:59, will receive a 5% penalty if submitted at or before 11:59 on Wednesday, the same lab submitted on or before Thursday at 11:59 will receive a total late penalty of 15%, submitted on Friday will receive a total of 25%, and submitted on Saturday will receive a 35% penalty. Student's with extenuating circumstances should contact the instructors before the homework is due.

Extenuating Circumstances & Getting Help

We fully understand that remote learning and the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic are going to present challenges that will disproportionately affect some students more than others. We are committed to making sure everyone can be successful in EECS 373. Students that are experiencing difficulties with the class that are outside the normal (regardless if it is related to Covid-19 related or not) are encouraged to reach out to the instructors as early as possible. The earlier you make us aware of a problem the easier it is for use to help you. We are happy to work with and accommodate students that are making a good faith effort to responsibly resolve issues early on. In contrast, it is much more difficult to make accommodations for an issue after an assignment is due or an exam is given.

Student Mental Health and Wellbeing

The University of Michigan is committed to advancing the mental health and wellbeing of its students. If you or someone you know is feeling overwhelmed, depressed, and/or in need of support, services are available. For help, contact Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) at (734) 764-8312 and https://caps.umich.edu during and after hours, on weekends and holidays, or through its counselors physically located in schools on both North and Central Campus. You may also consult University Health Service (UHS) at (734) 764-8320 and https://www.uhs.umich.edu/mentalhealthsvcs, or for alcohol or drug concerns, see www.uhs.umich.edu/aodresources.

For a listing of other mental health resources available on and off campus, visit http://umich.edu/~mhealth/.